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Discussion Starter #1
I posted this on another site with limited responses.

Original post:

I hate to beat this topic to death, but I'm looking for recommendations for adequate quality octane boosters for my 2016 Challenger 392 Hemi. All I run in the car is 90 octane ethanol-free fuel & it seems to run fine on that, but I'm thinking I should be running a little higher octane. What do you guys think?

Added:

From the owner's manual:

6.4L Engine
This engine is designed to meet all
emission regulations, provide optimal
fuel economy and performance when
using high-quality unleaded “Premium”
gasoline having a posted octane
number of 91 as specified by the
(R+M)/2 method. The use of 91 or
higher octane “Premium” gasoline is required for in this
engine.
While operating on gasoline with the required octane
number, hearing a light knocking sound from the engine
is not a cause for concern. However, if the engine is heard making a heavy knocking sound, see your dealer immediately.
Use of gasoline with a lower than recommended
octane number can cause engine failure and may void or
not be covered by the New Vehicle Limited Warranty.

Also - this is a little later into the brochure:

CAUTION! (Continued)
or malfunctioning and may require immediate service.
Contact your authorized dealer for service
assistance.
• The use of fuel additives, which are now being
sold as octane enhancers, is not recommended.
Most of these products contain high concentrations
of methanol. Fuel system damage or vehicle performance
problems resulting from the use of such
fuels or additives is not the responsibility of the
manufacturer and may void or not be covered
under the New Vehicle Limited Warranty.
_______________________________________________________________________

One poster recommended using Torco Unleaded Accelerator. Any further advice?
 

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2013 Challenger SXT
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Boostane works, I ran this in my supercharged v6 and saw my timing retard reduced in my data logs, 1 32 oz can in a tank will raise 91 octane to around 99 octane or so. This stuff has been tested by several independent dyno operators and shows it works. thetuningschool on youtube did a real good test against race fuel.

I'll be using it in my srt 392 when I go to the race track, since I have first hand seen it work.

This video they are just giving a quick over view of all the testing they did, one thing to note they ran the most timing with no knock with each product, they controlled the timing limits, where as like my v6 car, there was a timing "goal" if you will to run 24 degrees, if you put in 91 octane which is the best pump gas in my area, I would only get about 18 degrees total, adding boostane I saw around 22 degrees. So I didn't have to change my tune, the computer allowed more timing and only retarded it if it heard knock, so I assume the 392 would have similar tune- that there is a preset timing goal and running more octane may allow me to reach full timing. The tuning school manually changed their timing for their testing. With a little knock allowed they actually got over 600 hp just using boostane almost 30 hp or so increase but to keep testing fair they didn't allow any knock with each test and posted that hp number and timing increase with each product.

So check out their other video's.


 

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Yes, but with ethanol. I don't want to run ANY ethanol fuel in this car!
Why? Modern engines are designed and certified to run on ethanol fuels.

According to the government, all gasoline-powered vehicles, built before 2001, can use E10 or even E15 safely (10% or 15% ethanol mix). However, this does not apply to classic cars. Owners of these older cars have reported that ethanol tends to dry out and cause decay in rubber hoses, seals, and diaphragms.
 

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There is nothing wrong with running ethanol fuel.
 

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There is less btu's in any ethanol blend , ethanol fuels ruin gas mileage and hp, it's junk fuel, so many folks think since it's a few cents cheaper than straight gas they are saving money, when you are actually costing yourself more money in the long haul. With the two statements above this is what most folks think- uninformed and don't know any better.

Best to stick with straight fuels if you can.
 

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Some states have only fuel with ethanol. Mine is one of them and that's all I've been running for years. Guess what? Never had any issues and that included my 700+ horespower Whippled Mach 1.
 

