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Ralph Gilles, President/CEO of Dodge was asked, "What will the SRT8 look like in the future?" Here is his answer:

"There will still be a handful of V-8s out there, but we're going to invest in fours and sixes. With the SRT, we've had turbo fours in the past. We're looking at active dampening, which we actually have today in the SRT8 Charger. So it's taking all of these technologies that people associate with relatively exotic cars and bring it down to the Dodge customer, making it much more affordable...I see the future as being all about duality, having your cake and eating it, too...a 400-hp engine that gets 40 mpg."

Source: August 2011 Motor Trend


It looks like our Hemis are on "borrowed time." :(
 

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No worries with the right turbo setup a six cylinder can put up big numbers. This just means I need to hold on to my V-8 car.
 

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This is what I thought. At the Bankruptcy filing they showed the engine choices through 2014 and for cars there was only a 5.7 and I believe a dual turbo V6 was talked about. You can thank CAFE standards for killing the big V8s. They have to hit those numbers and it won't be long where those numbers will be in excess of 50 MPG.

The SRT-8 performance group will exist but in a different way than today. The reality is that the US Government wants to force us to high mileage cars plain and simple.
 

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I say bring it on. Forced induction vehicles can put out serious power and get better gas mileage. Especially turbo charged vehicles. Can you replace the burble and sound of a V-8 engine? No. But the performance can be had. To this day the most fun vehicle I have ever owned and driven was an SRT4 Neon. That little turbo charged 4cyl was an absolute blast and was capable of embarrassing a lot of performance vehicles out at that time.

Like THEONE said above, hold on to your V-8 SRT...could be a nice item to have here in 10 years or so. Although I still don't know that you will see the V-8 disappear from the Challenger. The SRT vehicles sell in such lower production numbers they could most likely keep a V-8 in the Challenger if they wanted. Although I'm not sure exactly how they calculate the fleet mpg average for a manufacturer.

I hope they make an SRT6 at some point by twin turbo charging the new Pentastar V-6 and price it in the mid 30's. I suspect we wouldn't see this until they replace the current Avenger with one based off a Fiat platform here in a year or two.
 

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O you can for sure make amazing numbers with turbocharging 4s and 6s but you can never replace the V8 sound. I came from a 1995 Mitsubishi Eclipse GSX. a 210 horse awd 5 speed turbo car. It was an amazing vehicle. I loved every minute of driving that car. When the turbo came in it put you in the seat every time. I came to the v6 challenger first. It just didnt have the power or the sound i was looking for or thought should be in a muscle car. So i found my current RT in cincy ohio for 27,500 with only 6 thousand miles on it. It was like it was made for me. No fancy interior no fancy radio. Just a 6 speed and a v8. I love the V8s throaty sound and mated to the Tremec is wonderful. I knew the V8s would go away so ill just hold on to the one i got and keep the miles low. The Neons are very nice. There a pretty amazing power car but i mean come one no matter how you look at it its still just a neon! lol
 

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American car always should have V8 in it.. 6 cylinder are bmw's brand..
+1 for that. If I wanted a turbo 4 or 6 there are plenty to be had now.
 

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The Neons are very nice. There a pretty amazing power car but i mean come one no matter how you look at it its still just a neon! lol
The SRT4 Neon more than any other car SRT has made epitomizes what SRT is all about. It was affordable, had performance no other car in its class could touch, was a blast to drive and was absolutely loved by those who owned them (they still have a big following even today). I couldn't help but to smile when I drove that car. I always loved it when people just called it a Neon. Usually that comment was made by people with slower cars :bigthumb: I will own one again someday. If I enjoy my Challenger as much as I did my SRT4 I will be extremely happy but they are really two different cars.

I agree about the sound though. I mentioned that in my original post. You can't replace the rumble from a nice V-8 exhaust and IMO Dodge has done a good job of creating sweet HEMI music.
 

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Something to keep in mind is - what technology will be in practice in those future years?

Thinking back on the primitive (and neither fuel efficient or power-wise efficient) controls and technology we had in the 70s-80s with the old vacuum - mechanical systems.

I look through the old service manuals for the 70s era...imagine no timing advance until the tranny was in top (3rd-auto / 4th-stick) gear.
No mileage and a lack of power. The hotter combustion temps made for lower CO and HC values, but the NOx went up - then you needed EGR systems to bring that down.

It was hard to imagine that we went from 140-150hp V8s in the late 70s to what we have today - with much more power and MPG than we imagined.

