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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I ran across the thread here on the forum “See Where They Rust” which sent me into research mode to see how I could possibly re-mediate the issue. I have an idea that I think will work and thought I would share the idea here either for people to use or maybe have some of the great minds here on the forum provide feedback to improve or debunk the solution.

Looking at the problem area I see there are multiple points where there is access to the area. There are points all along the rocker panels where the Rocker Cladding connects. There is also a plug on the top side of the rocker panel inside the door.

The product fluid film is a great product to fight rust. It actually stops rusting that has already begun and can find its way into all of the hard to reach crevices etc...

So my idea is to use fluid film and using the extension wand spray into each of the holes along the rocker panel. The Fluid Film should reach all of the areas that have the issue with rust. Additionally the foam should absorb the fluid film hopefully getting saturated with the fluid film and resist absorbing moisture. So not only will it stop absorbing moisture but it will be filled with the rust inhibitor to aid in ongoing rust prevention.

Fluid Film: https://www.fluid-film.com/automotive-applications/

I have attached pictures so you can see where the access points are and pics with the rear quarter removed showing where the foam is.
 

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I would certainly try this out on scrap material or in a small non visable area first before applying it to my car in mass. Certain chemicals, even ones that may seem to be harmless, can react with Paint, clear coats, foam, adhesives & sealants in bad ways & sometimes its not immediate.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I would certainly try this out on scrap material or in a small non visable area first before applying it to my car in mass. Certain chemicals, even ones that may seem to be harmless, can react with Paint, clear coats, foam, adhesives & sealants in bad ways & sometimes its not immediate.
Thats the reason I chose Fluid Film.. its been around for years.. tried and true.

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I’m interested in seeing if this can work. I’m also curious to know if the foam can be removed for our cars as well.


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I saw the "where they rust" thread and am going to use fluid film. Mine is a 14 and doesn't see a winter. But I noticed a tiny spec of rust on the pinch weld by the quarter. I inspected it the best I could and it seemed to just wipe off and is not rotted. But I am going to spray fluid film it in there.
 

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The only issue I see with some types of undercoating is you have to make sure you just don't move the issue to another location by blocking some of the existing drain holes. Not sure if there would be any in a panel they already filled with foam but I would determine where they are before filling any open space with a new product that might block them. My Javelin was completely rust free except one spot where the drain hole was plugged with debris and trapped water against the unpainted panel. I live in rust free Las Vegas but still plan to protect my new Challenger against future rust damage as more info gets out about the current issues. I am from Michigan and I hate rust.
 

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I might be an experimental vehicle on this.

On the drivers side I used to compressed air and various pipes, tubes and nozzles to blow as much of the foam out of the sill / rocker. I then sprayed Noxudol 700 cavity wax inside using a pressurised pot and a couple of lances and wands.

On the passenger side, I sprayed the open hole where the skirts plug in with 3M underbody shultz/coating, lots of it, so seal the foam. I then clipped the skirts / rocker cover back on into the wet coating, so it should seal around them.

On both sides I blocked up the unused holes (and there's a fair few, rectangular and round) with bitumen patches. I also used butyle strip to seal the cover to the quarters at the top.

If you remove the rear wheel inner arch liners, and look up inside the arch (pretend you are the wheel, looking up and out to the inside of the rear quarter over the wheelarch - either side of the petrol/gas filler sheet metal) , you will see bitumen patches covering a hole towards the front of the arch and one to the rear. On mine, both patches were misaligned, not properly stuck, and generally falling off.

So water when being driven in heavy rain, snow, sluch, that makes it up there as a good chance of making it in and down inside the rear quarter, down on top of the foam. Blocked mine again with bitumen patches, then covered the whole inside of the arch with the 3M coating where stones would get it, and underbody wax where the liners protected it.

I've covered the underside with similar - I was quite surprised at the number of ledges, recesses and gaps under the car that would hang on to silt and dirt washed up from the road - salt hangs around on our road over here in winter - having owned a Lancia for over 25 years, I know a thing or two about keeping a car rust free now ;-)
 

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Fluid Film works pretty good I hear but works best on a vehicle that hasn't seen much salt or wet weather, like a new one. Also best to apply it during the spring. I make it easy on myself and pay the $300 to have my local bodyshop take care of it and they'll get it done at the best times before the humidity sets in. They also can pull off any panels they need to because they got the experience in that.
 

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Undercoating shops were pretty common in Michigan but I have to say I've never seen one in Las Vegas. They might have some but I do most of my own work anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I might be an experimental vehicle on this.

On the drivers side I used to compressed air and various pipes, tubes and nozzles to blow as much of the foam out of the sill / rocker. I then sprayed Noxudol 700 cavity wax inside using a pressurised pot and a couple of lances and wands.

On the passenger side, I sprayed the open hole where the skirts plug in with 3M underbody shultz/coating, lots of it, so seal the foam. I then clipped the skirts / rocker cover back on into the wet coating, so it should seal around them.

On both sides I blocked up the unused holes (and there's a fair few, rectangular and round) with bitumen patches. I also used butyle strip to seal the cover to the quarters at the top.

If you remove the rear wheel inner arch liners, and look up inside the arch (pretend you are the wheel, looking up and out to the inside of the rear quarter over the wheelarch - either side of the petrol/gas filler sheet metal) , you will see bitumen patches covering a hole towards the front of the arch and one to the rear. On mine, both patches were misaligned, not properly stuck, and generally falling off.

So water when being driven in heavy rain, snow, sluch, that makes it up there as a good chance of making it in and down inside the rear quarter, down on top of the foam. Blocked mine again with bitumen patches, then covered the whole inside of the arch with the 3M coating where stones would get it, and underbody wax where the liners protected it.

