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Nuke, you need some help. Changing the oil on a rental?
Although I am not far off I guess since I am currently fighting the desire to wash and wax the rental charger sitting in my driveway.
W

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I admit that changing the oil on my rental car at my own expense is not within the set of behaviors considered to be "the norm", but honestly don't see that I had any choice in the matter. My hand was forced by their inaction the last 12 months.

I'm telling you, that oil was the factory fill, and if it wasn't the worst example of motor oil I've ever drained from a running vehicle, it was definitely neck in neck with whichever one from my past was in the worst shape!

Asking any oil, even a Nissan-branded synthetic one, to go 12 months and 29K miles without losing all effectiveness is asking a lot IMHO. Asking it to do all that in a rental car is just insanity though, no two ways about it. The way I figured, I will be turning that car back in with 3K more miles on it than when I got it. And for me to do that, all the while knowing the engine oil was cashed, would just be beyond the pale.

What am I, a barbarian?!?!

Now the whole wax-job thing is a little different. That inclination is born more out of sympathy and a sense of pride than anything else. I feel sorry for the car that it's exterior has been so mistreated since rolling off the factory floor and into the grubby hands of the rental company. And I also do not want to be seen driving a dirty junker around for the next 2-3 weeks. So I am thinking the best way to kill both those birds with one stone would be to wash it real good and hit it with one of my Clearance Aisle waxes.

I've got a whole shelf in the garage full of OTC waxes and sealants that I found for dirt-cheap on one of the local auto-parts stores' clearance aisles after it had been discontinued or phased out. There's nothing wrong with them, for the most part, but for whatever reason, if they are on that shelf, they did not impress me enough to replace one of my favorites I have in regular rotation. And this situation is a perfect one for those puppies - I get to use one of them and thus get a return on the investment of buying them, plus I get to show this poor car a little kindness for once in its miserable, mistreated life.

Sounds like a win-win to me...Everybody wins, and I get to exercise my philanthropic muscles a little by donating some interior lubrication and exterior protection to a car-in-need. 0:)
 

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Well this thread has sufficiently inspired me to de-swirl my car once again. This time, however, I'll be waiting for cooler weather. I'll make sure my pads/compounds are correct, and take my time.

Something that will help me personally was the tip to focus on one area at a time, rather than being overwhelmed by the whole car. Really take my time and inspect before moving on, and spread over multiple days. I'm about to change all the fluids (motor oil, trans, diff, coolant) with BND's products, and want the outside to feel like the inside!
 
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Well this thread has sufficiently inspired me to de-swirl my car once again. This time, however, I'll be waiting for cooler weather. I'll make sure my pads/compounds are correct, and take my time.

Something that will help me personally was the tip to focus on one area at a time, rather than being overwhelmed by the whole car. Really take my time and inspect before moving on, and spread over multiple days. I'm about to change all the fluids (motor oil, trans, diff, coolant) with BND's products, and want the outside to feel like the inside!
Yeah, I don't know what kind of strange weather event combination occurred recently to give us our current pattern this week, and I know we'll be right back to blast-furnace temps by next week, but MAN O' MAN, 80-degree outside temps have never felt so wonderful!!

I just hope it's not a case of, "if it's not as bad now, that means it is going to be twice as bad later!", because I would truly have to box myself up and ship myself somewhere north of here...don't care where, just somewhere COOLER.
 

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Yeah, I don't know what kind of strange weather event combination occurred recently to give us our current pattern this week, and I know we'll be right back to blast-furnace temps by next week, but MAN O' MAN, 80-degree outside temps have never felt so wonderful!!

I just hope it's not a case of, "if it's not as bad now, that means it is going to be twice as bad later!", because I would truly have to box myself up and ship myself somewhere north of here...don't care where, just somewhere COOLER.
Well my dad was expecting rain, drove out to 'the island' to work (still working outside at 72) and by the end of his 30 minute drive that rain turned into a direct hit by a tropical storm! i think that helped cool tx, to fl, to nc. I'm sure we will see 100 degrees again in a few weeks. I'll wait until October..
 

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"... because I would truly have to box myself up and ship myself somewhere north of here...don't care where, just somewhere COOLER.
Hmmm... like Seattle maybe? Daughter just left the sweltering heat of Orlando to move to her new apartment in Tacoma, WA. She said it has been in the 90's and a forecast for 100 was imminent this week. Absolute record temps for them. However, I hear that northern Alaska is nice this time of year :smile:
 

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Hmmm... like Seattle maybe? Daughter just left the sweltering heat of Orlando to move to her new apartment in Tacoma, WA. She said it has been in the 90's and a forecast for 100 was imminent this week. Absolute record temps for them. However, I hear that northern Alaska is nice this time of year :smile:
Alaska is not a bad idea. I wonder who would be able to ship a 300 pound, oddly shaped, Nuke-smelling box to Alaska the cheapest out of UPS, FedEx and USPS??
 

