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Can anyone give me any ideas on how to remove water spots from a Satin Black hood? Here is the backstory:

I use McGuire's Car Wash Shampoo when washing the Challenger, along with a DC water deionizer(DC-120) for a spotless rinse. early this month after soaping the car, I went to rinse it and realized that the DC unit had weak resin in it--and when the car dried it left water spots on the car. Arg! The new resin arrived, I put it in the DC unit and did the same wash routine this weekend. The car looks beautiful and dried spotless--but the water spots on the satin black hood from the previous wash remain.
Anyone know of a product or of a way to get those spots out? Apparently re-washing the car with the McGuires and using the de-ionized water did not work. Is there a safe compound that you know of that I can use to get those water spots out? I have not tried anything else yet.

Thanks
 

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I had a matte black motorcycle and I used Dr. Beasley’s on it and that always seemed to remove water spots.
 

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wash it

Go to the Dr.Beasley's site.

I have a 2016 HELLCAT and I only use that stuff on my hood and wheels.
There is a Black Matt soap and after wash and in between wash.
It has been great stuff for me.
 

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Thanks for the info above. This is my first vehicle with matte paint and I have heard about the pains of keeping the matte taken care of. Do you use the matte wash for the whole car? I am guessing that will not be an issue but what do I know. The original owner added some clear paint protection but I am not sure what brand and he didn't do the whole car
 

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I'm having similar issues. Everyone says use Dr Beasley's. I'm using Dr Beasley's on my matte vinyl and it's causing streaking variations in the matte. You can see which way I wiped with the micro fiber, up and down, side to side or circular. It's a subtle variation in the matte, but its obvious if standing right next to the car and looking at it.

Whats the deal here?
 

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I have tried the Dr B's Film cleanser and Matte final finish. They both leave streaking across the surface. The final finish is worse. I emailed Dr B's but they haven't gotten back to be. Anyone have any input on this?
 

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At the dealership I worked at a couple of years ago the detailer gave me some type of cleaner that was an acid. He said it cost more than $100. A gallon. It smelled like a$$ and he mixed it with distilled water. You wet the car and sprayed it on in a very fine mist let it sit less then a minute, wipe it with a towel then trash the towel and wash it off. I had a water stain from the sprinklers (well water) on my wife’s car that I tried everything to remove. This stuff removed it like nothing. He said it’s amazing on glass also. A friend of mine at a body shop told me that bathroom lime remover works also and is cheap?
 

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Try some white vinegar..... Mildly acidic and will dissolve minerals.
Auto Geek sells a water spot remover that also works well.
 

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I had this problem use distilled white vinegar first this didn’t work for me tho. Water spot remover did work but like guy above said it uses acid so be careful and do a test spot.
 

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I have hard water and bought some 3D Auto Detailing Products Eraser Water Spot Remover 16 Oz - Gel. It helps but isn't instantaneous. I am a chemist and acid in COLD WATER and acid is the way to go for removing inorganic minerals.

The type found deposited on the heating elements of water heaters (scale) consists mainly of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). Hard water contains calcium (and often magnesium) bicarbonate or similar ions. Calcium salts, such as calcium carbonate and calcium bicarbonate (Ca(HCO3)2), are more soluble in hot water than cold water; thus, heating water does not cause calcium carbonate to precipitate per se. However, there is an equilibrium between dissolved calcium bicarbonate and dissolved calcium carbonate as represented by the chemical equation

Ca2+ + 2HCO3− ⇋ Ca2+ + CO32− + CO2 + H2O

where the equilibrium is driven by the carbonate/bicarbonate, not the calcium. Note that the CO2 is dissolved in the water. Carbon dioxide dissolved in water (dis) also tends to equilibrate with carbon dioxide in the gaseous state (g):

CO2(dis) ⇋ CO2(g)

The equilibrium of CO2 also moves to the right towards gaseous CO2 when the water temperature rises. When water that contains dissolved calcium carbonate is warmed, CO2 leaves the water as gas, causing the equilibrium of bicarbonate and carbonate to shift to the right, increasing the concentration of dissolved carbonate. As the concentration of carbonate increases, calcium carbonate precipitates as the salt: Ca2+ + CO32− ⇋ CaCO3.

As new cold water with dissolved calcium carbonate/bicarbonate is added and heated, the process continues: CO2 gas is again removed, carbonate concentration increases, and more calcium carbonate precipitates.
 

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Just washed my car and gave her another coat of Bead Maker. LOL then it rained 1" in 15 minutes. Soon as it stopped I blow dried it with the leaf blower so all good. Wonder if that will cut the life of my Bead Maker. Guess it doesn't I have a gallon of the stuff.
 
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