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I've heard Seafoam sprayed in the intake in newer vehicles may not be good, but what about using it just in the gas tank?
 

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And reasons for doing this is? I'm still learning
 

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And reasons for doing this is? I'm still learning

It's like a "winterizer" for the gas, and cleans the fuel system. My car sits a lot during the winter if there's snow and ice on the roads.


It's supposed to keep the gas stable for long periods, and when you do run your car, it helps clean the injectors etc.


Several products like this on the market, but I've been using this for years, and really like it.
 

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Ahhh I understand. Thanks for explaining!
 

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:thumbsup::thumbsup:
Your fuel comes with plenty of cleaners and solvents already, no need to add anything additional.
If you don't use "something" when leaving fuel in a engine/tank for long periods of time, all kinds of bad things can happen such as ethanol separating out, or varnishes separating out. It also helps to move accumulated water out of the tank and through the engine. Just look at how many people have to have the carburetors on their outboard motors serviced each spring and you'll see all of the people that didn't run something like sea-foam through the fuel system before winter.
That said, sea-foam is over-priced for me also, but I still use it for winterizing and occasionally run it through the cars just as a fuel system/fuel injector cleaner which is what the OP was asking about. :thumbsup:
 

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Seafoam is a fuel stabilizer as well as a solvent. It could be used just as well as something like Sta-Bil to keep the fuel from separating. It's incredibly expensive for what it is and there are cheaper alternatives for a stabilizer that work just fine.

However, fuel is far more stable these days than it used to be and over the course of a winter it is going to be just fine. It does not hurt to dump some in and fill the tank as part of winterizing, but not all that necessary these days.

From a solvent standpoint, fill the car with good gas from reputable stations and there is plenty of system solvents in there to begin with. Go with the top Chevron fuel every few fill-ups if you want to clean the fuel system, they include their Techron product in this.
 

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My challenger is in storage until I get back from Afghanistan. Currently using StarTron.
 

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If you're looking for a gas system treatment, you can't beat the Techron fuel system treatment. Fill your tank full of Chevron gas and then add it to your fuel system. The longer it sits, the better it works. I added it to my fuel when I went out of town for a week and when I came back the car idled smoother and my gas mileage went up a couple tenths. Granted, I only have 30K miles on it but I figured that I don't drive much and gas in the gas tank for long periods will cause sludge so I did it anyway. It was worth it just for the piece of mind.
 

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OK, I'll bite. First off, does anybody know why lead was added to gasoline??...If you said it was for valve guide lubricant you'd be wrong. The real reason lead was added was for octane stabilization. Ever remember having so much trouble with dirty lawnmower carbs when we were kids? That is if you were a kid before 1975. Answer:no, not unless it sat in the shed for years or was mixed with 2 cycle oil. Prior to 1975 lead stabilized octain and fuel resisted breakdown for substantially longer periods. Contemporary fuel begins to break down in as little as 30 days. But not all contemporary fuel dose. Aviation fuel is very stable, primarily because 13,000 feet at zero degrees is a lousy place to find out you've got a sour tank. Guess what they put in aviation fuel to insure its reliability?? LEAD!!
 

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I swear by SeaFoam. It has done magic smoothing out idle and throttle response. My pal Sam turned me onto it years ago. Sam was a brilliant mechanic, and constantly astounded me with his understanding and skill. And best of all...he worked the amco refinery south of Chicago for 26 years until they closed it. Sam knew a lot of stuff, but Sam defiantly knew Gas. Another trick he taught me was to buy 89 or 91 octane for the mower, weed whacker and chainsaw. Not because any of those things needed higher octane, but instead, to insure that after sitting around (past 30 days) they're have at least 87. Made sense to me, been doing it ever since, and can't remember the last time I had to clean a carb. Not all my Momma's children were pretty, but weren't none of them dumb. Irish
 
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