Imagine trying to ask a engineer from back then about what the future might have had in the 21st century based on what was known at the time...
 

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Something to keep in mind is - what technology will be in practice in those future years?

Thinking back on the primitive (and neither fuel efficient or power-wise efficient) controls and technology we had in the 70s-80s with the old vacuum - mechanical systems.

I look through the old service manuals for the 70s era...imagine no timing advance until the tranny was in top (3rd-auto / 4th-stick) gear.
No mileage and a lack of power. The hotter combustion temps made for lower CO and HC values, but the NOx went up - then you needed EGR systems to bring that down.

It was hard to imagine that we went from 140-150hp V8s in the late 70s to what we have today - with much more power and MPG than we imagined.

Imagine trying to ask a engineer from back then about what the future might have had in the 21st century based on what was known at the time...
I have a slightly different take on this, maybe due to my age. I am much more impressed with how well a properly setup vehicle from 1969 worked (still does) with only electromechanical systems and not one single computer. You can throw enough computing power at just about any system and overcome marginal basic design. When using "crude" electromechanical controls only, your basic design had better be good and inherently stable.
Your point about 70s-80s vehicles is well taken, artificial constraints (pollution mandates) made them neither efficient nor powerful.
 

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I have a slightly different take on this, maybe due to my age. I am much more impressed with how well a properly setup vehicle from 1969 worked (still does) with only electromechanical systems and not one single computer. You can throw enough computing power at just about any system and overcome marginal basic design. When using "crude" electromechanical controls only, your basic design had better be good and inherently stable.
Your point about 70s-80s vehicles is well taken, artificial constraints (pollution mandates) made them neither efficient nor powerful.
I agree with your point that older engines are easier to set up.

However, the manufacturers took an odd approach to piggy-back systems onto older designs (some better executed than others).
Many reduce comp. ratios (heads, piston changes), but the basic 50s-60s engines continued with all the added-on smog gear (air pumps, EGR, timing retard/delay, leaner jetting, restrictive pellet-style cats) those approaches turned out cars with really poor drivability characteristics.

But to get the (pre-emissions) old iron [compared to OEM tune, carbs, timing] to run properly on today's (ethanol-laced) gas, it requires some re-jetting, re-setting the the static timing and new timing advance curves to get their peak power back up to where it was.
The older cars also tend to run hotter with the present gasolines and often require larger radiators, or as many now do, put in aftermarket aluminum replacements to cope with the cooling issues.

The old gasoline forumulations (pre-MTBE, oxygenates) were much more forgiving on the older engines state of tune and the general condition of the engine, not so much today.

If an old car is not in top tune, it will just not behave all that well (generally speaking, of course).

I remember in 1980 when the first generation of electronic / feedback systems were coming out - it was a significant step over the old vacuum-mechanical systems. I read up on these systems and learned how they worked - this "stuff" was here to stay and it would pay off for me to learn how to work with it, rather than fight against it.
OBD-II systems were another big step in furthering the technology, and from '96 onward with improved fuel metering and engine controls, power and MPG began to improve over the previous designs.

I lived in CA for a long time and remember when the biennial smog inspections began in '84 - in later years the pre '75 exemption rule came along as well as the 30+ model year exemption. Before '84, you had to submit for smog inspection to change title/sell a vehicle.

Some states don't exempt the older cars in the same fashion, so for example a '68 model year may have had air injection systems - you may be required that whatever was in effect for that model year, it has to be present and functioning.


Then along came injection and more powerful control modules, along with engine designs with things integrated together, rather than adapting new parts onto a 40-50 year old design that was a less costly approach. Many of today's engines run clean enough to forgo the EGR systems, along with the additional maintenance they would require for one example.

For the power, cleaner emissions and fuel mileage we get, this was not possible in years past - there was only so much possible with the old technology and today's cars demonstrate many of those points.
 

