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Discussion Starter #1
So I’m going to try to get my idea across the best I can. I’m newer to cars and just got my 2017 Challenger SXT. I want to replace the stock tail lights with something a little bit closer to the classic taillights. The newer ones have the white reverse lights going through the middle of the break lights and has a divot to it. What I want to do is have it solid red and flat. Kind of like the taillight bars just without the middle section. Is it possible? If so any ideas on how to accomplish this? I’m not 100% sure what all would fit. Could I get the tail light bars and just put in the outer edge parts. Not sure if they will fit and still have everything plug in. Or is there any cover I could put over the pre-existing headlights that won’t make it look cheap.
 

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your best bet, go to a bodyshop and get a quote.. I'm guessing you'll have $2000+ in trying to graft some OG challenger taillights into your car. Unless you own a taillight company creating something will be unbelievably difficult.
 
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like this? Probably not even possible. Heck I am waiting for a cheap solution to turn what is currently the brake light (thin red line in the outer half of our lights) into the tail lights and the bolder, brighter "race tracks" into the brake lights.
978575
 

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like this? Probably not even possible. Heck I am waiting for a cheap solution to turn what is currently the brake light (thin red line in the outer half of our lights) into the tail lights and the bolder, brighter "race tracks" into the brake lights.
View attachment 978575
Yes exactly like that! I’m sure there’s some DIY magic I can whip up somewhere somehow. I’m surprised no ones has tried to do something like this already.
 

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your best bet, go to a bodyshop and get a quote.. I'm guessing you'll have $2000+ in trying to graft some OG challenger taillights into your car. Unless you own a taillight company creating something will be unbelievably difficult.
Maybe I should start a company lol. I can’t be the only one who wants something closer to the original tail lights
 

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Maybe I should start a company lol. I can’t be the only one who wants something closer to the original tail lights
not to sound negative, but I get the impression if you were capable of doing such a task you wouldnt be here on the forum asking if anyone else has ever done this conversion. I'm thinking you dont fully understand the amount of fabrication that would be involved in doing this. But, educating ones self is what this country was made on, so start practicing your welding, start an apprenticeship at a body shop and learn how to do some clean body work, get some metal breaks and some machining equipment to be able to fabricate a kit and sell them.
 

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not to sound negative, but I get the impression if you were capable of doing such a task you wouldnt be here on the forum asking if anyone else has ever done this conversion. I'm thinking you dont fully understand the amount of fabrication that would be involved in doing this. But, educating ones self is what this country was made on, so start practicing your welding, start an apprenticeship at a body shop and learn how to do some clean body work, get some metal breaks and some machining equipment to be able to fabricate a kit and sell them.
Partially Kidding lol and there’s more than one way to start a company but that sounds like a discussion for a different thread. The easiest way I would think of doing it would be making a mold of the current size/shape of the taillight and then adding alterations to the mold to match closer to the OG taillights. Fill, sand, and color the taillights and replace the stock taillight plastic. The only problem with that is that’s more work than I was wanting to do. Was wondering if anyone had an easier process/idea to do this.
 

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Partially Kidding lol and there’s more than one way to start a company but that sounds like a discussion for a different thread. The easiest way I would think of doing it would be making a mold of the current size/shape of the taillight and then adding alterations to the mold to match closer to the OG taillights. Fill, sand, and color the taillights and replace the stock taillight plastic. The only problem with that is that’s more work than I was wanting to do. Was wondering if anyone had an easier process/idea to do this.
You pretty much hit the nail on the head... that’s what it would take to do a modification like this. There aren’t any real shortcuts and to my knowledge no one else has ever done this retrofit. Soo.... get on it, you can be the first and the trendsetter. That may be worthy of getting the attention of a magazine


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You pretty much hit the nail on the head... that’s what it would take to do a modification like this. There aren’t any real shortcuts and to my knowledge no one else has ever done this retrofit. Soo.... get on it, you can be the first and the trendsetter. That may be worthy of getting the attention of a magazine


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Idk about the attention of a magazine lol. It’s a lot of work and some equipment I’ll have to go get. I’ll post a picture when I get a chance to do all of this.
 

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Not sure if its quite the effect you are after, but I slipped some additional LED boards inside my tail lights to get amber turn signals and red rear fog lights to comply with UK lighting regulations.

Cut a slot in the side of the tail light to slide in the turn signals and glued them in with black PU sealant, also used to reseal the lamp. Hidden under the trim when re-installed. Same for the fog lights into the reversing lamps. Each board covers about half the original light, so keeping the OE brake light and reversing lamp partially visible.
 

