Dodge Challenger Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
652 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Got a brand new set of Michelin Super Sports. At 5,000 miles, I had the tires rotated and started noticing that it was pulling to the right. Took it in, and got an alignment- no change, it still pulls hard to right. They told me probably it was the tires. What would make the car pull to one side after a rotation? Going to take my car to Discount Tire (where I bough them). Any info helpful. My car has 65,000 miles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
324 Posts
Belts on the tires could be defective. Radial pull could be the cause? Hope this makes sense?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
Not out of balance themselves, but can magnify the effect on pulling. If tires are not perfect, the road will make it pull. More tire pressure can have an effect. Re-balancing the wheel usually helps solve the problem if one isn't trying to buy a new tire. I hope I'm explaining it right, lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,449 Posts
It is definitely a radial tire pull. Cross rotate the front tires, the Pilots aren't directorial, they just have an outside sidewall mounting requirement. That will fix your pull.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,072 Posts
When radial tires first come on the market back in the day. ( which I remember) as a tech, I was instructed to never X radial tires. They develop a run pattern in the belts (directional). when revered by rotating them it basically cause them to wrinkle when they roll making them pull. The new trend is to say all is good turn them which ever way you want! It is still not a good idea. front to rear rear to front same side. Remember that the MFG of the tires, wants to sell tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
See step 2, it's ok to cross them for evaluation purposes, and notice tire balance isn't mentioned at all.


Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,975 Posts
When radial tires first come on the market back in the day. ( which I remember) as a tech, I was instructed to never X radial tires. They develop a run pattern in the belts (directional). when revered by rotating them it basically cause them to wrinkle when they roll making them pull. The new trend is to say all is good turn them which ever way you want! It is still not a good idea. front to rear rear to front same side. Remember that the MFG of the tires, wants to sell tires.
No offense but I believe that is a dated mentality. It spread because Firestones back then had a belt defect, and would blow after cross rotation because that was the catalyst that sped up the inevitable failure. But people thought the cross-rotation was the cause. Anyway, a big reason why so few cars have directional tires from the factory anymore is so that you can cross rotate. Keeping it out of a set wear pattern is the goal. Tires don't just wear different front-to-back, they wear different side-to-side too. Keeping even tread keeps the diffs happy, and helps keep the steering even and predictable. The last thing you want is more traction on one side than the other when you hit standing water or something. Side to side rotation helps eliminate edge wear and feathering as well. There are probably multiple other reasons why tire companies, FCA, and other OEMs recommend it, but that's the way I see it anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,072 Posts
No offense but I believe that is a dated mentality. It spread because Firestones back then had a belt defect, and would blow after cross rotation because that was the catalyst that sped up the inevitable failure. But people thought the cross-rotation was the cause. Anyway, a big reason why so few cars have directional tires from the factory anymore is so that you can cross rotate. Keeping it out of a set wear pattern is the goal. Tires don't just wear different front-to-back, they wear different side-to-side too. Keeping even tread keeps the diffs happy, and helps keep the steering even and predictable. The last thing you want is more traction on one side than the other when you hit standing water or something. Side to side rotation helps eliminate edge wear and feathering as well. There are probably multiple other reasons why tire companies, FCA, and other OEMs recommend it, but that's the way I see it anyway.
Actually it is a result of driven wheels vs non driven wheels. the rear wheels as most back then were, put a twist in the radial belts of the tires, in the direction of rotation. Then when you move the tire to the opposite side the belts try to adjust to the new rotation and in some case's bunch up and cause what we referred to as a "radial pull" It was very common and affected all brands. The newer generations of radial tires are not as susceptible to this as they improved the way they wrap the wire in the belts. but it still happens. And the best guard against it is to H the tires from front to rear and rear to front.Cars like the Challenger with independent front and rear suspension wear side to side front and back anyway. As I stated. It is not as big of a problem as it use to be but it still occurs with some tires. A good way to find out is to move it around and see if the problem moves with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,975 Posts
Actually it is a result of driven wheels vs non driven wheels. the rear wheels as most back then were, put a twist in the radial belts of the tires, in the direction of rotation. Then when you move the tire to the opposite side the belts try to adjust to the new rotation and in some case's bunch up and cause what we referred to as a "radial pull" It was very common and affected all brands. The newer generations of radial tires are not as susceptible to this as they improved the way they wrap the wire in the belts. but it still happens. And the best guard against it is to H the tires from front to rear and rear to front.Cars like the Challenger with independent front and rear suspension wear side to side front and back anyway. As I stated. It is not as big of a problem as it use to be but it still occurs with some tires. A good way to find out is to move it around and see if the problem moves with it.
Sounds reasonable, perhaps it's just the way things change. I figured the anti-crossing idea was just from the Firestone blowouts, but I may be mistaken. At work we simply follow what the OEM recommends, which on a Challenger (Not staggered) would be cross to the rear and straight the front.

Anyway, tire conicity is something a road force balancer can detect. You're right, it does affect all brands and we do see it at work quite a bit. Even on new tires. That might be all it is.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top