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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Received the new bushings and here's the theory i come up with. There is a small rib on each wall of the bushing , so there is much less contact with the fork. Less contact means less vibration. I also noticed a lot more play on the fork sliding back and forth. Will do install Saturday. I just wonder if in time these ribs will wear down. Save the old bushings!
 

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Cool. I'll be getting mine sometime this week. I plan on tearing it open again this weekend and trying to see if the new bushing does what it's supposed to. Will provide an update in my original thread. :icon_biggrin:
 

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I received and installed my today. There is definitely more slop, not much, but some. Have not driven it yet, but still feels very firm while dry-shifting.
 

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Received the new bushings and here's the theory i come up with. There is a small rib on each wall of the bushing , so there is much less contact with the fork. Less contact means less vibration. I also noticed a lot more play on the fork sliding back and forth. Will do install Saturday. I just wonder if in time these ribs will wear down. Save the old bushings!
I received and installed my today. There is definitely more slop, not much, but some. Have not driven it yet, but still feels very firm while dry-shifting.
Right on the head. The ribs make very little contact with the shifter allowing it to move with the vibrations and soak up the noise. The bracket will feel a lot looser on there but its not really the case. They are the same durometer/hardness and the same size. These bushings will only deflect the height of the rib which is only .01 then the whole bushing comes in contact with the shifter. This is what soaks up the sound yet still gives you the same firm shifts. The urethane will compress and then bounce back out, there is nothing rubbing or wearing on the bushings. They will outlast your transmission and motor Guaranteed.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Right on the head. The ribs make very little contact with the shifter allowing it to move with the vibrations and soak up the noise. The bracket will feel a lot looser on there but its not really the case. They are the same durometer/hardness and the same size. These bushings will only deflect the height of the rib which is only .01 then the whole bushing comes in contact with the shifter. This is what soaks up the sound yet still gives you the same firm shifts. The urethane will compress and then bounce back out, there is nothing rubbing or wearing on the bushings. They will outlast your transmission and motor Guaranteed.
Its amazing how great minds think alike. Prior to Barton coming up with a solution , this is what i was going to do.
 

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100% Quite as stock now!!

Just installed The replacement bushings and rubber strip. Man what a improvement! Performance of the shifter is just as good or better than the original bushings and is just as quite as the factory shifter. :headbang2:
Barton Is On It! Every M6 should have one!
 

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Just installed The replacement bushings and rubber strip. Man what a improvement! Performance of the shifter is just as good or better than the original bushings and is just as quite as the factory shifter. :headbang2:
Barton Is On It! Every M6 should have one!
DAMN! Okay I'm definitely going to install these over the weekend. I just need to find a 3/8" torque wrench that goes as low as 10ft/lbs.
 

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my install went perfect with new Barton gear!
 

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You may have better luck finding one that goes to 120 in/lbs, which is the same as 10 ft/lbs. I got mine at Home Depot, which goes from 25 in/lbs to 250 in/lbs. It's Husky part number 39102.
Yeah, my 3/8" torque wrench reads in inch lbs. Just have to do the math. The half inch one doesn't go down low enough to do 10ftlbs.

PS: Like what I'm reading on the Barton. Certainly seems like they are committed to putting out a great product and working out the bugs.
 

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You may have better luck finding one that goes to 120 in/lbs, which is the same as 10 ft/lbs. I got mine at Home Depot, which goes from 25 in/lbs to 250 in/lbs. It's Husky part number 39102.
That's great! Thanks for the lead, I'll have to head to Home Depot after work. Out of curiousity how many in/lbs would 15ft/lbs be for the rear knut?

Thanks!
 

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Cheap is not the path you wanna go when looking a torque wrenches if you plan on using one for more precise type applications - like engine work or working on motorcycles where you're tightening into aluminum pieces quite often.

Cheap ones will get you in the ballpark but a lot of them are in the +/- 10-15% range.
 

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Cheap is not the path you wanna go when looking a torque wrenches if you plan on using one for more precise type applications - like engine work or working on motorcycles where you're tightening into aluminum pieces quite often.

Cheap ones will get you in the ballpark but a lot of them are in the +/- 10-15% range.
Nothin worse then "just about getting there" and, "SNAP", goes the head...agreed, spend the coin on a decent one it'll pay itself off in no time...
 

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That's a good point. What would you guys recommend? Would Sears Craftsman be a better option for a 3/8" torque wrench? I know they are all made in China now but their tools seem decent.

That home depot one got bad reviews when I did a search for it.
 

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This one looks good, going to have to see where I can pick one up:

Sep
 

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These "new" bushings did they come out after the shifter was just released or do the come with the shifters now?
 

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That one in your link appears to be pretty good - it has good specifications. it looks like a Snap-on, it may be there "other line". Like how craftsman has that other brand they sell in stores as well. Similar designs, just a little less precise and/or robust.

I have a snap on for my smaller in-lb wrench. I got a good deal on it and wanted something a bit more accurate for dealing with lower torque value aluminum parts. My two larger ft-lb wrenches are Craftsman and I have had good luck with them. I think they are a solid mid-grade torque wrench. I also buy their hand tools though - so maybe I'm a bit biased, but I would say for the majority of people the Craftsman would be fine.

Also, if you're new to using torque wrenches. You typically want to use a wrench where the applied torque value is somewhere in the center of the range of the wrench. For example using a 40-150 ft-lb torque wrench to tighten a bunch of bolts requiring 50 ftlbs would not be as accurate as using a torque wrench that has a 10-100 ftlbs range. The springs in the wrenches yield more accurate results when working with values in the "working range" of the spring vs. when it is near full compression or full free length.

One last note - when you're done using your wrench return it to the 0 setting. Leaving the wrench sitting there with it's spring partially compressed isn't good for it.
 
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