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Hi everyone,

I got a 2012 challenger srt8, and this week was doing some front and rear suspension check up and upgrade like spohn rear control arms, speedlogix endlinks, front ball joints, and others.

i found a whiteline bushing kit # w63339 laying in my garage for long time now. It’s for the rear spring link inner position which is located in the rear subframe. anyway I decided to replace this bushings using my ball joint and bushings press tool. I tried a lot removing them without taking off the subframe coz it’s not a good idea for me, i am not at this level yet. I can tell u it is a headache, i wish I didn’t think about and settled with the parts I already installed, with a hole day on it i only managed to remove the sleeve with some of the rubber around it, couldn’t remove the bushing metal housing even I couldn’t move it 1mm. I thought it’s a piece of the subframe. I did not try heating it i am not sure about that with the car on jack stands and i am under it. I asked one mechanic and one working in shop using hydraulic press machine they told me to take the sub frame out for changing them. I don’t wanna do that only if it’s a must.

Please i need ur help replacing them without taking out the subframe with everything connected to it.

Thanks

I will try to upload some good pics.


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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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Post up a pic of the bushing and surrounding area you are referencing. I am having trouble visualizing what you are talking about.
 
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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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No, it wasn’t your English, I just wasn’t sure which part you meant when you said the bushing in the spring link. I was honestly unaware that piece could be replaced.

It does appear as though it can be from looking at your pics, but it doesn’t look easy at all, that’s for sure.

I wish I had more to offer, but I’ve never tried this, so it will be a learning experience for both of us I guess 🤓
 

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Those are the rear cradle bushings. Yes, that is an extremely difficult removal. Use, cold chisels, drills, saws, anything you can. Then get some help with the other three. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It’s only 2 bushings the inner spring link connects to them, I thought of these tools, i have a small die grinder i might use, just don’t wanna miss with the sub frame itself. Thanks for passing by.


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Furious Fuchsia 2010 Challenger R/T Classic A5
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Mopar has a 15-piece bushing tool kit specifically for the rear cradle and suspension - Miller 9031. It's several hundred dollars though even when you find used sets on eBay.

The design seems to be the same as the 4 subframe bushings so searching that topic that may be of some help. I know some people have resorted to burning out the rubber or using a reciprocating saw on those dang cradle bushings. At least it avoids dropping the entire rear subframe in order to get to a proper press.

To avoid damaging the structure and without the proper tools, I'd probably use a hawksaw to tediously but safely work my way through the outer sleeve. 2 cuts 1/4" apart and the same 180 degrees opposite, chisel out the pair of 1/4" channels, and hopefully the rest pops out with just a little more persuasion.

At least you didn't mess with the outer spring link bushing! Even the Chilton/Haynes manuals say to leave that one alone and for the professionals. Best of luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Mopar has a 15-piece bushing tool kit specifically for the rear cradle and suspension - Miller 9031. It's several hundred dollars though even when you find used sets on eBay.

The design seems to be the same as the 4 subframe bushings so searching that topic that may be of some help. I know some people have resorted to burning out the rubber or using a reciprocating saw on those dang cradle bushings. At least it avoids dropping the entire rear subframe in order to get to a proper press.

To avoid damaging the structure and without the proper tools, I'd probably use a hawksaw to tediously but safely work my way through the outer sleeve. 2 cuts 1/4" apart and the same 180 degrees opposite, chisel out the pair of 1/4" channels, and hopefully the rest pops out with just a little more persuasion.

At least you didn't mess with the outer spring link bushing! Even the Chilton/Haynes manuals say to leave that one alone and for the professionals. Best of luck.
Thanka a lot,
i did remove the rear subframe i had some help also. Next time i will be more careful with these bushings.


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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
After I wrapped up everything i have a new issue now, the car is not balance the passenger side is higher than the driver side, I don’t know the cause.
Parts Installed
  • rear bmr trailing arms
  • Spohn rear adjustable control arms
  • eibach sway bars
  • h&r lowering springs
  • Front bmr bump steer kit
  • front detroit axle lower adjustable ball joints
  • adjustable whiteline bushings for upper control arm.

The problem could be anywhere I don’t know, i guess i have to check everything all over again.
Any help plz
Thanks


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About the only thing changing the height are the springs. I would start there.
 

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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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Can you Measure the ride heights at each wheel and post those?

The difference between the left and right and front and back should be indicative of where to start looking for the problem.

But yes, the coil springs are normally the main component that dictates ride height, so if the ride height is not as expected, they will probably be involved somehow.

Ive seen the shocks affect ride height in rare and special cases, but I would not expect that to be a factor here unless you were running the self-leveling Nivomats in the rear, or if you replaced some high quality units like the Bilsteins with some lower quality dampers like those from Monroe’s economic line.
 
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