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Discussion Starter #21
Talk to the GM, not the service adviser, the "buck stops here" guy. Let him know what happened. If it isn't the company line, he may actually do something. If the service dept is just doing what they were told to do, wink, wink, nudge, nudge...it won't change anything.

The irony is, if they apologize and offer you some additional service...they are the ones doing said service!

If it's bothering you, and worth your time, let them know. Otherwise, by the sound of it, they haven't exactly shined in their service, taking care of your car...might be time to see how another dealer treats you

A Guy
thanks! one time I issued a complaint to the lead of the service department. Later the service advisor I use to go to at a different dealership no longer was there, no idea if it had anything to do with that or he was just incompetent and got a lot of other complaints.

I don't know who's really to blame the service advisor or the technician.

From what I heard the mechanics are sort of independent contractors, unless you are at a fancy dealership like Mercedes or something you provide your own tools and you get commission on services. So the more services you sell the more you get money.

The service advisor has a relationship with the mechanic, they are the voice and communicates to the customers. So it's like a sales job. Don't know if the service advisor is just the messenger and the mechanic is the one in fault. There is an e-mail listed on the bottom of the receipt.

It says did you receive excellent service with the email of the Service Director. Is it better to e-mail the GM of the Dealership? I'll have to see if I could find it online
 

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2018 Scat Pack SHAKER in Plum Crazy
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... Don't know if the service advisor is just the messenger and the mechanic is the one in fault. ...
It is the dealership that is at fault from your view. You leave it with them, you pay them. They are liable and they will make it up to you, not any one person. Now it is up to them to figure out (if they care and if it isn't all part of normal business) who is responsible on their end, not you.
I ran into something like this once in the past getting my 1993 Intrepid inspected. Brakes cracked but still thick enough, but failed due to cracks, rotors too thin to pass, not grooved, but worn too thin. All stuff that you can't just look at. I said "OK, I'll get the parts and be back when I'm done" They didn't expect me to not let them do the work. I pick up the parts on the way home, and when I tear it apart, no cracks, and I pulled out my micrometer, and rotors were safely in spec. The pads were cheap, I put them on, returned the rotors and chewed them out. I got the "what type of mic did you use, is it calibrated..." they were off like .025, not .001! I said, you show me how you mic'd them, I'll wait. Then huffed about and passed my car. Now, if I suspect anything up front, I say something like "let me know early so I can order parts" something to hint that I do my own work. And I hang around and try to watch.
 

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The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
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I’ve known some mechanics over the years, a few having worked at dealerships and loved to tell stories about their jobs. Based on those anecdotes, I’m thinking the situation probably unfolded something like this:

The service Dept puts out an edict to be vigilant on inspections to up their revenue on things like brake jobs and other preventative maintenance. The techs get the hint and start fluffing inspection reports in order to follow that edict. The service advisors aren’t actually telling them to do this fluffing of the reports, but they don’t ask many questions when one comes in. (This is on purpose, BTW.)

Now here’s what will likely happen if you bring the dealership’s attention to it:

In investigation will take place, I.e. the GM will ask the advisor what happened, and the advisor will ask the tech whats going on. The tech will say he doesn’t specifically remember the vehicle in question, but he will affirm that he stands by all his inspection reports. He’ll possibly be written up, or he won’t and just get a stern talking to. He won’t pull the same stunt for a while, but once a sufficient Amy of time has passed, he’ll probably start doing it again.

Meanwhile, you’ll be offered some package of service discounts to make you happy, but they are contingent on getting the work done there.

The only real mystery is whether or not you’ll accept their peace offering.

Personally, I would give the dealership a bad review and then never go back. That’s the best way to deal with it IMHO. Don’t let it occupy any more of your time, and you’ll win the best victory you can.
 

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IDK about that these days. I recently had a service issue with a Chevy dealer where I bought my son a new Camaro. Basically long story short, the service writer ****ed up when I brought the car in on its one year anniversary. I told them to do a state inspection, they never did, I picked the car up @ night in their dimly lit lot & didn't realize they never did it. My son got a ticket for no inspection. I asked them to get the car in ASAP for an inspection & reimburse me for the ticket. The service writer didn't work there any more but they went to the mat defending him. I didn't ask for cash. I told them give me a store credit. They wouldn't budge. When I asked them to get the car in ASAP for the inspection the soonest appt they offered my was a week. They told me I can take it anywhere for an inspection. I told them it wasn't that or the money. Its the point that they messed up and they weren't willing to do anything to make it right. I asked them if they are really willing to lose a customer over $50 and they flat out said yes. I posted bad reviews on Google, Yelp & Dealerrater. The GM responded to those saying they take these things very seriously. When I reached out to him directly he acknowledged they were in the wrong. He asked what it takes to make me happy. I told him a store credit for the ticket and I'll take the reviews down. I never heard back from him. Shortly after that, I was in the market for a caddy CT6. I took my business elsewhere

Meanwhile, you’ll be offered some package of service discounts to make you happy, but they are contingent on getting the work done there.
 

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2018 Dodge Challenger T/A Plus in Yellow Jacket w/5.7L and A8 automatic
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The car should be returned to the dealership and placed on a rack.

Then....the wheels should be removed, and the customer’s inspection report provided in full view to the service writer, the technician filling out the report, and, most importantly....the General Manager or Dealer Principal.

Upon the visual inspection by all parties, the car should be reassembled, lowered down, and backed out of the shop. At that time, @SRT8outtaLA you then tell them that you’ll not only NEVER darken their doorway, but you’ll share your experiences with everyone you know.
 
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The car should be returned to the dealership and placed on a rack.

Then....the wheels should be removed, and the customer’s inspection report provided in full view to the service writer, the technician filling out the report, and, most importantly....the General Manager or Dealer Principal.

Upon the visual inspection by all parties, the car should be reassembled, lowered down, and backed out of the shop. At that time, @SRT8outtaLA you then tell them that you’ll not only NEVER darken their doorway, but you’ll share your experiences with everyone you know.
Perfect! Accountability right there.
 
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