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Discussion Starter #1
Hello I've recently purchased a 2012 sxt challenger with 119k miles. On the drive home I spun out and a branch punctured my radiator hose under the car. I didn't realize the damage until a week later after having my mufflers deleted. My car overheated on the same day as the muffler delete. Took car back to shop they lifted the car and noticed the extreme leak. Since then I've had the radiator, water pump, thermostat, temperature sensor, radiator hose, cap, oil housing, tensioner pulley, belts replaced and the system bleed numerous times and I still hear bubbling sound in the dash as if air is still getting in the system. I took car to dealership payed 160 for diagnostic only for them tell me drive it around and if it still overheats then it may be a warp head! I am TIRED of pouring my money into jobs thts not fixing the problem please HELP!

Symptoms:
car takes about 10-15 min for temp gauge to reach mid point so engine runs cold,
Horrible fuel consumption
Stalled acceleration
Exhaust feels clogged with to much gas, when releasing the acceleration the car immediately slows down instead of coasting.
 

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Hello I've recently purchased a 2012 sxt challenger with 119k miles. On the drive home I spun out and a branch punctured my radiator hose under the car. I didn't realize the damage until a week later after having my mufflers deleted. My car overheated on the same day as the muffler delete. Took car back to shop they lifted the car and noticed the extreme leak. Since then I've had the radiator, water pump, thermostat, temperature sensor, radiator hose, cap, oil housing, tensioner pulley, belts replaced and the system bleed numerous times and I still hear bubbling sound in the dash as if air is still getting in the system. I took car to dealership payed 160 for diagnostic only for them tell me drive it around and if it still overheats then it may be a warp head! I am TIRED of pouring my money into jobs thts not fixing the problem please HELP!

Symptoms:
car takes about 10-15 min for temp gauge to reach mid point so engine runs cold,
Horrible fuel consumption
Stalled acceleration
Exhaust feels clogged with to much gas, when releasing the acceleration the car immediately slows down instead of coasting.
You have a 10 yr/150,000 mile extended warranty on your heads.
 

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2018 Scat Pack SHAKER in Plum Crazy
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"My car overheated on the same day as the muffler delete "
How bad? Just a warning light, then you stopped, or did it run till it died?
If it was just very hot and you shut it off, Fill it and just keep driving and topping it off, keep an eye on the overflow/coolant tank every drive, keep it at the full line when cold. It will keep sucking/burping air on its own slowly.
 

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Hello I've recently purchased a 2012 sxt challenger with 119k miles. On the drive home I spun out and a branch punctured my radiator hose under the car. I didn't realize the damage until a week later after having my mufflers deleted. My car overheated on the same day as the muffler delete. Took car back to shop they lifted the car and noticed the extreme leak. Since then I've had the radiator, water pump, thermostat, temperature sensor, radiator hose, cap, oil housing, tensioner pulley, belts replaced and the system bleed numerous times and I still hear bubbling sound in the dash as if air is still getting in the system. I took car to dealership payed 160 for diagnostic only for them tell me drive it around and if it still overheats then it may be a warp head! I am TIRED of pouring my money into jobs thts not fixing the problem please HELP!

Symptoms:
car takes about 10-15 min for temp gauge to reach mid point so engine runs cold,
Horrible fuel consumption
Stalled acceleration
Exhaust feels clogged with to much gas, when releasing the acceleration the car immediately slows down instead of coasting.
If you drove the car with a severe leak the cooling system was not able to maintain pressure and this resulted in stream pockets forming in the hotter areas of the engine -- the heads around the exhaust valves/ports -- and these steam pockets result in localized extreme overheating which can cause head damage. Warping (or cracking) is very possible.

A cooling system pressure test may be called for. The problem is the leak may not be that severe or even present when the engine is cold. Thus a cold pressure test might turn up no signs of any leak.

A standard test for oil in the coolant is to after the engine has been off and is cold to remove the coolant tank cap and look at the surface of the coolant for any oil drops.

For coolant in the oil the oil can be drained hot and an oil sample taken mid-drain and sent for analysis. The analysis checks for antifreeze compounds in the oil. There should not be any.

There are other possible explanations.

That the engine takes a long time to get warm, horrible fuel consumption, stalled acceleration, etc., this suggests the engine might be running too cold.

First I'd check the coolant temperature sensor is connected and the wiring is ok.

Was the right T-stat installed?

Could be the T-stat is just bad.

