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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Why aren't we pushing for aftermarket fiberglass for these panels?
It would eliminate some of the rust issue and be more dent resistant.
 

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Because it's structural - and certainly here in the UK, replacing steel structural panels with fibreglass will cause an annual inspection fail!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Because it's structural - and certainly here in the UK, replacing steel structural panels with fibreglass will cause an annual inspection fail!
So, they take a magnet to every quarter panel for the 2 million mini coopers and ford fiestas running around over there?
 

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Your average MOT tester will know exactly where to look for corrosion and therefore corrosion bodges . . . Obviously he wont have experience of unusual cars - like a Challenger is over here. But he (or she) probably then takes a deeper interest anyway.

Our nicely damp climate, salt on the roads through winter, tends to be rather hard on cars - I just stripped a 2004 Mazda MX5 (miata) recently for its drivetrain - front chassis legs, rear rocker panels, rear arches, totally gone from rust - owner had "repaired" with glassfibre and bondo, plus bitumen tape, covered in underseal and paint - certainly where I go for my inspections would have failed it!

Inspection is theoretically a 45 min long examination - the testor logs the car onto the nationwide computer system, inputting the details of a physical examination of structure, bearings, suspension bushes, brake hoses and pipes, panel (no rust near important bits like suspension mounts or seatbelts), no sharp edges, no cracks or chips over a cetain size to the windscreen, brake tests, emission tests, lights . . . Done from a car being 3 yrs old, then every year. No byes, if it fails, it fails. If it fails badly, you will be recommended to not drive it away as its unroadworthy. Some things you might get a recommendation - shocks having a misting of oil (if they are leaking, or it fails the bounce test, it fails), cosmetic corrosion to structure etc.

But aside form that, I wouldn't consider it for my own safety. In my youth, I've owned and driven some real wrecks that barely passed - and bought some that really shouldn't have passed the previous test - no all testers are perfect ;)

There are some challengers over here having to have some serious metalwork done to cut out the rust caused by water sitting in the foam in the rockers - and its not exactly cost effective to ship entire quarter panels over here, so the repair panels get made to suit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Good feedback. So, what other solutions do we have to the rear rust other than storing the car in a giant dehumidifier?
 

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Good feedback. So, what other solutions do we have to the rear rust other than storing the car in a giant dehumidifier?
In my opinion, pulling the plastic rocker covers and flooding the holes with cavity wax would be a beneficial plan.

At least one person disagrees with me on the amount of cavity wax, but I'm sticking with my recommendation of flooding the holes until it drips on the floor.
 

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My 2009 SRT8 has 58 000 miles has never been driven in rain or snow and has been garage kept its entire life. Rot bubbles have developed on both sides of the car in the usual spot, this is very disappointing, also means every example will be affected. Making keeping these cars mint impossible.

In my opinion, pulling the plastic rocker covers and flooding the holes with cavity wax would be a beneficial plan.

At least one person disagrees with me on the amount of cavity wax, but I'm sticking with my recommendation of flooding the holes until it drips on the floor.
You could just drill and spray rust reformer or an oil film product but the damage is already done and once the moisture is locked inside the panels, there is no removing it and boy does the cancer grow quickly I've observed a tiny bubble grow to two inches in a year and 3 inches in two years.
 

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Such a disappointing design flaw on the part of FCA. Going to make these cars worthless on the used car lots once the majority of people hear about this.
 

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2016 Dodge Challenger SRT, Billet Silver, Black Rally Stripes, A8
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My 2009 SRT8 has 58 000 miles has never been driven in rain or snow and has been garage kept its entire life. Rot bubbles have developed on both sides of the car in the usual spot, this is very disappointing, also means every example will be affected. Making keeping these cars mint impossible.
that is extremely discouraging to hear
 

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You could just drill and spray rust reformer or an oil film product but the damage is already done and once the moisture is locked inside the panels, there is no removing it and boy does the cancer grow quickly I've observed a tiny bubble grow to two inches in a year and 3 inches in two years.
That's what I did. I had to replace the rocker valance, while I was in there I floaded the foam with an oiled filmed metal protecor while I had access to all of the wholes. I did what OregonScat suggested and filled it until it ran out through the welds under the rockers. I aimed the sprayer up high into the rear quarter too and soaked that area as well.
 
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