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Discussion Starter #1
I’m at 175K miles on the OE alternator (220A), and while it still works, I’m wondering how much longer it will live.

It’s had a hard life up until now, and it will continue to have a hard life until it dies or gets replaced (multiple audio amplifiers pushing it to its max and beyond regularly), and I would much rather replace it at my convenience rather than let it strand me in the middle of nowhere when it does eventually die.

I am curious if anyone has gotten 200K miles out of their OE 220A alt. Anyone?

How much beyond 200K miles did you get it?
 

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Nuke,
Ive thought about this very thing, especially now that my 2015 has developed a slight whine under load.
IMHO, its better to do when you want to/when you can, than when you maybe forced to.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Nuke,
Ive thought about this very thing, especially now that my 2015 has developed a slight whine under load.
IMHO, its better to do when you want to/when you can, than when you maybe forced to.
I just got home from a one way drive that took me almost 8 hrs, and I started out in the desert southwestern area of Texas where I was staying for 2 days. I’ve already had a water pump go out during one of these trips back and forth, and it left me in a compromised position to change it when it did. It at least still ran and allowed me to get it to a place to do the work. If my alternator goes out in a similar situation, I’ll be stuck doing it wherever it breaks down - side of the road, 7-11 parking lot, etc. - which I really want to avoid.

If this alternator could be reasonably expected to last a good bit more beyond 175K miles, I might hold off on this, but I just don’t think these alternators are known for making it 200K miles or more. If I’m wrong, I’m willing to be corrected, but it will take more than 1 or 2 examples to convince me not to.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It’s also worth mentioning that since my current alternator is still working, I will NOT be using it as a core for the new purchase; I will eat the core charge and keep the working alternator.

I am doing this to hedge my bets in case the reman unit I go with goes teets up too quickly as they sometimes do.
 

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2018 Dodge Challenger T/A Plus in Yellow Jacket w/5.7L and A8 automatic
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The alternator on my 4,803 mile 2018 Challenger T/A seems to be doing fine....

In all seriousness.....MoPar OEM alternators seem to do fairly well and are of a decent quality. I had a 2014 RAM 3500 CTD w/362k miles on the stock alternator. My current 2018 RAM 4500 CTD is at 190k miles and is fine. Funny thing is......I’m not sure when I last replaced an alternator on any recent MoPar that I’ve owned.

If you decide to perform a preemptive replacement.....I’d heavily investigate going OEM.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
362K miles?!? That’s certainly impressive, but it does beg two questions:
1) are you the exception that proves the rule?
2) how can an exception to a rule prove that very same rule?

As far as which brand of replacement I’d be going with, I’ve looked at OEM, but all those are remans with 24 month warranty and still $450 w/ core charge, s&h, and tax.

The current front runner on my list is an ACDelco remanufactured Nippondenso unit with 12 month warranty for $300 TTL.
 

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typically what I've found that goes out in alternators (from my GM ownership years) - regulators or the rectifier pack.

Hot weather and high engine bay temperatures will usually lead to their demise

On a high mileage unit its probably brushes or bearings simply due to wear
 

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Discussion Starter #9
220 amps ?? Must be a police car thing???

si, este es verdad!

They come with the 220A alts and a bigger battery (850 CCA vs 800 CCA IIRC). I don’t run much with the engine off, so I opted for the regular sized battery when I replaced it a while back, but I gotta have the 220A to power all the audio amps I have mounted to the slide-out shelf in the trunk (another cop car perk).
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Alright it is done, no turning back now. I went with a reman Denso unit (2100785) that’s a match for my 4801834AB Mopar alt.

It’s 220A and has the clutch pulley, and the plug is in the correct position. With the core charge ($79!) it was right at $300 shipped, so I’m happy with the ultimate price point.

Now I just have to wait on it to get here and then stab it! 🤘
 

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Honestly, if you're not planning to sell it soon I would replace it. Even if it lasts you another 25k miles, you'll have 175k miles of worry free driving.

At least as far as the alternator is concerned.

Your muffler bearings might go out sooner than you think.
 

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I’m at 175K miles on the OE alternator (220A), and while it still works, I’m wondering how much longer it will live.

It’s had a hard life up until now, and it will continue to have a hard life until it dies or gets replaced (multiple audio amplifiers pushing it to its max and beyond regularly), and I would much rather replace it at my convenience rather than let it strand me in the middle of nowhere when it does eventually die.

I am curious if anyone has gotten 200K miles out of their OE 220A alt. Anyone?

How much beyond 200K miles did you get it?
I can't believe you'd mention alternators in my presence...
 