The cooling system needs to fully filled. Not familiar with your particular car but generally "most" cars fill ok by gravity. But if not a vacuum lift can be used to ensure the cooling system is completely filled with no air pockets. It is important to consider the shop may not have used the right antifreeze and if you take the car to a shop that has a vacuum lift system it may be filled with another type of antifreeze that is incompatible with what is in the engine now.

Once one is sure the cooling system has no air pockets then the engine can be started and the T-stat's proper operation can be confirmed by monitoring the temperature of the coolant outlet from the block -- the inlet to the T-stat -- and the outlet side of the T-stat. At some point when the coolant temperature coming from the engine is hot enough the T-stat should open and the temperature difference between the inlet side of the T-stat and the outlet side will decrease as the T-stat opens up more and lets more hot coolant flow.

The temperature of the coolant leaving the engine can be measured by an infrared thermometer. This reading can be compared to the coolant temperature obtained by the use of an OBD2 tools that queries the engine controller for coolant temperature. The thermometer reading and what the engine controller reports should be in close agreement. If the OBD2 temperature value is lower this can be a sign the coolant temperature sensor is bad.

As the engine runs if the outlet side of the T-stat doesn't get that warm that's a sign the T-stat is not operating correctly.
 

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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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6,145 Posts
Hello I've recently purchased a 2012 sxt challenger with 119k miles. On the drive home I spun out and a branch punctured my radiator hose under the car. I didn't realize the damage until a week later after having my mufflers deleted. My car overheated on the same day as the muffler delete. Took car back to shop they lifted the car and noticed the extreme leak. Since then I've had the radiator, water pump, thermostat, temperature sensor, radiator hose, cap, oil housing, tensioner pulley, belts replaced and the system bleed numerous times and I still hear bubbling sound in the dash as if air is still getting in the system. I took car to dealership payed 160 for diagnostic only for them tell me drive it around and if it still overheats then it may be a warp head! I am TIRED of pouring my money into jobs thts not fixing the problem please HELP!

Symptoms:
car takes about 10-15 min for temp gauge to reach mid point so engine runs cold,
Horrible fuel consumption
Stalled acceleration
Exhaust feels clogged with to much gas, when releasing the acceleration the car immediately slows down instead of coasting.
Who did all those part replacements you listed?

Where did they source the parts used to replace the OEM parts replaced on the car?

Is the Check Engine light currently illuminated?

Has the Check Engine Light ever come on during all this?

If so, what were the underlying DTCs?

Are there any DTCs currently stored in the PCM (active or inactive)?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If you drove the car with a severe leak the cooling system was not able to maintain pressure and this resulted in stream pockets forming in the hotter areas of the engine -- the heads around the exhaust valves/ports -- and these steam pockets result in localized extreme overheating which can cause head damage. Warping (or cracking) is very possible.

A cooling system pressure test may be called for. The problem is the leak may not be that severe or even present when the engine is cold. Thus a cold pressure test might turn up no signs of any leak.

A standard test for oil in the coolant is to after the engine has been off and is cold to remove the coolant tank cap and look at the surface of the coolant for any oil drops.

For coolant in the oil the oil can be drained hot and an oil sample taken mid-drain and sent for analysis. The analysis checks for antifreeze compounds in the oil. There should not be any.

There are other possible explanations.

That the engine takes a long time to get warm, horrible fuel consumption, stalled acceleration, etc., this suggests the engine might be running too cold.

First I'd check the coolant temperature sensor is connected and the wiring is ok.

Was the right T-stat installed?

Could be the T-stat is just bad.

The cooling system needs to fully filled. Not familiar with your particular car but generally "most" cars fill ok by gravity. But if not a vacuum lift can be used to ensure the cooling system is completely filled with no air pockets. It is important to consider the shop may not have used the right antifreeze and if you take the car to a shop that has a vacuum lift system it may be filled with another type of antifreeze that is incompatible with what is in the engine now.

Once one is sure the cooling system has no air pockets then the engine can be started and the T-stat's proper operation can be confirmed by monitoring the temperature of the coolant outlet from the block -- the inlet to the T-stat -- and the outlet side of the T-stat. At some point when the coolant temperature coming from the engine is hot enough the T-stat should open and the temperature difference between the inlet side of the T-stat and the outlet side will decrease as the T-stat opens up more and lets more hot coolant flow.

