Dodge Challenger Forum banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of October's Ride of the Month Challenge!
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking at upgrading my exhaust on my SE from a single to a dual. I would like to look at getting a stock SRT or RT exhaust. I am also under the impression that some of the new V6's came with stock duals.

Any recommendations? Does anybody have an SRT or RT or even a stock dual off a V6 that they'd be willing to sell?
Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
I am looking at upgrading my exhaust on my SE from a single to a dual. I would like to look at getting a stock SRT or RT exhaust. I am also under the impression that some of the new V6's came with stock duals.

Any recommendations? Does anybody have an SRT or RT or even a stock dual off a V6 that they'd be willing to sell?
Thanks!
i have one but it night be tough to ship. mine is from a six speed
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,488 Posts
The stock SRT8 and R/T exhaust will be larger than the V6 and could result is a loss of power, not sure if the stock V8 exhaust will bolt up, either.

If memory serves...

R/T is 2.5"
SRT8 is 2.75"
SE/SXT is 2.25"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
No it wont bolt on directly I will have to make an adapter pipe. However I don't understand how larger piping will reduce horsepower.... Is it because there will be less back pressure?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,488 Posts
No it wont bolt on directly I will have to make an adapter pipe. However I don't understand how larger piping will reduce horsepower.... Is it because there will be less back pressure?
I think "back pressure" is the most misunderstood/misused term when it comes to exhaust. :D Exhaust size has to do with power output (As it relates to the volume of exhaust) and exhaust gas scavenging. Simply put, an exhaust that's too small will have an exhaust gas velocity that's too high and the pipe will also be a restriction.

An exhaust that's too large will have an exhaust gas velocity that's too low and it won't pull the gasses out of the cylinder, which means the engine has to push them out, wasting power.

A properly sized exhaust will allow proper scavenging with minimal or no restriction. This scavenging is basically the ability of exhaust gas pulses to "draft" the pulse in front of them, getting pulled along by it. This effect pulls the exhaust gas out of the cylinder so the engine doesn't have to do the work, which translates into the engine being more efficient and producing more power to the wheels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
I am not trying to agree or disagree. Just sharing my recent experience. I thought I would try it and worse case put my old system back on. But I feel no difference at low rpm and the sound is perfect. Still pulles hard at wot but I have no proof for performace gain other then what I hear and feel.

Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

·
Registered
http://www.dragtimes
Joined
·
1,899 Posts
I am not trying to agree or disagree. Just sharing my recent experience. I thought I would try it and worse case put my old system back on. But I feel no difference at low rpm and the sound is perfect. Still pulles hard at wot but I have no proof for performace gain other then what I hear and feel.

Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
I've always heard that anything past the cats won't cause too little of backpressure. If you were catless then yes, 2.75" is way too big but as long as you are running stock cats, you probably won't notice any power loss.
A lot of the R/T people are running straight pipes from the cats back and they didn't seem to notice any power loss as well. I have no data to support this, just repeating what was posted on other threads.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,488 Posts
A lot of the R/T people are running straight pipes from the cats back and they didn't seem to notice any power loss as well. I have no data to support this, just repeating what was posted on other threads.
Straight pipes or pipes with straight-through mufflers won't make any difference, it's not about back pressure or too little of it. If the exhaust size is appropriate for the power output then that's what matters, along with removing restrictions (the resonators are restrictions because they cause exhaust flow to change direction in an extreme way).

The myth of "back pressure" started because people, usually ricers, would go and throw a huge exhaust on their little Honda and they would suffer a considerable loss of power. People started blaming it on the free-flowing nature of the new exhaust and they didn't understand that it was the huge pipe they used, not the free-flowing nature of the exhaust, that caused their loss.

I've posted this link before, so here it is again. This explains the general conversion of HP to CFM and what size pipe to use for a given HP range. Chrysler follows this formula as well.

How To Calculate Muffler Size and Exhaust Pipe Diameter | Exhaust Videos
 
  • Like
Reactions: teddyp
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top