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I’m at 175K miles on the OE alternator (220A), and while it still works, I’m wondering how much longer it will live.

It’s had a hard life up until now, and it will continue to have a hard life until it dies or gets replaced (multiple audio amplifiers pushing it to its max and beyond regularly), and I would much rather replace it at my convenience rather than let it strand me in the middle of nowhere when it does eventually die.

I am curious if anyone has gotten 200K miles out of their OE 220A alt. Anyone?

How much beyond 200K miles did you get it?
If you remove a perfectly fine alternator while you remove one that is at some increased risk of failing due to "old age" you replace it with a new one, an alternator that has a higher risk to failing due to "infant death".

You can alleviate this risk some by if you replace the alternator do so when you have some time before your next long distance trip and you can use the car around town and give the new alternator time to fail closer to home.

If you are going to preemptively replace the alternator why not the fuel pump? Or the starter? Wheel bearing? Power steering pump? Steering rack? The car is equally "dead" or nearly so if any of these fail.

I have only replaced one alternator in around 1 million miles of driving. That was the factory alternator of my 2003 Porsche 996 Turbo. It failed (was unable to continue to supply sufficient electrical power so it could have "just" been a voltage regulator failure) at close to 160K miles. The fuel pump failed at closer to 100K miles.

Oh, check that. The alternator in my 2002 VW Golf TDi had to be replaced at under 150K miles. Not sure what happened other than for some reason the alternator V-belt wore out the alternator pulley and the car shed its V-belt somewhere west of Albuquerque on I-40. I managed to get the car the 15 miles into town. Being a diesel the car's electrical needs were low. I turned off the heater and unplugged the V1 and NAV unit to save battery power. The water pump was driven by the timing belt.

The dealer insisted the alternator had to be replaced, the pulley was not a serviceable item. I was too far from home and under time pressure to argue. Then I learned I had to pay an "expedite" fee to get the replacement alternator shipped by something faster than mule train. (Shortly after I got home I decided I had had enough of the consistently lousy VW service and sold the car.)
 

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If it ain't broke don't mess with it. Mine started having a bearing whine, I think it was around 140k. so I replaced it. A year later it quit charging, replaced again. That's proof enough, new doesn't guarantee anything. I ran my OEM battery 9 years, but the first time she grunted when starting I replaced it.
 

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I think you've proven it's a good one.
Since you have the luxury of time...
I would take it to that local guy that does alternators and truck starters and such and let him go through it. He would have the gear and experience to test, access, lube, and to change only the parts you need - from his selected stock.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
If it ain't broke don't mess with it. Mine started having a bearing whine, I think it was around 140k. so I replaced it. A year later it quit charging, replaced again. That's proof enough, new doesn't guarantee anything. I ran my OEM battery 9 years, but the first time she grunted when starting I replaced it.
Well, now that you mention it, I’m quite certain something in my charging system is broken...or at the very least inadequate for what I’m asking it to do.

My headlights dim with the heavy bass notes when I crank my stereo, and I’ve noticed the battery isn’t getting fully charged after running for a while and shutting off. It starts fine, but the battery voltage at rest is never more than 12.4 or 12.5 bolts.

So either the alternator is not working like it should or my wiring (either positive or ground or both) is not up to snuff. Since the mileage is so high on the current alternator, I figured I’d change it out for a new one to at least eliminate that variable as the problem.

If it fixes my issue, great. If not, I know I’ve got to look into upgrading the B+ wire from the alt back to the rear battery/PDC. (Already augmented the grounds with an extra #4 battery to chassis cable and two #6 engine to chassis cables)
 

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I've gone over 250K miles on original alternator without any issues on 4 Chevys. My Ford Expedition alternator died at 210K miles. My 2017 Challenger GT has 73K miles on it so far with no issues and I see 6,000+ rpms every day I drive it.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Cancel your current order and go with this.....

320A?? Never heard of such a thing...probably voodoo, and I’m not about no witchcraft!

besides, it’s too late to cancel, order is on the way!

984965
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I've gone over 250K miles on original alternator without any issues on 4 Chevys. My Ford Expedition alternator died at 210K miles. My 2017 Challenger GT has 73K miles on it so far with no issues and I see 6,000+ rpms every day I drive it.
I used to see 6K every day, but with the 2.65 rear gears and an A5 it just takes too long, relatively speaking, to get there while tooling around town. So I used my TranZformer to dial back the AutoUpshift RPM to 5500.

Now I can enjoy some 2nd gear scratch with ease and not have to wrap her up so tight each time!
984967


984966
 
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