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Did you know that Street & Racing Technology (SRT) began as "Team Viper" to develop the Dodge Viper? It later merged with "Team Prowler," the developers of the Plymouth Prowler, to become Specialty Vehicle Engineering (SVE). This was renamed Performance Vehicle Operations (PVO) in January of 2002. Since all PVO vehicles used the SRT name, the PVO development group was renamed SRT in 2004.

In 2012 Chrysler implemented a plan to turn SRT into a separate brand under the Chrysler Group umbrella. During the 2013 and 2014 model years, the Dodge Viper was sold under the model name SRT Viper. In May 2014, the SRT brand was re-consolidated under Dodge, with former SRT CEO Ralph Gilles continuing as senior vice president of product design and also as the CEO and president of Motorsports.

Here is the SRT Vision:

"SRT creates some of the Chrysler Group's boldest, most distinctive products by single-mindedly following its core vision: Deliver benchmark performance at an affordable price and deliver it with absolute integrity and credibility.

Every SRT vehicle showcases five key aspects:

1. Exterior styling that resonates with the brand image.
2. Race-inspired interiors.
3. World-class ride and handling.
4. Benchmark braking.
5. Standout powertrain."
 

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:thup: :thup:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
They could work on that " Affordable" Price thing.
You have a point. Cars are definitely more expensive. Consider these surprising facts:

2018 Median Income (in U.S.)= $59,055
Cost of 2018 Challenger SRT= $49,495
Percentage of Annual Income= 84%

1971 Median Income= $10,430
Cost of 1971 Hemi Challenger= $4,500
Percentage of Annual Income= 43%

That being said, "affordable" is a relative term. Dodge cars, like the Hellcat, are providing performance comparable to foreign cars costing three or four times more.

https://www.challengertalk.com/forums/f51/motor-trend-best-driver-s-car-662327/
 

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But shag carpet wasn't cheap!

A Guy
 

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Too bad they've managed to blur the line on SRT lately.
Actually, the "line" has been clarified.

Let the SRT team build performance options, put that technology into Dodges, and sell the heck out of them.

The "Brand" concept that SRT was pushing for wasn't working. It didn't generate sales numbers that were expected.

FCA got smart, canned the "Brand" concept, started offering SRT engineered performance options, and sales took off.

The Scat Pack sales proved that FCA made the right move.

Dodge is the brand, SRT is the performance option.
 

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I agree. Good for Scat guys, bad for SRT fans is all. Helped the heck out of sales though. Bring on an SRT426 and all would be good again :) (and "forged" 392 for you guys)
 

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This might upset some SRT owners, but I'm going to say it: The line is blurred because there isn't much of a difference. The SRT engineers are still behind the development of the R/T and Scat Pack models, particularly in the chassis. It's been that way for years. Nobody was upset that you could get Super track pack suspension (Bilsteins, sway bars, lower springs, etc) in a 2009 R/T 5.7L. Guess where those components came from? Now look at the 2019 R/T Scat Pack widebody. It's not called an SRT, but the SRT team made it happen, with further suspension upgrades, shock tuning, brakes, etc. They just think it will sell more if they call it an R/T.

Why is that? I think it's because in what was considered the Golden age of the muscle car, there was no SRT. From 1968-71, Scat Pack was the name that they put on the high performance Dodges. 426 Hemi, 440-6 Pack, etc. They were R/Ts and they were the top dogs. In a way, they were the SRTs of their time. Fast forward to today, things like R/T, Scat Pack, Shaker, heritage, etc. resonate with old school fans who remember that era, or are familiar with it. That's what Dodge has noticed, so they are playing the marketing game accordingly.

I'm a MOPAR nut, and I want Dodge's sales to do well. It benefits us because it gives Dodge a reason to keep investing in improvements in their lineup. The way I see it, SRT isn't a 392 engine, a hood, or even much of a brand. SRT is a team of people who make those improvements happen. Then things trickle down and improve the breed.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It's all about profits Back in 2008, everyone thought that the Challenger would have a limited 3-4 year run and be a collectible. However, the Challenger has been in production an incredible 12 years (2008-2019). This is because Dodge has done an exceptional job of keeping the Challenger fresh, through many model, performance and appearance options, as well as slick marketing, while keeping the same basic body style.
 

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I think Corvette does it right. Do you want a Stingray, Grand Sport, ZO6 or ZR1? No lines blurred there. Forget having a ZO6 engine if you want a Grand Sport etc.
 

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I think Corvette does it right. Do you want a Stingray, Grand Sport, ZO6 or ZR1? No lines blurred there. Forget having a ZO6 engine if you want a Grand Sport etc.
That is a nice simple way to have a lineup. Though some believe the Z06 went too much like the previous ZR1, when it got supercharged in 2015.
 

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...while keeping the same basic body style.
Dodge didn't reach for the koolaid. They could have jumped on the update/modernize bandwagon as every other manufacturer has. They could have changed the look of the Challenger to try to boost sales, but they kept the same classic look that started it all way back in 1970. The Challenger remains the only car you can buy that looks like it nemesis from nearly 50 years ago. And as long as this strategy sells a reasonable number of new cars, we can enjoy buying brand new Challengers that look just like the ones we trade in.