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Well this thread has sufficiently inspired me to de-swirl my car once again. This time, however, I'll be waiting for cooler weather. I'll make sure my pads/compounds are correct, and take my time.

Something that will help me personally was the tip to focus on one area at a time, rather than being overwhelmed by the whole car. Really take my time and inspect before moving on, and spread over multiple days. I'm about to change all the fluids (motor oil, trans, diff, coolant) with BND's products, and want the outside to feel like the inside!
There is another problem with DA polishing that I forgot to mention earlier, and it needs to be mentioned here at the very least - dry buffing (I think that's the name for it, forgive me if it's not).

Anyone using a DA polisher is susceptible to this, but those which are still learning to use a DA, and more importantly those still trying to perfect their own technique with that polisher, are especially susceptible to dry buffing. It is bad because once it occurs, the polishing pad's ability to actually polish out the swirls in the CC is drastically reduced, if not outright stopped. (Once you become well versed in using the DA polisher, this isn't as big of a concern because your normal habits and technique will mostly prevent this from happening, not to mention you'll have learned to watch for it and correct immediately when seen.)

In a nutshell, dry buffing means that your polishing pad is no longer being lubricated by the product's lubricants, which prevents it from removing swirls for the most part, and actually makes it more likely to leave some CC marring behind.

The easiest way to watch for and identify when you have gone from regular polishing to dry buffing condition is to keep an eye on the paint surface immediately behind your polishing pad's trailing edge. You should be able to see a very slight film of (the compound/polish) lubricant left behind on the paint everywhere your polisher has just polished. If there is no film (just dry paint) being left behind as you slowly work the polisher up/down & left/right, then the product's lubrication has been used up, locked up, or otherwise become unavailable to lubricate the paint being polished by the pad.

Should you notice this has happened to your polishing pad while you are working a body panel or test spot, all you need to do is stop polishing, clean the pad (or replace it with a fresh one), and reapply some more product so you can resume the polishing at the same spot.

This one is easy to forget, and I find myself sometimes forgetting to watch for it. But if you can remember to watch for it and fix it when it occurs, that will save you much time and effort that would otherwise be wasted polishing it over again later.

Nuke

P.S. Before you start your de-swirl, see if you can take some before pics that capture the swirls in focus. Then take the same pic after you are done, and post them up for us see your de-swirl in all its glory
 

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There is another problem with DA polishing that I forgot to mention earlier, and it needs to be mentioned here at the very least - dry buffing (I think that's the name for it, forgive me if it's not).

Anyone using a DA polisher is susceptible to this, but those which are still learning to use a DA, and more importantly those still trying to perfect their own technique with that polisher, are especially susceptible to dry buffing. It is bad because once it occurs, the polishing pad's ability to actually polish out the swirls in the CC is drastically reduced, if not outright stopped. (Once you become well versed in using the DA polisher, this isn't as big of a concern because your normal habits and technique will mostly prevent this from happening, not to mention you'll have learned to watch for it and correct immediately when seen.)

In a nutshell, dry buffing means that your polishing pad is no longer being lubricated by the product's lubricants, which prevents it from removing swirls for the most part, and actually makes it more likely to leave some CC marring behind.

The easiest way to watch for and identify when you have gone from regular polishing to dry buffing condition is to keep an eye on the paint surface immediately behind your polishing pad's trailing edge. You should be able to see a very slight film of (the compound/polish) lubricant left behind on the paint everywhere your polisher has just polished. If there is no film (just dry paint) being left behind as you slowly work the polisher up/down & left/right, then the product's lubrication has been used up, locked up, or otherwise become unavailable to lubricate the paint being polished by the pad.

Should you notice this has happened to your polishing pad while you are working a body panel or test spot, all you need to do is stop polishing, clean the pad (or replace it with a fresh one), and reapply some more product so you can resume the polishing at the same spot.

This one is easy to forget, and I find myself sometimes forgetting to watch for it. But if you can remember to watch for it and fix it when it occurs, that will save you much time and effort that would otherwise be wasted polishing it over again later.

Nuke

P.S. Before you start your de-swirl, see if you can take some before pics that capture the swirls in focus. Then take the same pic after you are done, and post them up for us see your de-swirl in all its glory
Thanks again for the tip, I'll watch out for that. And yeah, I'll take some before and after pics. Right now there is some overspray from when I put sealant our privacy fence so between those tiny dots and the swirls everywhere I should get some good pics.

