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Keep in mind that you are trying to seat a new pad on worn roter face, this will take longer than if the roters han been resurfaced. Imo brake roters should allways be machined or replaced when changing pads for the best performance. Good luck!
I too thought about this as well. But how much longer? 10 miles, 100 miles, - 1,000 miles ?

With non-resurfaced rotors w/ 20K previous miles, I would think that ~120 miles would be long enough.
 

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Possibly, but it feels like a lot more than 10% loss of performance. If they did it right, there shouldn't be any loss in performance. Significantly reducing contact area (with the crazy/aggressive chamfer cuts in the lining) isn't the way to do it. If anything, they could have increased contact area by making the lining footprint bigger (there's room on the metal carrier plate for that).
Again, there's always a tradeoff. For me, the minimized dust was worth the sacrifice. But again, I don't race the car. If I did, the original pads would go back on.


And put on what ?
Satisfied Pro's, they are no longer available. I believe they got absorbed by another company.

The bedding process didn't do squat. Besides, I never "bedded" the factory OEM Brembo pads, nor do I believe that they did that at the factory.
Bedding the brakes is important. I bedded my factory pads within the first week of owning the car.
I would give them a few more miles and if you're not happy with them, put the Brembo's back on.
 

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Well, it's been a couple of weeks now, and a lot more miles, and nothing has changed.

So the Hawk HPS's will be coming off, and the original Bremo's will be going back on.

The main issue I have with them is that they just "come on" too slow and mushy. That is to say, that when you hit the brakes (at any initial pressure), the car has to roll for a bit before they start to bite. When they do bite, and you get into deep deceleration, the braking effort is somewhat close to the factory Bremo's, but I'd have to actually do braking distance tests to know how close they really are. The pedal (at dead stop) is good and firm, and not mushy.

But like I said, it's the way they initially bite that I have issue with. With the factory Brembo's, any amount of "jab" into the brake pedal would result in an equally felt instant jerk. There is nothing remotely "instant" about the HAWK's. Braking performance of my SRT Challenger has been reduced to that of my 2010 Chevy Silverado.

It's also my feeling that the reduced contact area of the HAWK HPS's is playing a significant role in what I'm feeling.

But, I took the chance and listened to the advice of some of the posters here, and it just didn't pan out for me.

Common sense prevails: Brembo knows brakes, and brake design, and someone knew all of this when they designed the Challenger SRT, so thinking that you can go to a non-Brembo pad, especially ones with reduced contact area and get close to the same OEM performance is a bit naive. Something I learned the hard way.

To Hawk's credit, it might just be that the "HPS" is the wrong product choice (if you were attempting to duplicate factory OEM Challenger SRT braking performance). I see that their Performance Plus pads have a full contact area (unlike the regular HPS):




Also, in talking (face-to-face) with other folks with Performance cars (Euro cars), seems brake dust is a way of life. I talked to an owner of some performance Mercedes Benz that he was showing me (forget the model), and his brake dust situation was just as bad (if not worse) than my SRT. But he said he's never take the chance of losing that, and he actually enjoys washing/detailing his car, so it's just a non issue.

I think what makes is seem worse to us SRT owners is the wheel design itself. On this one guy performance Benze that he was showing me (and another guys car), the wheel design is such that it really doesn't show the dust as much.

So I'll get the HPS's off, and offer em up for sale cheap, either on this forum (if they have a 4sale forum), - or E-bay.

Thanks for all the dialogue on this, - but it's a closed issue for me. The upshot is, I got experience on how to jack the car up, and change the brakes (for whatever value that has).
 

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and i thank you for this posting.. I have been back and fourth.. do i change them. . do i leave them.. go hawks.. go EBC.. i hate the dust.. but what you have went thru is what i have often wondered about..

I will stick with what i got until time comes when i NEED TO CHANGE THEM.. and i may even the put back factory pads again.

I hate dust.. but would rather have dust then missing the front end of my car because the breaks didn't work well.
 

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Thanks for this thread, I have been contemplating switching mine out as well to the Hawks, but I would never want to sacrifice being able to stop quicker for less dust.

I hate the dust,it gets all over,besides the wheels the lower body panels as well, but as someone who drives perhaps a little too aggressively at times, having the supreme stopping power of the Brembo's is something I don't want to give up.


Sent from AutoGuide.com App
 

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Have heard good things about the Red Stuff Pads. Also, if anyone is inspecting their rotors a good check is visual through the wheel spokes and look at the rotor if no scoring may be ok with just pads. Then use your finger to feel if there is a ridge on the outside of the rotor just outside where the pad rides. If this ridge is no taller than about 1/16" then probably ok for another round just replace pads if needed. If ever in doubt or see heat cracking then its good to get a professional or experienced opinion before throwing your hard earned cash at new rotors. Hope this helps.
 
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