The temperature of the coolant leaving the engine can be measured by an infrared thermometer. This reading can be compared to the coolant temperature obtained by the use of an OBD2 tools that queries the engine controller for coolant temperature. The thermometer reading and what the engine controller reports should be in close agreement. If the OBD2 temperature value is lower this can be a sign the coolant temperature sensor is bad.

As the engine runs if the outlet side of the T-stat doesn't get that warm that's a sign the T-stat is
Who did all those part replacements you listed?

Where did they source the parts used to replace the OEM parts replaced on the car?

Is the Check Engine light currently illuminated?

Has the Check Engine Light ever come on during all this?

If so, what were the underlying DTCs?

Are there any DTCs currently stored in the PCM (active or inactive)?
I've been to total 4 different auto shops. Started with CAR X they replaced my radiator hoses after noticing the leak in the hose. $200 still overheated took it back they said coolant cap $14.50, problem consists I take to another mechanic shop which recommended a gasket tht was leaking coolant by water pump. Which was $200. Still overheated took it back to them and they found it leaking out the bottom of the radiator. Took the car to COMPARE AUTO which recommended radiator, water pump, tstat, $1100. Still overheated so they put a coolant temp sensor $90 still has the same problem with check in light coming on. It had about 3 sensor codes I believe camshaft sensor. I believe torque management code... and engine overheating code. The last time I took it I believe they put some stop leak in it because the coolant reservoir has black slime and coolant dirty. The car doesn't leak coolant until it overheats but is still getting air in the system overtime. After getting my car from the shop it Usually takes about a 100 miles of driving before the system gets filled with air pockets large enough to overheat again. So air is sipping in the system somewhere...
 

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Premium Member
The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
Joined
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6,145 Posts
I've been to total 4 different auto shops. Started with CAR X they replaced my radiator hoses after noticing the leak in the hose. $200 still overheated took it back they said coolant cap $14.50, problem consists I take to another mechanic shop which recommended a gasket tht was leaking coolant by water pump. Which was $200. Still overheated took it back to them and they found it leaking out the bottom of the radiator. Took the car to COMPARE AUTO which recommended radiator, water pump, tstat, $1100. Still overheated so they put a coolant temp sensor $90 still has the same problem with check in light coming on. It had about 3 sensor codes I believe camshaft sensor. I believe torque management code... and engine overheating code.
I don’t have any personal experience with these places you list, but based on the info you provided, they are all guilty of poor customer service and sloppy/incomplete automotive work IMHO...and a couple sound as though they might have outright shafted you, but that’s neither here nor there now, so I’ll drop it.

The last time I took it I believe they put some stop leak in it because the coolant reservoir has black slime and coolant dirty. The car doesn't leak coolant until it overheats but is still getting air in the system overtime. After getting my car from the shop it Usually takes about a 100 miles of driving before the system gets filled with air pockets large enough to overheat again. So air is sipping in the system somewhere...
Lots to unpack here:
1) no professional shop should have used the stop-leak on your car, especially on a hail-Mary like it sounds like. That stuff can cause issues in the cooling system elsewhere, like the heater core, etc. Nevertheless, it’s there now and should be kept in mind for all diagnosis steps going forward. NOTE: if you can identify the brand/kind they used, that would be very useful in determining its potential for later issues. If you have the receipt from that service, check it for a part number or brand name.

2) the black slime was very possibly the result of mixing incompatible engine coolants during one of the prior services where they had to top off/fill the coolant. Either way, if it’s in that reservoir, it’s everywhere else too. This is bad, very bad.

3) Not to be pedantic, but the air is getting into the system because the system is not properly sealed and allowed to build pressure as it requires. Is it leaking coolant? Maybe, maybe not. But there is a leak somewhere preventing the sealing up of the system, and that will cause problems 100% of the time.

Your underlying problem that causes the overheating could be one thing or a combination of several. If you want to fix it, you need to start at the bottom and identify the immediate cause for the overheat, then begin ruling out any/all things that can contribute to that.

Warning: The odds are that it won’t be easy or cheap to fix this overheat problem. You’ve already spent a lot of time and money with little to show for it. That’s unfortunate, but it’s in the past. More time, labor, and money is going to be needed for a resolution.

If this were my car, I’d start with identifying the root cause for the overheat. Low/no coolant circulation, loss of coolant, part failure, etc. Any or all could be the issue for the overheat. Find that out and then it can be addressed by further actions, more parts, selling the vehicle, etc.
 
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