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The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
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Discussion Starter #22
Nope, I see it now, buried down there on the driver's side. Looks like a lot of fun.
Oh yes, it's a blast.

Matter of fact, if I were to rank it using my "as fun as..." scale, I would have to say it is at least as fun as spending a night in county jail, but not quite as fun as roofing a house while hung over.
 

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How many miles were on your plugs at time of removal? Were the new plug performance noticeably better?
I hate my work connection as it wont let me look at the larger pic's!
 

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The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
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Discussion Starter #24 (Edited)
How many miles were on your plugs at time of removal? Were the new plug performance noticeably better?
I hate my work connection as it wont let me look at the larger pic's!
I had 70K on mine when I did them, which is a little early, but I had already taken the intake off so figured I better do them then.
I didn't notice a difference, but that's not unusual I don't think, as they were 100K mile plugs and still had life in them.
IMHO, you wont notice a difference unless the plugs in there are really bad off, and that wont happen until 150K miles or more at least.
 

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The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
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Discussion Starter #25 (Edited)
The combination of coil-over-plug and platinum 100K plugs in these motors creates a situation where the ignition system is able to perform at peak level for an extended amount of miles, and also compensate for any degradation in performance that might occur slowly over time.


So ultimately what you have is a scenario where you only need to change plugs according to maint schedule, and when you do, you are only guaranteeing that the performance is maintained going forward, but not improved per se because there really is no room for improvement
 

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THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU for this write up. That said, here's my deal...

I searched all over the web for a write up like this, but I don't have a Dodge... I have a Jeep Grand Cherokee with the same engine. Turns out, it sucks just as bad, if not worse!!!

I had a few things go wrong.... First, I followed some advice from a few sources that said instead of losening the lower upper intake manifold bracket nuts, to use a E5 socket and remove the stub from the manifold. This worked... until I got to the one by the throttle body. This one stripped almost instantly, and then it wouldn't come out. So, I don't have a new stud there. Is it necessary?

Oh, and the post at the bottom of the resonator on the Jeep broke.

I also ended up snapping the vacuum harness. It is kind of brittle.

It took me well over 4 hours just to get the manifold off. I have all of the tools mentioned here and then some.. but on the Jeep, I ended up laying on top of the radiator most of the time because I'm 5'7" short and couldn't reach hardly any of the things I needed to. Putting it back wasn't much fun either. I would LOVE to see a video of someone doing this "the correct way".

So, plugs replaced easily enough...

Can someone find me the part number for the studs that have the threads and T-5 end on them? I can't seem to locate it in the parts guide... Or are these going to be part of the whole manifold?

So anyways, I joined this forum just to post this reply.
 

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Just changed my spark plugs Saturday.
Biggest problem is the nut and stud on the lower drivers side bracket.
The back one that holds the radiator tube.
After that it is a piece of cake.
Took me 1 hour 30 minutes to complete.
Thanks for the write up.
 

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I also recently ran across a little tool which I purchased specifically for the Pentastar spark plug change, and I wanted to document it for anyone not aware of its existence.

There are two hose clamps you will need to disengage in the Challenger engine compartment which are difficult to get loose if you do not have the proper tool (both are on the PCV line onright side of engine/intake). Here is one such tool:

View attachment 240929

View attachment 240937

Notice the claws that can be moved back and forth, that's how it grabs the hose clamps it is so that the target hose clamp can be grabbed and held while pressure is applied/added to compress the clamp and get it move down the tube it's clamping

The jaws are driven by a worm screw that runs along the top of the tool, and that action is driven by with a 1/4 ratchet (no socket; just the ratchet.

There are only two of these clamps on the Pentastar that you need to worry about while doing the plug change, but I could not get anything else to work except this, so keep that in mind.
What's the name of this tool, I have never seen one like that.

I realize my car is new, but hell, I prefer to do my own maintenance and I like to plan well enough in advance for it.
 

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The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
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Discussion Starter #29
What's the name of this tool, I have never seen one like that.

I realize my car is new, but hell, I prefer to do my own maintenance and I like to plan well enough in advance for it.
I don't remember the specific name other than just a hose clamp tool, but I still have that one I used for my 2011 even though I don't have the 2011 anymore. If you can't find one locally, ill sell you mine, just DM me.
 

