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I stopped after a 25 minute drive back to my neighborhood for the ice house. after about 30 minutes there and two beers later I left for home. But everyone wanted to hear my engine, so I cranked it up and let it idle for maybe 20 seconds and then reved it to 5000 rpm for a second only. Does this hurt the engine?
 

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You have caused severe internal damage, shortening the engines life span by at least 20,000 miles.


I hope it was worth it. Think again before showing off.
 

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My answer would be "absolutely not". I'd have to see some serious evidence to make me believe otherwise.
 

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The thing that stood out to me most in the OPs post isn't the revving of the engine, harmless; but the two beers in thirty minutes then driving, hmm, now that's something I'd wonder about. Especially if worried about causing damage, not just to the motor.


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So i guess getting a Dyno is out of the question.
Have you ever seen a dyno? Notice how there are rollers for the wheels? I mean, it would be pretty difficult to get horsepower and torque outputs by revving the engine in neutral.

Therefore, a dyno does not cause the catastrophic consequences that revving the engine in neutral does. If Chrysler found out about this they would void the warranty on the drivetrain.
 

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Lucky he didn't rev it to 5200 or he'd be fishing the broken timing chain out of the oil pan with a coat hanger...
 

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Have you ever seen a dyno? Notice how there are rollers for the wheels? I mean, it would be pretty difficult to get horsepower and torque outputs by revving the engine in neutral.

Therefore, a dyno does not cause the catastrophic consequences that revving the engine in neutral does. If Chrysler found out about this they would void the warranty on the drivetrain.
LOL You are too funny.
 

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It sounds like you're a young lad. Now two beers in 30 minutes and trying to show off behind the wheel, especially if you weight under 140lbs, is asking for trouble. Not wise.
As far as revving the engine, yeah you don't wanna pass 4500. Dealers have a way of finding out. They know as soon as they hook up your car to their computer. Warranty voided on the spot.


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Have you ever seen a dyno? Notice how there are rollers for the wheels? I mean, it would be pretty difficult to get horsepower and torque outputs by revving the engine in neutral.

Therefore, a dyno does not cause the catastrophic consequences that revving the engine in neutral does. If Chrysler found out about this they would void the warranty on the drivetrain.
Bro I'm sure he was joking when he said, "guess a dyno is out of the question".


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When you're activating the launch control on a 6 speed and applying full throttle with the clutch in, isn't it just like free revving the engine? So is this hurting the engine also?
 

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free wheeling any engines at rpms without load isnt necessarily a good thing, not something one should make a habit off....
Luke
 

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When you're activating the launch control on a 6 speed and applying full throttle with the clutch in, isn't it just like free revving the engine? So is this hurting the engine also?
I see where your coming from. In short, no, your not hurting the engine with a M6 during launch control. If you notice the max for the 6speed using that feature is 4500 RPM. Not sure what technology is used to limit it but my guess would be spark or something electronic. Also another reason is when you do engage launch control it's only for a short steady time and level. When you "freewheel" the motor its easy for the engine speed to vary, dramatically which I'm sure is not a very good thing. Revving high and low with almost no reliable steady control.


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