Dodge Challenger Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'll start by stating credit for this modification idea goes to RockanRoll. The purpose of this post is to provide systematic instructions for those desiring to replicate this modification to their Challenger. This modification will convert the rather useless OEM fog lamps into high-visibility driving lights while adding a retro touch. The modification is not permanent. If for any reason you would like to return your fog lamps to their original state, the modification can be reversed by simply peeling the silicone adhesive from its channel and removing the lens.

There are several different lenses on the market you can use for this modification, however I have the Peterson lenses to best replicate the OEM 1970 Challenger parking lamp lenses with the raised bump in the center. Other versions feature a conical or flat face and/or beveled edges. Some have had luck pressing similar lenses into the fascia holes or attaching them with a strip of tape around the edge, however there is some risk of losing a lens when encountering a hard bump or contact with the front fascia (such as waxing or spoiler curb contact). Regardless of the lens used, the fog lamp assembly aim adjustment screw and tab will prevent the lens from sitting flush on the OEM fog lamp lens surface, resulting in a slight downward tilt and blockage of the aim adjustment screw. The procedure below will attach the lens in a flush, watertight, and secure manner while allowing screwdriver access for future fog lamp aim adjustments.

Note: Steps 13-15 are only necessary if you wish to retain the aim adjustment feature. Omitting these steps will result in blockage of the aim adjustment screw by the amber lens. While the fog lamps will no longer project a beam with the amber lenses installed, the light brightness may not appear symmetrical to the eye (between the two sides) if the aim between the assemblies differs, thus necessitating an aim adjustment.

Required parts:

-2x Peterson Manufacturing Company amber signal lenses (p/n 338-15A). These can be found at trailer parts suppliers, however I found Amazon to have the best price (Amazon.com: Peterson Mfg Co 338-15a Repl Lens: Automotive)

-3M Clear Super Silicone Adhesive, 3 oz. (p/n 08661)


Tools:

-7mm hex driver or socket
-10mm hex driver or socket
-T20 torx driver or socket
-Trim clip removal tool (to remove clips)
-Dremel rotary tool
-Dremel cutoff wheel
-Dremel 430 1/4" sanding drum with 446 240-grit sanding drum
-Dremel 194 high-speed cutter
-Scissors
-Thin cardboard
-Fine tip marker
-Ruler or tape measure
-Masking tape
-Isopropyl alcohol
-Lint-free cloth

Instructions:

1. Raise front of vehicle with ramps, jacks stands, or a lift
2. Remove 4x 10mm bolts, 9x 7mm bolts, and 10x push clips securing the front and aft undercarriage covers
3. Remove front and aft undercarriage covers by sliding them aft
4. Unplug fog lamp harnesses from lamp socket
5. Unscrew 4x (2x ea.) T20 torx screws retaining fog lamp assemblies to the front fascia
6. From the rear, squeeze the three retaining clips inward while pushing the fog lamp assembly out the front

7. Label each fog lamp assembly to ensure installation into the same location later. Each fog lamp is individually aimed at the factory and they may not be at the same setting.
8. Make a template to notch the lens top for fitment around the OEM lens aim adjustment tab
9. Mark the center of the lens (the right side of the "N" in the PN) to ensure the DOT number is centered at the bottom
10. Tape template to lens edge, centered on your mark.
11. Using a Dremel cutoff wheel (or similar), slowly make two notches 1/4" apart and 5/32" deep following the template
12. Using a Dremel high-speed cutter, remove the tab left in the middle
13. Using a small Dremel sanding drum, make a very shallow indentation on the top of the lens. This will allow screwdriver access for future fog lamp assembly aim adjustments. This step may be omitted, however the assembly will no longer be adjustable, as the lens will partially cover the adjusting screw head.
14. Clean all cuts with a small fine file
15. Polish indentation with a plastic polish to match the rest of the lens. If using a Dremel, frequently add polishing compound to prevent heat buildup and melting of the plastic from friction heat. I used MAAS for initial polishing followed by a dedicated plastic lens polish.