I currently have a broken hand from working on something else on the house, so once that heals (and the temps cool) I'll clay, polish, and seal her for winter.
 

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There is another problem with DA polishing that I forgot to mention earlier, and it needs to be mentioned here at the very least - dry buffing (I think that's the name for it, forgive me if it's not).

Anyone using a DA polisher is susceptible to this, but those which are still learning to use a DA, and more importantly those still trying to perfect their own technique with that polisher, are especially susceptible to dry buffing. It is bad because once it occurs, the polishing pad's ability to actually polish out the swirls in the CC is drastically reduced, if not outright stopped. (Once you become well versed in using the DA polisher, this isn't as big of a concern because your normal habits and technique will mostly prevent this from happening, not to mention you'll have learned to watch for it and correct immediately when seen.)

In a nutshell, dry buffing means that your polishing pad is no longer being lubricated by the product's lubricants, which prevents it from removing swirls for the most part, and actually makes it more likely to leave some CC marring behind.

The easiest way to watch for and identify when you have gone from regular polishing to dry buffing condition is to keep an eye on the paint surface immediately behind your polishing pad's trailing edge. You should be able to see a very slight film of (the compound/polish) lubricant left behind on the paint everywhere your polisher has just polished. If there is no film (just dry paint) being left behind as you slowly work the polisher up/down & left/right, then the product's lubrication has been used up, locked up, or otherwise become unavailable to lubricate the paint being polished by the pad.

Should you notice this has happened to your polishing pad while you are working a body panel or test spot, all you need to do is stop polishing, clean the pad (or replace it with a fresh one), and reapply some more product so you can resume the polishing at the same spot.

This one is easy to forget, and I find myself sometimes forgetting to watch for it. But if you can remember to watch for it and fix it when it occurs, that will save you much time and effort that would otherwise be wasted polishing it over again later.

Nuke

P.S. Before you start your de-swirl, see if you can take some before pics that capture the swirls in focus. Then take the same pic after you are done, and post them up for us see your de-swirl in all its glory
Why does the pad need to be replaced?

Just curious!
 

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Why does the pad need to be replaced?

Just curious!
When I said it may need to be replaced, I meant it may need to be replaced on the polisher with a fresh one, not discarded permanently or anything.

For example, you might start out polishing the car's hood, and eventually work your way to the top of the car, with several stops in between (one stop on each side of the hood maybe). And each time you stop to move, you would clean the pad of used product and apply fresh polish to it. But eventually it will become saturated with product and polished paint dust to the point where it cannot be cleaned well enough to continue. So at that point, you would take off the polisher and toss it in a bucket of water and laundry detergent so it can soak for a while.

And in the meantime, you replace it on the polisher with another (clean) pad which you then prime with polish/compound and continue on polishing the paint.
 

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When I said it may need to be replaced, I meant it may need to be replaced on the polisher with a fresh one, not discarded permanently or anything.

For example, you might start out polishing the car's hood, and eventually work your way to the top of the car, with several stops in between (one stop on each side of the hood maybe). And each time you stop to move, you would clean the pad of used product and apply fresh polish to it. But eventually it will become saturated with product and polished paint dust to the point where it cannot be cleaned well enough to continue. So at that point, you would take off the polisher and toss it in a bucket of water and laundry detergent so it can soak for a while.

And in the meantime, you replace it on the polisher with another (clean) pad which you then prime with polish/compound and continue on polishing the paint.
Or to put it another way, you would not want to use the same polishing pad for the whole car. You would want to have a couple of fresh ones ready to go so that when one became too fouled to effectively continue, it is replaced with a fresh one, and so on and so forth.
 

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Alright, I can't shake the feeling I've managed to make things less clear with my last few posts, as opposed to clearing things up, which was my intention.

So in the interest of making amends for that transgression, and also as a way to keep myself occupied while I wait for the return of my Challenger (10 days left!), I have decided to throw a quick polishing down on my rental car's hood. I will record some snippets of video in the process in which I will try to better explain a couple of the points I tried to make above.

My hope is that the concepts I muddled with my posts above will now become more clear after having been observed in action.

So, stay tuned for my next post which should have some youtube links which, when watched, should make this stuff easier to digest.

You'll have to forgive me in advance for the car I will be demonstrating this stuff on, but I only own one Challenger and it's not currently in my possession. So we're going to have to use my rental car instead. It's a 2017 Nissan Altima, which normally wouldn't be that good of a candidate probably since it's so new, but with it being a rental car, it apparently has had absolutely zero attention paid to the care and maintenance of its exterior paint. It's got more swirls and spiderwebs than you can shake a stick at...but just the right amount of them to shake a DA polisher at!!

