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Discussion Starter #1
Everytime we get precipitation and the temp is below freezing, my windows freeze to the seals on the lower edge of the door.

The smart glass can’t drop or raise when this happens.

Since there isn’t much else I can do, I’ve been keeping a dull plastic knife (like you get from MdDonalds) handy to gently separate the glass and seal. Now I realize that eventually this is going to be bad for the seal’s longevity, but it’s better than ripping the seal off the top of the door or breaking the side glass in 6* weather.

FCA - how about putting a heating element along that lower edge of the glass that fires up with the remote start (when temps are low) and/or with the heated mirrors?

That’d be great.
 

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probably carry an ice scraper to clear the glass above the weather strip (before opening door) to allow it to drop.

Odds are you have to scrape the windshield, side windows and rear glass to be able to see on that first drive of the day.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
probably carry an ice scraper to clear the glass above the weather strip (before opening door) to allow it to drop.

Odds are you have to scrape the windshield, side windows and rear glass to be able to see on that first drive of the day.
Even with the glass cleared above the door seal, the frozen area is in the door at the seal. I have to use something - credit card, McDonald's knife, etc to separate the seal and the glass before it will drop.
 

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When this happened to my Boxster I'd get in the car and turn on the key and push the lower window button concurrently with gently wiggling the glass to break the ice at the bottom of the window where the door/window seal was.

The ice would break and the window would lower just fine. Then I'd raise the window as far as it would go with the door open and then close the door and make sure it would raise the last 1/2" inch when I closed the door and lower 1/2" inch when I pulled on the door handle.
 

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It would be nice if the seal had a built in heater element...I mean, the side mirror have a heater...why not the felt seal?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
When this happened to my Boxster I'd get in the car and turn on the key and push the lower window button concurrently with gently wiggling the glass to break the ice at the bottom of the window where the door/window seal was.

The ice would break and the window would lower just fine. Then I'd raise the window as far as it would go with the door open and then close the door and make sure it would raise the last 1/2" inch when I closed the door and lower 1/2" inch when I pulled on the door handle.
I can't even get into the car until the window can drop. And I'm not a fan of pushing laterally on the window glass. The track is probably plastic (below freezing too!) and I've broken a side glass just slamming the door on an older car.
 

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I can't even get into the car until the window can drop. And I'm not a fan of pushing laterally on the window glass. The track is probably plastic (below freezing too!) and I've broken a side glass just slamming the door on an older car.
Even though the window didn't drop on my Boxster I could still open the door and get in. The top of the window would scrape against the bottom of the aluminum top rail but except for being the automotive equivalent of finger nails on a blackboard harmless.

One doesn't have to push hard at all on the glass. Just a gentle wiggle and one can hear/feel the ice break and the window becomes free.

I've never had my Challenger in those wintery conditions but if the window doesn't drop and the door then can't be opened you have to either find a way to thaw the ice or prevent the icing condition from happening.

Maybe a large squirt bottle of cold water would be sufficient? Or a battery powered heat gun? Hair dryer?

Or you need to find a way to keep the icing from happening. I looked into something to prevent icing of my Boxster's windows. One way is a car cover. Shortly after I bought my Boxster new in 2002 I bought a Porsche outside car cover for the car. This is a high quality cover but the problem is the car should be clean and dry before the cover is put on. I could guarantee the car would be clean and dry at the house when it was parked in a nice heated garage but once out in the elements the car would get messy as you know only cars driven in the winter can get.

Then I looked into some nice partial car covers that are intended to cover the top/side windows/doors. The cover can have rubber coated hooks that hook the fender lip (or some covers have a magnet at each corner) and hold the cover in place in wind. I forget the brand name, but a search turned up this:

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Formosa-Covers-Car-snow-cover-and-windshield-sun-shade-full-top-cover-fits-full-to-large-size-car/104666389?action=product_interest&action_type=title&beacon_version=1.0.2&bucket_id=irsbucketdefault&client_guid=274f98fc-cf49-44c8-3345-4b9713db8c8c&config_id=106&customer_id_enc&findingMethod=p13n&guid=274f98fc-cf49-44c8-3345-4b9713db8c8c&item_id=104666389&parent_anchor_item_id=262316604&parent_item_id=262316604&placement_id=irs-106-t1&reporter=recommendations&source=new_site&strategy=PWVAV&visitor_id=W8Gq-o0sPYWJcLF63ozbZU

However, I decided to use a large sheet of painter's plastic large enough to wad up the excess at the corners and shove in between the tire and wheel well at all 4 corners. To store the plastic with the car -- so I'd have it handy to use when I parked the car at work -- I put a 5 gallon plastic bucket in the trunk and shoved the plastic sheet in that. This kept any snow/ice on the plastic from making the trunk carpet damp.

This worked ok but just 2 months later I ended up buying a new 2002 VW Golf TDi that I used for bad weather driving and icing of the Boxster's side (and plastic rear) windows was no longer a concern.
 

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Yeah.....this is just one of those "oh crap....we should have thought this through a little better" features of the Challenger. For those of who would never consider driving our Challengers during or after frozen precipitation, this is a non issue. However, for those who drive them all winter, this is a feature that is not compatible with winter driving. If you have an automatic, you can remote start your car and assuming you have your HVAC set to blow max-hot air, as soon as it's warmed up, the windows should thaw enough to "smart lower". Alternately, you can pop the trunk and go through the back seat to get in. Other than that, you're stuck with the "locally applied" heat/liquid solutions.
I can imagine a heat trace that would work with the window or seal.
 

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Be real nice if the doors were framed around the window instead of leaving the glass to flex...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Thanks.

Gummi Pfledge? Guess it can’t hurt.

I have rainx laying around if it is still good. Is the shelf life of rainx >20 years?
 

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another product recommended is Aquapel
 

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Gummi Pfledge?

Just going through my box of Boxster "stuff" and found a tube of this. I've had it for years probably since 2002.

It is good stuff. I used Gummi Pfledge at the rubber seal up top where the window slides down then up against the seal as the door is opened then closed again. Also, used it to treat the rubbers seals at other locations too, the door seals, trunk seals, the clam shell seal, etc.

Never used it at the seal at the base of the side window though for I found as I detailed in a previous post a technique that worked when my car's side windows were frozen.

I will add that I found cleaning the glass where it contacts the top rubber seal helped a great deal to allow the glass to move up and down against the seal with no harm to the seal. Even after 16 years of almost always being parked outside sometimes not even under a carport the seals were still water and air tight. You might find waxing the glass at just above the door seal might help. Or as others have suggested Rain-X might be the way to go.

I'll stress you should find a solution that doesn't require you have to stick anything between the door, the seal, and the glass. The seal that keeps the glass/door interface water tight is very important. Compromise this seal and the door might fill up with water and this can create all kinds of problems.
 
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