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Need some help folks. I replaced the thermostat in my 6.1L today with a 180 degree. I caught the coolant, close to 1.5 quarts, in a bag. Once the new thermostat was installed and the water neck torqued to 112 in lbs I took the recovered coolant and put in the recovery tank. The tank would only hold about a half of what I recovered. I started the car to check for leaks and all was good and the recover tank level dropped slightly.

I turned the car off and removed the cap on the recovery tank. There was pressure in the system and the tank magically filled so I put the cap back on and waited for the car to cool. Once cooled the recovery tank level had dropped only slightly so I did not attempt to place the remaining coolant I had recovered in the recovery tank. After a couple of hours the level in the recovery tank had not changed. I started the car again and left it run until the temp gauge reached 215 (I have not set the fans to come on at a lower temp as yet). I again checked the water neck for leaks and crap, coolant was all over the floor but not from the water neck but from the coolant recovery tank overflow. Anyone experience this type of situation and if so, what did you do?
 

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The use of aluminum cylinder blocks, cylinder heads and water pumps requires special corrosion protection. In order to maintain the required protection for these components and cooling system performance, only use the appropriate fluid when servicing the vehicle. This coolant offers the best engine cooling without corrosion when mixed with 50% distilled water to obtain a freeze point of -37° C (-35° F). If it loses color or becomes contaminated, drain, flush, and replace with fresh properly mixed coolant solution.

WARNING: Make sure engine cooling system is cool before removing pressure cap or any hose. severe personal injury may result from escaping hot coolant. The cooling system is pressurized when hot.


NOTE: Cooling system fill procedure is critical to overall cooling system performance.

1.Close radiator draincock. Hand tighten only.
2.Install engine block drain plugs, if removed. Coat the threads with Mopar® Thread Sealant with Teflon.
WARNING: When installing drain hose to air bleed valve, route hose away from accessory drive belts, accessory drive pulleys, and electric cooling fan motors.


NOTE: It may be necessary to install a bleed fitting on the 5.7L engine.

3.Attach a 1.5 - 2 m (4 - 6 ft.) long 6.35 mm (1/4 inch.) ID clear hose to bleeder fitting
  • Bleed Valve Location (2.7L): Located on the water outlet connector at the front of engine .
  • Bleed Valve Location (3.5L): Located on the lower intake manifold, left of center and below the upper intake plenum.
  • Plug Location (5.7L/6.1L): Located on the front of the water outlet housing at the front of engine.
4.Route hose (2) away from the accessory drive belt, drive pulleys and electric cooling fan. Place the other end of hose (2) into a clean container. The hose will prevent coolant from contacting the accessory drive belt when bleeding the system during the refilling operation.
NOTE: It is imperative that the cooling system air bleed valve be opened before any coolant is added to the cooling system. Failure to open the bleed valve first will result in an incomplete fill of the system.

5.5.7L/6.1L ENGINE - Install a threaded and barbed fitting (1/4 - 18 npt) into water pump housing.


6.Attach Tool 8195, Filling Aid Funnel to pressure bottle filler neck . 7.Using hose pinch-off pliers, pinch overflow hose (3) that connects between the two chambers of the coolant bottle (2). 8.Open bleed fitting.
CAUTION: Do not mix coolants. If coolant is used other than specified, a reduction in corrosion protection will occur.

9.Pour the antifreeze mixture into the larger section of Filling Aid Funnel (the smaller section of funnel is to allow air to escape). For system capacity.
10.Slowly fill the cooling system until a steady stream of coolant flows from the hose attached to the bleed valve.
11.Close the bleed valve and continue filling system to the top of the Tool 8195, Filling Aid Funnel.
12.Remove pinch-off pliers from overflow hose.
13.Allow the coolant in Filling Funnel to drain into overflow chamber of the pressure bottle.
14.Remove Tool 8195, Filling Aid Funnel. Install cap on coolant pressure bottle.
15.Remove hose from bleed valve.
16.5.7L/6.1L ENGINE - Install fitting into thermostat housing. Coat the threads with Mopar® Thread Sealant with Teflon.
17.Start engine and run at 1500 - 2000 RPM for 30 minutes.
NOTE: The engine cooling system will push any remaining air into the coolant bottle within about an hour of normal driving. As a result, a drop in coolant level in the pressure bottle may occur. If the engine cooling system overheats and pushes coolant into the overflow side of the coolant bottle, this coolant will be sucked back into the cooling system ONLY IF THE PRESSURE CAP IS LEFT ON THE BOTTLE. Removing the pressure cap breaks the vacuum path between the two bottle sections and the coolant will not return to cooling system.

18.Shut off engine allow it to cool down for 30 minutes. This permits coolant to be drawn into the pressure chamber.19.With engine COLD, observe coolant level in pressure chamber. Coolant level should be within MIN and MAX marks. Adjust coolant level as necessary.
NOTE: The coolant bottle has two chambers. Coolant will normally only be in the inboard of the two. The outboard chamber is only to recover coolant in the event of an overheat or after a recent service fill.
 

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lonestar,

GSO is the man. He's helped me many a time. I haven't read the novel above so here's the Cliff's Notes version.

First, torquing that water neck...be careful. That water pump fascia is aluminum. I'm hoping it was inch pounds, but either way, I don't think it needs to be much more than 40 ft/lb's...maybe so but dang that seems high for aluminum and that length of bolt.

OK... you just need to burp the system. Facing the engine from the nose of the car, you've got a plug in the water pump fascia (behind the pulley system) to the driver's side of the water neck and below your intake opening/thottle body. It takes a 1/4" allen wrench and that's your bleeder for the coolant. So loosen that plug (it'll be hard to turn at first) and do so when the coolant isn't hot. Air will be coming out as you fill the overflow tank with the fluid you displaced, so if you can get a second set of hands, place an absorbent towel under the bleeder plug and have someone fill the excess coolant in the overflow tank until it starts to come out of the bleeder hole. If not, put the plug in loosely and fill the tank and then come let air out of by removing the plug...going back and forth until you've got nothing but fluid coming out of the bleeder hole. You've simply got a bunch of air in there and this is the best place to bleed the system. Run the car for a while and let it cycle. Let it cool again, and do procedure again until you always get fluid pouring out of the bleeder hole once you begin to remove the allen headed plug. May take a few times....simple as that.

Welcome to the world of moddin' your car :) It's a heck of a ride.

HemiSam
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well over night I think it burped itself. I opened the hood and the coolant tank was down a shade below the MIN mark. I opened the the tank, pressure no long in the system, and put what I had left from my recovery and it took the level to the MAX COLD line. Before I started this activity the level was a bit above that line and the difference probably equals what I had to wipe off the floor. Appears all is well now. Many Thanks for the responses.
 

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Lonestar,

Strongly recommend you burp your system like I indicated above. Don't use the fluid level to assume you don't have air in your system. You'll want it all out. Good luck.

HemiSam
 
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