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There is less btu's in any ethanol blend , ethanol fuels ruin gas mileage and hp
Ethanol fuel does not 'ruin' gas mileage. I agree it does not get as good mileage as straight gas but it is not hurting your car in the least. At least not on newer models. Same with horsepower. Ethanol does not have the horsepower capability because of the btu's but it isn't diminishing it. If that were the case the same argument could be made of ethanol free vs race fuel. I believe this is what the previous posts were pertaining too.
 

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There is less btu's in any ethanol blend , ethanol fuels ruin gas mileage and hp, it's junk fuel, so many folks think since it's a few cents cheaper than straight gas they are saving money, when you are actually costing yourself more money in the long haul. With the two statements above this is what most folks think- uninformed and don't know any better.

Best to stick with straight fuels if you can.
More BTU's may not be beneficial. 115,000 BTU gasoline may actually produce more usable power than 125000 BTU gasoline. The reason? The "heavier" gasoline the one with more BTU's may not combust as completely at higher engine speeds and thus deliver less energy.

While gasoline with ethanol at least on paper could deliver slightly lower gas mileage not sure in real life if this is the case or if it is there is that much difference. I have never had a chance to compare mileage running say 91 octane ethanol free gasoline and 91 octane gasoline with ethanol.

The ethanol in gasoline carries oxygen and this results in more complete combustion of the fuel which helps the engine extract more mechanical power from the chemical energy of the burning fuel.

While you may get better gas mileage buying <91 octane gasoline and adding some octane booster to the fuel to bring its octane rating up to where it should be you will pay more for the <91 octane gasoline and octane booster than you would if you just ran 91 gasoline with ethanol.

Boostane has been suggested as a good octane booster. I have not used it but it appears to contain "octane" (C8H18) which is the portion of gasoline that provides the higher octane characteristic of gasoline. You can visit the Boostane web site and check out the chart to find out how much Boostane you'll need to treat a tank of <91 octane gasoline to bring it to 91 or whatever octane you desire.

Since '96 starting with my Mustang GT I have driven 656K miles in my cars all running 99% of the time running 91 octane gasoline with ethanol (99% as on road trips out of CA I might have filled up with ethanol free gasoline but I can't recall) and not one engine or fuel system related problem that can even be remotely attributed to running ethanol gasoline. (A couple of fuel pumps quit but one quit at 120K miles the other at 172K miles.)

I think you are in Highland Michigan? I did a search and there are a few stations around your area that carry 93 octane gasoline. One in West Bloomfield Township another in Waterford. There are more and maybe one located in a area you frequent and could fill up? I commute 30 miles to work and often fill up at a station close to work as it has lower gas prices than stations nearer to me where I live.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
When it sits in the tank, it separates - the ethanol goes to the bottom. Also the shelf life is very short. Ethanol is nothing more than a political scheme & "feel good" environmental stunt. There is nothing good about ethanol additive & it has messed-up pretty much all of my power equipment & carburetors. I just prefer to run pure gas & want to raise the octane some.
 

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When it sits in the tank, it separates - the ethanol goes to the bottom. Also the shelf life is very short. Ethanol is nothing more than a political scheme & "feel good" environmental stunt. There is nothing good about ethanol additive & it has messed-up pretty much all of my power equipment & carburetors. I just prefer to run pure gas & want to raise the octane some.
My experience is the ethanol treated gasoline does not stratify, at least to any degree that leaving a vehicle sitting unused 6 months manifested.

In-tank fuel pumps have some flow directed to circulate fuel in the tank to help keep the fuel pump cool and as a by product this works to stir up the fuel alleviating any stratification that might occur.

The shelf life of premium fuel is short compared to regular. In the case I mentioned above after 6 months the engine still started and idled and ran ok. That is there was no backfiring, misfiring, no signs the fuel was bad. Now I will admit it was bad in that after some driving I ran the fuel tank low and after I refilled it with fresh Shell V-Power -- which is the gasoline my sister used in the car -- the engine was noticeably peppier with fresh gasoline in the fuel tank. This did highlight that fuel can and does go stale.

