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What is the most desirable way to go about this on our new generation Challengers? Crank the motor without firing it? If so, how to do this? (you can't pull the coil wire like on our old stuff)

I guess the idea is to get oil circulating before actually firing the motor. Suggestions?
 

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I wouldn't be thinking to hard about it. Been storing modern day cars in upstate NY for the past ten years. Start it up and off you go. Seriously though, start it let it run a few minuets, do an inspection around engine. Off you go.
 

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Push the accelerator to the floor, and then push the start button. Engine will crank but not start. This will get oil circulated throughout the engine.


After that, just start it like normal.
 

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What nards444 said.

Some favor using the starter motor to crank the engine but in some way preventing the engine from running.

The problem with this technique is the starter motor doesn't turn the engine over very fast at all, maybe 75RPMs or so. The engine doesn't have to be spun very fast at all to start. Generally the engine starts when one or two cylinders go through a full intake stroke, compression stroke and deliver a good power stroke which spins the engine a bit faster and the other cylinders follow suit in probably within the next full couple or 3 revs.

As you I'm sure recall when started the engine RPMs zoom right up then fall back some.

The reason for this is to get the engine running with a minimum of cranking to help reduce wear and tear on the battery and starter but to also get the engine running on its own power ASAP and running fast enough to ensure a fast and adequate supply of oil to all the critical areas of the engine.

By using the starter motor to crank the engine the oil pump may not prime -- especially if sitting a long time between uses -- or if it does it just won't circulate that much oil -- gear oil pumps are not very efficient at low speeds -- and what oil it may circulate will have very low pressure. Plus the slow cranking may not be sufficiently energetic enough to cause the residual oil to form the hydrodynamic bearing (a wedge of oil) that keeps metal to metal contact from happening. To add insult to injury this slow cranking forces the residual oil out of the bearing areas and when the engine does start and RPMs zoom upwards there may be insufficient oil to protect the bearings until the oil pump is able to deliver oil.

You help ensure a good start up after a long period of lack of use by changing the oil shortly before you put the car away. 'course, after you change the oil you run the engine enough to ensure the fresh oil gets circulated through out the engine.

The fresh oil is the best oil at remaining in critical oiling areas. It is also the best oil at providing suitable lubrication upon engine start with just the residual oil present.

I'm a bit more cautious than nards444 is though.

So before you start the engine after the end of say seasonal storage just give the car a walk around. Open the hood and check the engine compartment for any signs of rodent infestation. Confirm all vital fluid levels are ok.

Then with the hood open just start the start the engine as you normally would. Stay ready to shut off the engine if there is any signs of trouble like a noise or something. This doesn't have to be from inside the engine, it could be from a marginal accessory drive component that just decided to fail. You just want to be ready to turn off the engine if there is any untoward noise or behavior from the from being started and run after a long period of not being started and run.

If all is well, then let the engine idle and keep your eyes on the dash for any warning lights. While I don't expect there will be any you should do this regardless if you haven't started the engine in months or just minutes.

Continue to let the engine idle and warm up some and confirm it sounds ok, it appears to be running ok, and there are no signs of any issues.

'course, you have already adjusted tire pressures so after some few minutes of idling then you can take a walk around the car looking underneath for any signs of fluid leaks.

If during your (so to speak) pre flight inspection you find no reason to not to then you are ready to take the car out and give it a shake down drive to make sure all systems are working properly. Be sure to use the brakes hard enough to remove any rust that might have developed during lack of use. Avoid using the brakes to bring the car to a stop until after you have used the brakes a couple of times to slow the car to remove the rust.

As soon as you can add fresh gasoline to the tank and resume your normal routine with the car.

Until next late fall.
 

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The oil pump on the modern Hemi's is driven directly off the crank, unlike the older engines that were driven off the distributor and cam gear.

It takes a few cranks to get oil pressure indication (sender is at oil filter pad).

You can set your EVIC display to oil pressure and see when oil pressure appears.

The oiling system for these Gen III engines - the lifters get oil last in the system. It comes up from the heads, into the rocker shaft, through rocker arm, down the push rod to the lifter.

Priming it can probably get the oil started so that the valve train and lifters get oil in moments after start up from sitting for a long time (such as winter storage).

Just don't crank more than 15 seconds at a time - let the starter cool down as the windings will heat up with extended cranking.

I've done this procedure after cam swaps - get little lifter clatter doing it this way.
 

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The important part was to do as Dodge recommended and ran the compressor on full blast for at least 5 minutes before parking it. Your most likely failure is not the engine after sitting, it's the HVAC system.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The important part was to do as Dodge recommended and ran the compressor on full blast for at least 5 minutes before parking it. Your most likely failure is not the engine after sitting, it's the HVAC system.
Never heard of that one before. So are you saying to run the A/C on full cold before shutting down for the winter?
 
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