16. Clean both lenses and fog lamp assemblies very well with dish soap (to strip wax, cleaners, etc.). Be sure to thoroughly dry the inside lens grooves to prevent hard water stains or fogging if immediately proceeding to the next step.
17. Clean mating surfaces with isopropyl alcohol using a lint-free cloth
18. Press lenses over fog lamps until resting fully on the fog lamp assembly face
19. While resting the fog lamp on its face, center lens by viewing and adjusting the side gaps from the rear.
20. Cut silicone tube nozzle at a 45° angle to create a bead of approximately 1/8-1/4". While resting your hand on the work surface, rotate the fog lamp assembly (on the lens face) while squeezing a bead of 3M Super Silicone Sealant around the gap.
21. Measure aim adjustment screw setting, annotate, and remove screw. Fill lens notch gap with silicone. Place fog lamp assemblies face down, re-center lens if necessary, and allow to dry 24 hrs.

22. Install fog lamp assembly into respective hole. Be sure to push the assembly in to engage the three snap tabs. Re-secure with 2x ea. T20 torx screws
23. Connect fog lamp assembly harnesses
24. Test fog lights
25. Re-install both undercarriage covers
26. Open beer (or another) and admire your work


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,788 Posts
lost me on step 2
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
It is the same modification, just with the Pilot brand lens (Pilot Automotive - Tail Lamp: NV-5092AR), which is more conical with a beveled edge. Regardless of the part brand, you need to secure the lens. Some have had luck with a small piece of tape around the inner edge of the amber lens, and some with mixed results by pressing the lens into the fog lamp holes. If you elect to tape or press the lens on instead of seal it with silicone, you "could" end up with dirt and water between the fog lamp clear lens and amber lens. Whatever lens brand or method is your choice. Other methods:

-Tint OEM housing lenses
-Amber bulbs (will only emit amber when operating)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
675 Posts
Yeah they definitely can pop out easy, went searching out in the barn and found a set of magnetic trailer lights I bought about 10 yrs ago and never even opened the package. Opened them up and poped out the lenses and they fit perfectly and look sharp too after testing them. I popped them off (they came out very easily) and I'm and going to wait till it warms up a bit and use put a dab of clear silicone around them to hold in there. Its raining and in the 40's today and I doubt that silicone will dry well in this weather.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,434 Posts
The OP's is probably the most 'proper' and the neatest way to do it. I simply cut circular pieces of industrial double-sided tape, about 1/2" in diameter, and glued them at the center of the lenses that I then applied to the existing fog light lenses. Looks great (what you see of the tape doesn't look weird, shaped the way it is), took very little time, is completely reversible, and when I had a cracked lense the replacement took a few minutes.

I used 4" amber Hella lenses from amazon.com at about $3 a piece. I like them because they're pretty flat.

My car being a DD that sees a lot of miles and road abuse, the cheap and nasty solution made the most sense to me. I wouldn't be comfortable simply wedging the lenses in place, though, or using dabs of glue.
 

Attachments

  • Like
Reactions: NickR/T

·
Registered
http://www.dragtimes
Joined
·
1,899 Posts
Isn't adding another lense making "the rather useless OEM fog lamps" even more useless?
Why not just put an orange bulb in?
I use my fog lights a lot as lights at the track so unless you're putting in a stronger bulb, I can't see it producing more light.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,434 Posts
It's purely for the retro look as far as I'm concerned. Most people who do this mod seem to have the same motivation. Fog is rarely an issue in my area and so the lights are more like driving lights. I only use them on tight roads at night to make sure that people see me. It's therefore not about output - I thought about putting some LEDs in there, but upgrading the headlights would be much more productive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,119 Posts
I retro my lights to orange and also moved my fog lights to where my brights where and where my fogs where is where my parking lights are and my turn singles are like they where in 1970 challenger was old school look and have a 1970 hood on mine also lots of old school look
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Isn't adding another lense making "the rather useless OEM fog lamps" even more useless?
Why not just put an orange bulb in?
I use my fog lights a lot as lights at the track so unless you're putting in a stronger bulb, I can't see it producing more light.
Yep, as USRWDV8 stated, it is purely for the retro look. The 1970 Challenger featured amber parking lamps where our new Challenger fog lamps reside. Simply changing the bulb will only provide the retro look when illuminated. Some other forum members have even re-wired the fog lamps to become the turn signals after this modification. With the amber lenses, the fog lamps will no longer project light outward in a beam, but become high-visibility amber driving lamps much like the new Dodge Dart.