But I seriously doubt where you live/drive that 6 month old gasoline is common. If you put the car away 6 months in the winter I suspect even ethanol free premium will go stale. There are, I believe (but no direct experience), steps you can take to mitigate the effects time has on the fuel in the fuel tank.

During the driving season my best advice is to buy whatever fuel you chose to run from a busy station to ensure you get the freshest fuel.

I can't really argue against the point that there is some political aspect to the use the mandated use of ethanol in gasoline. And the environmental benefits are overstated while the harm this use of ethanol (the plowing/seeding/fertilizing/harvesting/transportation of the corn (mainly) used to produce ethanol) does to the environment is understated. (It also uses agriculture resources that could be used to grow food for humans. There are a huge number of humans without sufficient food.) The use of ethanol in gasoline should be up to market and not the government, especially not a government whose members (some members) benefit from the ethanol mandate and work to keep this charade going.

If you want to run pure gasoline, that's your decision of course. Likewise, if you are ok with having to add an octane booster in order to run pure gasoline that has less than the recommended octane rating that is entirely up to you. You have to be sure you use an octane booster that is harmless to the engine and to avoid inhaling any fumes or contact with your skin.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
And back to the original topic - what are some good & non-harmful octane boosters?
 

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If I were in need of an octane booster I'd check out this stuff:

https://boostane.com/

I've come upon some threads in which various octane boosters are discussed and the reports are by people who use the stuff its pretty good. I checked it out as best I could -- found its Material Data Safety Sheet (MSDS) online -- and it appears to consist of "octane" (aka iso-octane) (C8/H18). This chemical is the standard 100 points on the octane rating scale and is already a component of gasoline. It is not a "foreign" additive but something that is already found in gasoline.

Essentially by adding Boostane one just puts more in of what accounts for the octane rating the fuel already has.
 

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OK, here is my fuel for this fire. The 2010 Dakota with 4.7 benefited significantly using straight gas, more than enough increase in mileage to offset the price increase. No other benefits were noticeable. 2011 Ram with 5.7 had no increase in gas mileage using straight gas compared to 89 octane with 10 -15% ethanol. The Ram weighing 1000 lb. more got approximately 1 MPG more than the Dakota in same driving conditions (mostly highway). The sample size was more than large enough to confirm these observations.

On the Scat Pack, using 93 octane pump gas with 10% ethanol data logs of 1/4 mile drag races showed 1.5* KR at 2,3,4 shift and 2.5* KR at 5 shift. I investigated Race gas and additives to reduce KR. Final candidates were MS-109 race gas , TORCO Accelerator, & Boostane. On paper, performance and octane increase was similar from all with MS-109 have a slight edge in performance and no harmful affects on the engine while the additives could create deposits on engine components within the combustion chamber. In the end TORCO won out due to logistics, convenience, cost, & availability.

Used TORCO to increase 93 octane pump gas to 96 which resulted in cutting KR in half. Best ET was .01 better than previous best and MPH was .5 better on good runs and not so good runs. (Only ran TORCO once so can't confirm the results are the result of TORCO as the DA was very favorable as well)

While TORCO appears to be a good choice for me for drag racing I definitely would not use it on a regular basis because of the potential for deposits. As well it would be expensive and I doubt it would provide any noticeable difference in off track driving.

Hope this helps.
 

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I've been using ACES IV Gasoline Formula « BND Automotive


It claims to increase octane, add upper cylinder lubrication and provides fuel system cleaning.


I have data logged with it and I see equivalent characteristics (performance, gas mileage, knock retard) using 89 octane with the additive compared to 93 without. Since I am using the stock tune, I won't see any gains with 93 with the additive as my engine is not experiencing KR with 89 treated with the additive.



It would be interesting to data log 93 and the additive with a tune, but I'm content with leaving everything stock at this time.
 

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"...I won't see any gains with 93 with the additive as my engine is not experiencing KR with 89 treated with the additive."

What's KR?
 
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