Consider this: a while back, I read about one shop that will marry, for example, your 2018 Corvette with a 1967 body. It costs a small fortune. For those wanting retro looks with modern day performance, there's a way if ya got the bucks. But here we are in 2018... able to walk into any Dodge showroom and for a reasonable price: simply buy one. Life is good.
 

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Dodge didn't reach for the koolaid. They could have jumped on the update/modernize bandwagon as every other manufacturer has. They could have changed the look of the Challenger to try to boost sales, but they kept the same classic look that started it all way back in 1970. The Challenger remains the only car you can buy that looks like it nemesis from nearly 50 years ago. And as long as this strategy sells a reasonable number of new cars, we can enjoy buying brand new Challengers that look just like the ones we trade in.

Consider this: a while back, I read about one shop that will marry, for example, your 2018 Corvette with a 1967 body. It costs a small fortune. For those wanting retro looks with modern day performance, there's a way if ya got the bucks. But here we are in 2018... able to walk into any Dodge showroom and for a reasonable price: simply buy one. Life is good.
Retro sells, but so do bragging rights. While keeping the styling proper, It's also important that they keep pushing what they can do with the performance. They've been doing a great job of it, with widebodies, 392s, Hellcat, Demons, Redeyes, and so on. That's the work of the SRT team. Just leaving it completely the same under the hood and chassis wouldn't keep it selling year after year the way it does.
 

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Retro sells, but so do bragging rights.
Brilliant words, 41. Creative advertising doesn't hurt either. Years ago, manufacturers were scared to death of Washington, and in the middle seventies, nobody would have dared to air a commercial showing a car burning its tires up and down city streets. We've come a long way baby.

As I've said before, 95 percent of the people who would see and maybe appreciate the Challenger have no idea that an RT is any different from an SRT. I'll bet 25 percent don't know it's a Dodge and a good number would guess that it was a Charger. Within our little forum all this matters, but in the real world, a whole lotta people really don't know the difference and probably wouldn't care anyway.

Unrelated, but to prove a point: Years ago, many of my students thought the Hayubasa was the fastest thing on two wheels. None of them knew that Kawasaki had permanently dethroned the old boy back in 2012 with the advent of the mighty ZX14.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
As I've said before, 95 percent of the people who would see and maybe appreciate the Challenger have no idea that an R/T is any different from an SRT. I'll bet 25 percent don't know it's a Dodge and a good number would guess that it was a Charger. Within our little forum all this matters, but in the real world, a whole lotta people really don't know the difference and probably wouldn't care anyway.
You're 100% correct.
 

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As somewhat of a sidebar, I came of age during the late 60's, early 70' muscle car era. Lost my car interest in the late 70's and 80's. I would never have dreamed where we'd be at some 40 years later. It's great to be a born again car guy lol.
 

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Cuda- thanks for the history of the SRT division, that is interesting. In the Midwest I didn't see many Mopar cars at all from the 60s and early 70s, the unibodies all rusted out.


I'm interested to know what is the relationship between Dodge/SRT and Arrow Racing? When I was researching a tuned Stage 1 PCM for the RT, I saw an article that made it look like Arrow built the motor for the Viper. Chime in.
 

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Cuda- thanks for the history of the SRT division, that is interesting. I'm interested to know what is the relationship between Dodge/SRT and Arrow Racing? When I was researching a tuned Stage 1 PCM for the RT, I saw an article that made it look like Arrow built the motor for the Viper. Chime in.

The Viper was initially conceived in late 1988 at Chrysler's Advanced Design Studios. Lamborghini (then owned by Chrysler) helped with the design of the V10 engine and casted a prototype aluminum block, based on Chrysler’s LA V8 engine (see link, below). A major contributor to the Viper since the beginning was Dick Winkles, the chief power engineer, who had spent time in Italy. The first retail shipments of the Viper began in January 1992.

Arrow Racing Engines,founded more than 30 years ago to support Chrysler Motorsports, Performance Parts and Production, was also involved with the Viper’s V10 engine development, as well as supporting design, research and testing. It later built all of the engines for Dodge’s Viper racing program. This resulted in victories in the 24 Hours of LeMans (the GT2 class), the Rolex Daytona 24, the 24 Hours of Nurburgring, and more.

Arrow Racing Engines was later acquired by Prefix which developed a custom 5th generation Viper convertible.

Here are the engine details:

https://www.powerperformancenews.com/tech/arrow-racing-engines-secrets-for-racing-viper-motors/
 

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Thanks for the Arrow history and info. Not to knock the Arrow products, but the tuned Stage 1 PCM in my 5.7L hemi Charger is a dud. I would advise anyone looking to do the Stage 1 package to forget the PCM as a waste, throw in the Mopar cone filter air intake and a performance exhaust, and call it good.
 
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