Maybe those with the standard headlights have found the OEM fog lamps useful, however with my factory HID headlights you can barely notice any difference when the fog lamps are turned on, even in dense fog. In 19 years of driving all over the world, I have only had one instance where I could have really used a set of fog lamps. As far as I'm concerned, they are nothing but a fad anyway, as most people drive with them on all the time regardless of visibility.
 
  • Like
Reactions: USRWDV8

·
Registered
http://www.dragtimes
Joined
·
1,899 Posts
I get it, guess I'm one of the ones that functionally use them. Not a big fan of headlights HIDs or other types in the lanes or going down the track. Just wish they were a tad brighter. (old eyes).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
304 Posts
The OP's is probably the most 'proper' and the neatest way to do it. I simply cut circular pieces of industrial double-sided tape, about 1/2" in diameter, and glued them at the center of the lenses that I then applied to the existing fog light lenses. Looks great (what you see of the tape doesn't look weird, shaped the way it is), took very little time, is completely reversible, and when I had a cracked lense the replacement took a few minutes.

I used 4" amber Hella lenses from amazon.com at about $3 a piece. I like them because they're pretty flat.

My car being a DD that sees a lot of miles and road abuse, the cheap and nasty solution made the most sense to me. I wouldn't be comfortable simply wedging the lenses in place, though, or using dabs of glue.

All these ideas are good, but this seems like a good way to mod! I used amber stained glass paint on mine for my 2011 GWE Challenger (still looks good after 3 years), but if I did this again would go with what you have suggested here ... just for simplicity ! :guiness:
 
  • Like
Reactions: USRWDV8

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
fog lamp mod

Check out my thread about four or five pages back. I actually modified my turnsignals into the foglight housings,and moved the foglights to the inner headlights. My lights look and function like an original Challenger. The thread was called I made my Challenger more like an original.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
598 Posts
Check out my thread about four or five pages back. I actually modified my turnsignals into the foglight housings,and moved the foglights to the inner headlights. My lights look and function like an original Challenger. The thread was called I made my Challenger more like an original.
This is what I want to do. I can't stand having the "high beams" position being used as turn signals. Really cheesy but I just haven't had a chance yet to change it. Not sure even why Chrysler did that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,434 Posts
Fyi: in California the front turn signals have to be mounted no less than 15" from the ground.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
I am also interested in this modification, but have deferred purchasing or modifying anything until deciding the route I would like to take. For those desiring to change the turn signals, you have two options. You can re-wire the turn signals to the fog lamps or go with a switch-back bulb setup, providing white light from the inner headlight (when headlights or parking lights are on, or daytime running lights are activated) and amber only when the turn signals are activated.

USRWDV8 raises a valid point. Legally, I would be extremely surprised if any police officer knew this legality, recognized your Challenger's turn signals have been moved to the fog lamps, and issued a ticket accordingly. Just beware you may be in violation of a state law and do your homework first. Safety-wise, drivers in front of you may not see the turn signals at closer distances with the signals completely moved to the fog lamps.
 
  • Like
Reactions: USRWDV8

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,272 Posts
ordered two sets of lens covers yesterday...$6 for both off Amazon
 
  • Like
Reactions: USRWDV8

·
Registered
2012 Dodge Challenger R/T classic
Joined
·
4 Posts
999410


Did the retro mod on my Challenger today for $7 at tractor supply you can buy just the amber lenses and they fit right over the foglights with no adhesive required.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top