I've covered the underside with similar - I was quite surprised at the number of ledges, recesses and gaps under the car that would hang on to silt and dirt washed up from the road - salt hangs around on our road over here in winter - having owned a Lancia for over 25 years, I know a thing or two about keeping a car rust free now ;-)
Thanks for sharing, I'm going to check out the products you listed. I took a quick look at Noxudol 700, it seems very similar to Fluid Film.
 

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Rust Quarter panel & rims

I also have the RUST problem on the rear quarter panels. I wonder if I vinyl wrap my next challenger entirely will this help? I think it'd still happen. Has to do with the drainage holes? So the holes should be plugged?
 

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It's my daily driver. 2009 170,000+ miles. Look at it! What a disgrace!
That looks absolutely disheartening. What area do you live in?
 

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This rust issue is probably my biggest long-term concern with my 2018 Challenger. I know they redesigned the rear-wheel-well area a little in the 2015+ models, but not sure it's changed enough to eliminate this rust problem. My understanding is that it rusts from the inside out, so putting a wrap on the car won't avoid the issue either - in fact nothing you do to the outside of the car would avoid it - no matter how well you take care of the paint. It's obviously a design flaw where water is getting in there and staying there, causing the body panel to rust from the inside out. I typically keep my cars a long time so this issue is definitely a concern. There is no way a well-kept 9-year old car should rust like that in this day and age - and it appears to be a somewhat-common issue from what I've seen on the forums, which is very unfortunate.

I have seen a thread where someone basically replaced the rocker panels and sealed all holes underneath them really well - maybe that is the "solution" (if, in fact, this is still a somewhat-common issue on the 2015+ Challengers - we really won't know for a few more years though). Originally, I wasn't going to bother with that rocker panel replacement and re-seal, but maybe I should consider it.
 

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This is why I brought up a while back about Dodge putting out an all wheel drive GT..I mean if there are RWD Challenger's having rust problems..I hope they did something to try to mitigate it more in the GT's seeing as how people would prob be driving them in the snow. My R/T is a 2013...I never drive it in the rain...it's garage kept...barely has 20,000 miles on the car and I have a small bump on the passenger rear quarter down low...not sure if it's rust coming through but it feels like it is. I too was planning on keeping this car pretty much forever....it's damn disheartening...
 

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My 2018 is a GT and I will be driving it year-round in Pennsylvania, so I'll know soon enough about the rust... I have a feeling that nothing is different with the GT's in this respect though...
 

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My 2018 is a GT and I will be driving it year-round in Pennsylvania, so I'll know soon enough about the rust... I have a feeling that nothing is different with the GT's in this respect though...

Yes I have not heard or seen anything about any changes on the assembly line with these cars in that regard...enjoy your GT! Hopefully you won't have any problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Kind of ironic that this post was responded to at this time. I just replaced my rocker cladding and worked on my rustproofing idea. I actually used Amsoil HD Metal protector, primarily becuase I'm familar with how it works. anyway I was able to just use the straw and work it down into foam. I figured that was safe to use to avoid scratching any of the surface inside. Also with the number of access points I could reach all areas of the rocker panel using just that.

The Amsoil HD metal protector sprays out as a liquid then forms a firm amber film so it is easily absorbed by the foam. I soaked it until it began to run out of the seam along the bottom of the rocker. I jacked the car up at the rear and soaked it so it would run to the front and then I switched to the rear jacking up the front of the car then finished with it level. I also used flex seal tape and sealed off the 3 holes toward the bottom of the rocker (note:2015 and later have more openings in the rockers as the cladding uses more clips). Those holes may not be there on the later years.

I also pulled the sound deadner out of the rear quarter panel under the wheel liner. There was some rust there that I cleaned up and sealed the area off with a few coats of Eastwood Rust Encapsulator then finished with a couple of coats of the metal protector (it works really well as an undercoating).

Finally I pulled the plastic panels off that is under the car just behind the front wheels and just in front of the rear. Everthing looked good under there, they actually have those designed to flow and drain really well. I think the issues with rust behind the front wheels is missed paint chips that developed rust. I should also mention I had to clean and hit a few of the seams under the car and hit it with the rust encapsulator.

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Discussion Starter #19
My 2018 is a GT and I will be driving it year-round in Pennsylvania, so I'll know soon enough about the rust... I have a feeling that nothing is different with the GT's in this respect though...
My wife has a 2019 Charger GT. I checked up under her car to compare it to my Challenger. They have the newer models sealed up quite a bit better, I assume they have done the same for the Challengers. For example the rockers are sealed completely the enire length of the rocker. All of the componants are sealed/painted i.e control arms, axles, etc... From what I can tell they have made some changes from lessos learned and they set them up for more abuse from the elements. I would think they would use the same treatement for both lines of cars.

It's too bad their isn't a more cost effective solution to use instead of salt to treat the roads. It's so abusive to the cars and quite honestly it's hard on the roads, bridges, buildings and it does affect the surrounding lakes. Massive amonts dumped on the road is actually harmful to the envirnoment.
 

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"60 Years of Leadership in the Science of Corrosion Control

When the U.S. Navy needed to conquer the costs and delays of battling rust and corrosion in the ballast tanks of its thousands of combat and support vessels in World War II, an innovative West Coast chemist formulated a powerful weapon based on an unlikely ingredient: lanolin (wool wax).

The savings were immediate. The costs of chipping, sealing and painting were greatly reduced. The new film penetrated corrosion and rust quickly. Application was simple. Protective action was long lasting and economical."

From their website
 
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