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Not sure if its quite the effect you are after, but I slipped some additional LED boards inside my tail lights to get amber turn signals and red rear fog lights to comply with UK lighting regulations.

Cut a slot in the side of the tail light to slide in the turn signals and glued them in with black PU sealant, also used to reseal the lamp. Hidden under the trim when re-installed. Same for the fog lights into the reversing lamps. Each board covers about half the original light, so keeping the OE brake light and reversing lamp partially visible.

Do you have any pictures of your mod?
 

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Not sure if its quite the effect you are after, but I slipped some additional LED boards inside my tail lights to get amber turn signals and red rear fog lights to comply with UK lighting regulations.

Cut a slot in the side of the tail light to slide in the turn signals and glued them in with black PU sealant, also used to reseal the lamp. Hidden under the trim when re-installed. Same for the fog lights into the reversing lamps. Each board covers about half the original light, so keeping the OE brake light and reversing lamp partially visible.
I’m pretty sure he just wants to put a set of 1970’s taillights in a new car
 

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All he's going to accomplish is ruin a good set of classic tailights and waste a bunch of money.
i couldnt agree more.. I tried to point out that no one is doing such a mod for a reason and it would be like $2000 to do it.. he said he can do it himself and he wants to do it, not my say so in how people spend their money
 

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The easiest way I would think of doing it would be making a mold of the current size/shape of the taillight and then adding alterations to the mold to match closer to the OG taillights. Fill, sand, and color the taillights and replace the stock taillight plastic. The only problem with that is that’s more work than I was wanting to do. Was wondering if anyone had an easier process/idea to do this.
OR you could engineer an adapter that fits the lights to the current model Challenger in a CAD system and 3-D print your parts. Then if someone else wants that, print another one. You'd have to get a cloud of points scan of your challenger with all light assembly parts removed, and a scan of the 70's vehicle tail end. Merge the files, do some position adjustments and design your adapter.
 

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While you are at it, whip me up a 1971 'Cuda set, and a front grille that will work on a '15 and up R/T.
 

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While you are at it, whip me up a 1971 'Cuda set, and a front grille that will work on a '15 and up R/T.
Sure thing, just sign this purchase order authorizing me to get started!

Nobody has any illusions that this project would be cheap to do correctly, and I doubt a cheap hack job is what anybody wants. I am a CNC programmer/machinist and CAD designer. I have seen the laser scanner take cloud of points measurements and in a 3-D CAD program like Solidworks that image can used to create a 3-D printer file and the part can be printed in a few days time. Find a University or technical school that teaches this stuff. Students are always looking for an interesting senior project and have access to the right kind of equipment to get this done cheaper than industry can. A tall or long printer might be difficult to find but they're out there.
 

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Sure thing, just sign this purchase order authorizing me to get started!

Nobody has any illusions that this project would be cheap to do correctly, and I doubt a cheap hack job is what anybody wants. I am a CNC programmer/machinist and CAD designer. I have seen the laser scanner take cloud of points measurements and in a 3-D CAD program like Solidworks that image can used to create a 3-D printer file and the part can be printed in a few days time. Find a University or technical school that teaches this stuff. Students are always looking for an interesting senior project and have access to the right kind of equipment to get this done cheaper than industry can. A tall or long printer might be difficult to find but they're out there.
you have to keep in mind... you only have so much depth to work with.. the old school taillights are all day long as deep if not deeper than the stock 15+ taillights. So you can only engineer something into the hole that you have to work with. I too have access to 3d scanning and modeling point clouds. We use trimble/cyclone/Leica softwares for combining and weeding point cloud data. At the end of the day, if youre wanting to keep a stockish appearance its going to be rather difficult to put an 8" ball in a 6" socket.
 

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Sure thing, just sign this purchase order authorizing me to get started!

Nobody has any illusions that this project would be cheap to do correctly, and I doubt a cheap hack job is what anybody wants. I am a CNC programmer/machinist and CAD designer. I have seen the laser scanner take cloud of points measurements and in a 3-D CAD program like Solidworks that image can used to create a 3-D printer file and the part can be printed in a few days time. Find a University or technical school that teaches this stuff. Students are always looking for an interesting senior project and have access to the right kind of equipment to get this done cheaper than industry can. A tall or long printer might be difficult to find but they're out there.
and for the record, Im not trying to be argumentative.. if nothing else I'm trying to play devils advocate if for no other reason to give someone a way to overcome the hurdles I speculate and have a better gameplan... I love innovation, and I love what we can do with 3d printing and 3d modeling these days. I dont think there is any way I would ever opt in for these dinosaur taillights in my modern vehicle, but for the sake of innovation and moving forward I'm all about throwing back and forth some potential hurdles.
 
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