Nuke
 

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Just to be sure you know, the OP is still here, just taking in all the knowledge and experience you guys have before I jump in. I must say I feel a lot more confident and am actually kind of looking forward to my first attempt.
 

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Swirl Removing Tips & Tricks: Illustrated in Pics

So it turns out taking decent video footage of yourself polishing a car's hood is difficult to do without a dedicated camera person to hold the recorder steady and aim it at what it needs to be aimed at. As such, I didn't have any helpers, and thus I do not have any video footage that would be worth posting. Add that to the fact that I do not have my full sized polisher right now and had to use my little 3” DA polisher drill attachment, and this whole deal almost went in the tank before it started.

Nevertheless, I do have some pics, so hopefully those will suffice for now.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

This first one illustrates a tip I don't believe I ever mentioned but which occurred to me when I saw it, and so I am mentioning it now – mark the backing plate of your DA polisher so you can tell when it is rotating (and thus polishing) versus no longer rotating (and thus doing nothing):

Backing Plate Mark.jpg

The idea behind this is that since the DA polisher design is to allow a certain amount of downward force up to the point where it might become too much, and at that point, the polishing mechanism stops rotating and starts jiggling. Now you are going to get your best results when you apply more force, but if you apply too much and it stops polishing, you're wasting your time.

Q: How to tell where that line is?

A: By putting a mark like the one above on your backing plate and watching it while polishing.

If it is rotating, you're still good. If it is just slowly vibrating, you've applied too much downward force and need to back off a smidge.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

This next pic illustrates what you should be looking for while moving the polishing pad across the paint to identify whether you are wet buffing or dry buffing:

Wet Buff vs Dry Buff.jpg

The film of polish (or lack of) your polishing pad leaves behind will tell you if you are still polishing the paint. If you are still wet buffing, as illustrated by the topmost part of the pic, your polish still has some lubricity on the pad and is still good to continue on with.

On the other hand, if you are in the dry buffing zone, as illustrated by the bottommost part of the pic, you are no longer polishing the paint with that pad and whatever polish you put on it. The lubricity of the polish has been used up or is otherwise no longer there, and so you are no longer polishing the paint at that point. You should stop and either clean the pad and apply more polish, or just replace the pad with a fresh one and prime it with polish before starting up again.

Ideally, you won't get into the Dry Buffing zone until you have just about finished your 5-6 section passes on that part of the paint anyway, if ever. But as the pad gets more gunked up, you may find that you start Dry Buffing earlier and earlier, to the point where you can only make a few section passes before it's Dry Buffing. That's a good sign you need to change pads and get a fresh one.

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This last pic is to illustrate something anyone just starting out should consider when first learning how to polish paint with a machine polisher, especially if you're using a car which you have not polished previously – the test spot:

Test Spot.jpg

The idea is to tape off a section of the paint which about 3-4 times the width of the polishing pad and confine your polishing to that area only. My pads here are only 3”, so that section is about 12”x12”. For a full-sized polisher pad, 5-6”, you would want to make your section about 20”x20” or 24”x24”, as the body panel allows of course.

Not only will this help you keep your section passes confined to the desired area, but it will help you compare the results to the condition of the rest of the paint once done, thereby aiding in your decision to stick with that particular pad/polish combo or move up/down in aggression for each.

So once you've done a test spot with your regular polish and a polishing pad, if you see that there are a lot of swirls left, you know you can step it up to a heavier cutting pad and heavier polish maybe to get the job done the first time. Once you're satisfied wit that, you can move onto the rest of the car, and you don't have to tape off any more sections, but it certainly won't hurt, especially your first few times around.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Other than that, the only thing I want to reiterate is to find yourself a good LED flashlight to use as a swirl finder and polish verifier for this kind of work. The light should have a single LED source and be as bright as you can find, because you're basically trying to mimic the sun. Use it any time you want to check your results or just hunt for errant swirls to polish out. By holding it above the paint at an arms length or a little less, and angling it so that your eye can see the swirls, you'll be able to tell right away whether or not you are doing any good with your polishing.
 
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Discussion Starter #56
I finally (8 months later) did it.



I bought a Porter-Cable DA polisher last year but just this weekend decided to go at it.



It was much easier thaan I anticipated and all the water spots and swirls are completely gone. I put a fresh application of Meguiars paste wax on the car afterwards. Thanks for all the help.
 

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Looking good! :thumbsup:

A Guy
 
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