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The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
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Discussion Starter #30
What's the name of this tool, I have never seen one like that.

I realize my car is new, but hell, I prefer to do my own maintenance and I like to plan well enough in advance for it.
Evidently it is called a Hose Clamp Vise:
Amazon.com: Lisle 44500 Small Hose Clamp Vise: Automotive


I got mine at a local Pep Boys, and I searched their webpage up and down but couldn't find it, so cast the net a little wider, and I finally found it on Amazon. That price may look expensive for such a little tool, but I paid about $30 for it at Pep Boys, so the $20-something on Amazon is about right I guess.

Anyway, check your PCV line to make sure you have those funky type of clamps that would require this little tool (it possible the Pentastars mfg'd lately don't use them anymore), and if it does, one of those is the best way to get them on/off.

Although, if you do not plan on installing a catch can, you might be able to get away with not buying one and just hacking it with some pliers or something. I spent a considerable amount of time and effort installing, removing, resinstalling, etc. different styles of catch cans on my Pentastar, so having that tool made working with those clamps much less troublesome.
 

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The Autolite XP5701 spark plugs are the wrong reach as are several others listed on various web sites for this engine. It is about 1/16th inch shorter. (better than long and crashing into a piston I suppose). NGK #93911 and #93175 are the same as the Autolite above. NGK #9723 is the correct reach. Not sure however how the heat range compares to the OEM Champion. It would be good to see more information regarding all this. At this point I need to get this engine back together and would rather not do this again, and if detonation happens hopefully it will be dialed back through the knock sensors.
 

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The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
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Discussion Starter #32
The Autolite XP5701 spark plugs are the wrong reach as are several others listed on various web sites for this engine. It is about 1/16th inch shorter. (better than long and crashing into a piston I suppose). NGK #93911 and #93175 are the same as the Autolite above. NGK #9723 is the correct reach. Not sure however how the heat range compares to the OEM Champion. It would be good to see more information regarding all this. At this point I need to get this engine back together and would rather not do this again, and if detonation happens hopefully it will be dialed back through the knock sensors.
The knock sensors will pick up any detonation (real and imagined) and tell the PCM so it can pull spark timing, that’s not an issue. I found they were too sensitive in fact, reporting knock when there wasn’t any. Better safe than sorry though I guess...

As far as how the different plugs compare on heat range and other aspects, if I were to try to compile that info for comparison, I’d probably start with RockAuto’s website to pull each plugs specs, and then I’d hit each mfgr’s website to get a heat range table for comparing and contrasting their respective heat range ratings versus what I was looking to get in the replacement plug.

That’s what I had to do for the most recent spark plug experiment I performed on my 5.7L where I purchased 16 plugs of several different brands to compare in the engne. It took a while to compile the info, but I was able to get it done eventually (so that all plugs were the same heat range).
 

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Thanks for the quick reply and part of my intention with this is to just compare the engine performance with the new plugs. Power and fuel economy have always been outstanding so the OEM baseline is good. If the new plugs duplicate that, all is good.
 

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The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
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Discussion Starter #34
I would be very surprised if a change in plug type or brand could have a significant MPG affect on those 3.6L engines. They are already running at peak efficiency just about, I just don’t think there’s much room for improvement.

I tried to see if I could find an increase in MPGs or performance in my 5.7L by doing that, and I saw no real difference between the various types (Copper, Platinum, Iridium, etc) or brands (Champion, Autolite, NGK).

Where I did end up seeing the biggest change in MPGs in this 5.7L, and I seem to remember the same holding true for the 3.6L, was in how spirited my driving was or wasn’t.

Setting the cruise control around town and on long trips will return 3-4 MPG better mileage than having lots of WOT on the same trip(s).

Changing out spark plugs never affected the MPGs that much, that I saw anyway.
 

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I certainly don't expect any improvement in engine performance with spark plug replacement. I will just compare to the OEM baseline that there is not a reduction in engine performance.

