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Well, after they sat on my shelf for nearly 2 years, I finally pulled the trigger. I had the catback off to replace the carrier bearing in the drive-shaft, so I figured "what the hell" I guess.

Wow, was this job understated by others. I'm an experienced gearhead with pretty much every tool you could imagine in a home garage, but this was a bear. I elected to do it on jack stands, rather than throw it up on the lift, and in retrospect that was the best possible decision I could have made.

Pull the motor mounts. If you are doing this on an RT car, PULL. THE. MOUNTS.

I had to modify the double headed studs that mount the motor mount to the mount bracket, where the heat shields connect to the motor mounts. I cut the outer studs off completely, opting to connect the heat shields to the mounts "permanently" via the inner stud surface. After doing all of this, you would be okay only removing the rear stud on the passenger side and cutting both driver's side studs down to 1/4" of thread. The amount of work that it took to get the studs positioned beneath the passenger side header was insane.

If you are doing this for an RT car, you'll need 8mm, 10mm, 13mm, 15mm, 16mm, and 18mm sockets of various sizes. I used wobble extensions, knuckles, and free flexing ratchets. If you use gearwrench style (detented) flex ratchets, you will piss yourself off. I used an $18 harbor freight 1/4" drive flex ratchet with a short handle more than anything for the initial removal, and then a combination of pass-through sockets and the flex ratchet for re-install.

Total time working alone on the garage floor was ~12 hours. Easily 4 hours of that was spent fighting for access to stubborn bolts. The top 2 bolts on both sides of the headers were a piece of cake, it was the motor mounts that sucked up all of my time. Without those hiccups, I would have had wheels up and back down in 8 hours working alone.

If you are planning to do this yourself, it may be in your best interest to disconnect the motor mounts on BOTH SIDES where they connect to the subframe, prior to lifting the engine. I did one side at a time, which worked extremely well for the driver's side and moderately well for the passenger. To access the top 2 bolts on the driver's side, move the coolant overflow tank towards the rear of the engine bay (The A/C hoses adjacent to it will hold the coolant lines fairly well, allowing EASY access to the top 2 bolts). For the passenger side, removing the serpentine belt and rotating the alternator forward saved an incredible amount of effort. With the passenger side ~4" above the neutral position, you can access everything fairly well.
 

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Yep I know a few guys that have done this and I think they would agree with you on the amount of work this job is. I've done headers on a few cars over the years and it seems like it always ends up being a bigger job than expected. Congrats on getting it done and for posting the info on the install. (y)
 
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