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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Would like to hear peoples input from those that have had this form of rust proofing done,ie were they happy with the results or did it leave just a mess on the floor pan,did they have it done without the drilling of access holes to panels,
Thinking of having it done by Rust Check in Toronto Ontario,even though the car goes into winter hibernation it cant hurt
This is not engine oil but a special form of oil they have been using for several years,your input would be great.
Remember Neil Youngs very words "Rust Never Sleeps"
 

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I've heard it makes a mess of your undercarriage. Don't let them drill holes in your frame either. It just leaves the door open for future rusting. There was a company in the states that did something similar and they went out of business cuz of all the frames rotting out of the cars. The company was called Rusty Jones.
 
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With modern rustproofing techniques used in the factory, along with rust-proof warranties, I think that supplementary rust proofing is a waste of money.
 

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I had it done on mine, they actually did a really nice job and it almost looks like it came that way, not that many ppl see under your car. I figured I would be keeping the car for so long I may aswell get it done.

It may not be necessary, I don't know for sure, but my '02 Jeep has rust spots underneath.. Not something I ever want to see on my Challenger.
 

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My thoughts on rustproofing is that it's so easy for the material to trap moisture in either by clogging drain holes or allowing moisture to collect in a seam. It's not worth the expense in my opinion as all modern cars resist rust much better than cars made as recently as 10 years ago.
 

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I had rust inhibitor and undercoating done before taking delivery of my car. Where I live, winter road conditions are brutal, so I figured every little bit helps. It's not an oil - more like a sticky, waxy rust inhibitor.

My understanding is that, if you're going to do it, get it done when the car is new, or it will trap dirt and moisture.
 

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I use krown on my truck and it is 02 and looks like new, no rust at all.
 

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If you are not winter driving the car then it is probably a waste of money unless you do a lot of driving in the wet or the car is parked outside in the rain a lot. I drive mine year round wet, dry, snow or no so I had mine rust proofed and undercoated. As stated above the rustproofing agent is not an oil but a waxy solution applied through drilled holes into the panels. One hole at each end of the rocker panel. One hole midway up the a-pillar post. One hole midway up the door post. Four holes across the trunk opening ledge. The holes are plugged with plastic plugs and don't look bad. The seams along the door bottoms, hood lip and trunk lip are treated with a clear barrier coating to prevent moisture from being trapped in the seam gap. I have yet to investigate, but I know that they removed the trunk liners from the sides of the trunk for access to the quarter panels.

I seriously doubt that a rust proofing treatment done correctly on a new vehicle would promote rust. Also if you look at the drain holes in the body there would have to be an extreme amount of anything introduced into a panel to actually plug those drains. And the frame from the factory is already filled with holes that are open to the elements and provide plenty of access points.

The only complaint I had about the work was undercoating over spray that wasn't wiped from the exhaust that caused quite a stink for awhile.

I'll let you know 20 years from now if the rust treatment caused my car to rot in half or not.
 

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I have to think its suspect to get it done. The newer cars are much less prone to rust. I have a 1997 Camry as my station car. Its never been garaged but washed once a week and it shows no rust. Living on Long Island's South Shore, it gets all the worst, dew, salt water dew, rain sleet snow and road salt. The older cars had rust problems but for the new ones, it seems to be a thing of the past.
 

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I have to think its suspect to get it done. The newer cars are much less prone to rust. I have a 1997 Camry as my station car. Its never been garaged but washed once a week and it shows no rust. Living on Long Island's South Shore, it gets all the worst, dew, salt water dew, rain sleet snow and road salt. The older cars had rust problems but for the new ones, it seems to be a thing of the past.
My 2002 Jeep Liberty would have to disagree with you.
 

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I think the integrity of the person trained to do the rustproofing is as important as the chemicals used. If the person cuts corners or isnt well trained you will have probems, if he takes pride in his work then it will be well worth it.
 

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I have to think its suspect to get it done. The newer cars are much less prone to rust. I have a 1997 Camry as my station car. Its never been garaged but washed once a week and it shows no rust. Living on Long Island's South Shore, it gets all the worst, dew, salt water dew, rain sleet snow and road salt. The older cars had rust problems but for the new ones, it seems to be a thing of the past.
I live in Western PA and they use salt and other chemicals (calcium chloride?) on the roads. I normally do get the oil/wax treatment on our vehicles but didn't on my wifes because everyone was telling my it wasn't necessary on todays cars. Don't believe them, I am surpised at how much rust is on the underside. Nothing that is risking structural (yet) but give it a few years and it might be....My recommendation is if you drive in the winter where they chemically treat roads, get it done.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I live in Western PA and they use salt and other chemicals (calcium chloride?) on the roads. I normally do get the oil/wax treatment on our vehicles but didn't on my wifes because everyone was telling my it wasn't necessary on todays cars. Don't believe them, I am surpised at how much rust is on the underside. Nothing that is risking structural (yet) but give it a few years and it might be....My recommendation is if you drive in the winter where they chemically treat roads, get it done.
Thanks to everyone for their input,while my Challenger goes into winter hibernation till mid March,my daily beater [97 gmc safari} gets Rust Checked ,my big concern with oil spraying was the mess it will leave on the floorpan..but I guess the trade-off beats body rot.
Couldnt handle my baby covered in road salt,the amout of road salt in Ontario some winters is just insane and its not untill mid April the roads are finally clear of this crap.
 

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...my big concern with oil spraying was the mess it will leave on the floorpan..
The mixture my guy uses is almost like cosmoline and only drips for about the first couple of days and not very much at that. I do this on my trucks because they see all the winter driving. The Challenger will not see any salt so it isn't going to get treated. My truck is an '03 Dodge 4x4 quadcab and doesn't have any under rust at all...
 
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