Yes, driving conditions make a huge difference to fuel economy. Driving easy at 65 to 70 mph over the mountains and back from the Front Range in Colorado nets 31.5 mpg. Maintaining 75 to 80 mph heading north on I-25 through Wyoming with a 30 to 50 mph crosswind drops the fuel mileage below 21 mpg. One key to the best mileage is keeping it in high gear. So not using the cruise control and letting the speed drop a little on inclines is sometimes the best way to accomplish that.

This 3.6 Pentastar is fantastically efficient with 78.6 to 84.7 bhp/litre depending on the application. While the 5.7 in chargers and Challengers is 65.2 bhp/litre. The 392 gets 75.8 bhp/litre still not equaling the weakest 3.6. If they made 3.6 Challengers with the Tremec 6 speed I could be very interested in that. In the meantime if the right deal comes along for Scat Pack or T/A 392 I could be tempted.
 

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The Pork Wagon (‘14 Cop Charger)
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Discussion Starter #36
I certainly don't expect any improvement in engine performance with spark plug replacement. I will just compare to the OEM baseline that there is not a reduction in engine performance.

Yes, driving conditions make a huge difference to fuel economy. Driving easy at 65 to 70 mph over the mountains and back from the Front Range in Colorado nets 31.5 mpg. Maintaining 75 to 80 mph heading north on I-25 through Wyoming with a 30 to 50 mph crosswind drops the fuel mileage below 21 mpg. One key to the best mileage is keeping it in high gear. So not using the cruise control and letting the speed drop a little on inclines is sometimes the best way to accomplish that.

This 3.6 Pentastar is fantastically efficient with 78.6 to 84.7 bhp/litre depending on the application. While the 5.7 in chargers and Challengers is 65.2 bhp/litre. The 392 gets 75.8 bhp/litre still not equaling the weakest 3.6. If they made 3.6 Challengers with the Tremec 6 speed I could be very interested in that. In the meantime if the right deal comes along for Scat Pack or T/A 392 I could be tempted.
Yep, the 3.6L + A5 transmission combo was/is a good one, especially for MPGs, but it lacks any real low RPM acceleration. The 3.6L + A8 transmission combo available in the 2015+ year models fixes that problem for the most part. Good MPGs on the highway and good acceleration from a dead stop (as good as possible given the relatively meager amount of torque the engine puts out) is what the ZF 8 speed auto transmission brought to the 2015+ cars. Now any Hemi in the same car will obviously have significantly more acceleration than the 3.6L, no matter what transmission. But when just talking about the 3.6L, the best option all the way around for transmissions is the newer 8 speed autos in the 2015 and up year models.
 

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Part 2: Spark Plug Choices/Specs

First, you are going to want to make sure you can procure yourself a set (6) of replacement spark plugs before you start tearing things apart. You can get them from your local Dodge dealership’s Parts Department (Champion), or you can get them from one of your local auto parts stores (Autolite/NGK). You will probably find that availability dictates your source/brand here.



Here’s the part numbers (and pertinent info for each brand) of spark plug currently available:

3.6L Pentastar spark plugs


  • Champion RER8ZWYCB4 (OEM)
    • Part # 9407 (MOPAR part # SP149125AD)
    • .043” gap (per Service Manual)
    • Torque to 13 lb/ft
  • Autolite XP Iridium
    • Part # XP5701
    • .044” gap (per Autolite)
    • Torque to 13 lb/ft
  • NGK Laser Iridium
    • Part # 9723
    • .043”/.044” gap (per Nuke)
    • Torque to 13 lb/ft
You may notice the difference in listed gaps of the various spark plugs above. That is due to a) what I’ve read, b) what I’ve seen, and c) what I think.


a) The Service Manual says the OE plugs should be gapped at .043”, and I am assuming that is a spec from Champion for their plug, so I have repeated it here.


b) The Autolite XP plugs listed .044” as their gap spec, and that’s what they were out of the box (most of them anyway), but I double-checked each spark plug before installing it.


c) I have no info on the NGKs either way, but I’m guessing you’ll be fine if you gap them at either .043” or .044” before installation. Just make sure they are all the same, whichever gap you settle upon.
( ngk.com ) shows part# NGK 9723 SILZKR7B11 Laser Iridium Plug works for 3.6l pentastar with gap set at .044, works great in my 2012 Challenger as the part # 1989 works with my daughters Kia Soul 1.6 with gap set at .032
 
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