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New CAFE Standard

With the recent Obama administration decree, the CAFE standard has been increased to 54.5 MPG by 2025 (Google this for many articles). This presidential decree was lost in all the budget discussions. This year, the standard is 30.2 MPG, and is sufficient to cause many oil companies to begin rethinking production of gasoline in the country. Conoco-Phillips will split into two companies, upstream and downstream, to separate the refinery business from the exploration business. Thus the refinery business can be sold off if needed.ffice:eek:ffice" /><O:p></O:p>
<O:p></O:p>
I work in the alternative fuels industry and agree that we need to conserve fuel. But this standard dictates what cars we can buy, and this was done without your representative bodies voting on this critical issue. In the true sense of the word, this is tyranny (A cruel or oppressive act, especially one committed by a person wielding great power.)<O:p></O:p>
<O:p> </O:p>
I suggest that everyone write your Representative and Senator about this issue and suggest that such power be taken away from the President. Presidential Decrees have great impact on the country and there is nothing that can be done to stop them short of replacing the standing president.<O:p></O:p>
<O:p> </O:p>
What the new CAFÉ standard means is that we will be driving diesel powered Smart cars at best. Even many motorcycles cannot meet this standard. What we need to do is develop our own domestic resources including coal and shale oil as well as natural gas. We have plenty of energy for the future if we use it wisely. This does not mean dictating what we can purchase. In a free society, that should be done by marketplace forces. Not government forces. But we no longer are in a free society unless we choose elected officials that support freedom of choice.<O:p></O:p>
 

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Ralph Gilles, President/CEO of Dodge was asked, "What will the SRT8 look like in the future?" Here is his answer:

"There will still be a handful of V-8s out there, but we're going to invest in fours and sixes. With the SRT, we've had turbo fours in the past. We're looking at active dampening, which we actually have today in the SRT8 Charger. So it's taking all of these technologies that people associate with relatively exotic cars and bring it down to the Dodge customer, making it much more affordable...I see the future as being all about duality, having your cake and eating it, too...a 400-hp engine that gets 40 mpg."

Source: August 2011 Motor Trend


It looks like our Hemis are on "borrowed time." :(
IF this is true, and they only sell V4 and V6 engines in the future, I'll be able to sell my V8 Challenger for a mint:):):)
 

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With the recent Obama administration decree, the CAFE standard has been increased to 54.5 MPG by 2025 (Google this for many articles). This presidential decree was lost in all the budget discussions. This year, the standard is 30.2 MPG, and is sufficient to cause many oil companies to begin rethinking production of gasoline in the country. Conoco-Phillips will split into two companies, upstream and downstream, to separate the refinery business from the exploration business. Thus the refinery business can be sold off if needed.ffice:eek:ffice" /><o>:p></o>:p>
<o>:p></o>:p>
I work in the alternative fuels industry and agree that we need to conserve fuel. But this standard dictates what cars we can buy, and this was done without your representative bodies voting on this critical issue. In the true sense of the word, this is tyranny (A cruel or oppressive act, especially one committed by a person wielding great power.)<o>:p></o>:p>
<o>:p> </o>:p>
I suggest that everyone write your Representative and Senator about this issue and suggest that such power be taken away from the President. Presidential Decrees have great impact on the country and there is nothing that can be done to stop them short of replacing the standing president.<o>:p></o>:p>
<o>:p> </o>:p>
What the new CAFÉ standard means is that we will be driving diesel powered Smart cars at best. Even many motorcycles cannot meet this standard. What we need to do is develop our own domestic resources including coal and shale oil as well as natural gas. We have plenty of energy for the future if we use it wisely. This does not mean dictating what we can purchase. In a free society, that should be done by marketplace forces. Not government forces. But we no longer are in a free society unless we choose elected officials that support freedom of choice.<o>:p></o>:p>
+1 on that
The General public will not get what is happening until it is too late. I am trying to imagine an SRT that gets 54 miles to the gallon. Sheesh!
 

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...keep in mind that the future CAFE standards have been changed numerous times from what was originally planned.

In the 80s/90s the standard would have been about 37 for the present day, but the auto industry lobbied and got that CAFE standards brought down.

The CAFE # was not realistic to achieve with the technology available [at the time] and the costs both to the manufacturer and the end consumer buying the vehicles would have had adverse effects on both mfgr and buyers.
 

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I read the article in the new issue of Motor Trend, bought it for something to read on vacation on the beach.

If you read the whole article it puts it into more of a perspective. The article was basically about how cars are getting better and better performance but are getting more and more efficient. So they asked alot of performance car makers where they think the performance cars will be in 10 years. Alot said electric / hybrid or smaller turbo engines as the technology matures and enables performance cars to still be fast but also be more efficient.

It was an interesting article to read what other companies thought "performance cars" will be in 10 years. I can't remember any super whacky ones but the thought of a hybrid supercar kinda made me laugh until I turned the page and read about 2 of them... haha
 

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Here's another angle - who would have imagined that we had the kind of performance from engines < 400 cubes and in cars that are 4,000# +?

Not to mention the braking and handling performance that even "exotics" had back in the day...

Especially from the perspective of what we had in the late 60s to early 70s.
 
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