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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2010 SRT8 w/110k miles. I installed Eibach Sportlines about 10k miles ago.

Over the past couple of months I noticed my car looks even lower?

Could this be a sign of the billstiens are going bad?

The springs are finally settling?

Or at this age/milage it's time to get a new set?

Thanks in advance!

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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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The Sportlines will put it down on the ground, no doubt, but at 110K miles, I’d say the Bilsteins are at the end of their useful service life. Replace those with new ones and see where that leaves it.
 

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I have a 2010 SRT8 w/110k miles. I installed Eibach Sportlines about 10k miles ago.

Over the past couple of months I noticed my car looks even lower?

Could this be a sign of the billstiens are going bad?

The springs are finally settling?

Or at this age/milage it's time to get a new set?

Thanks in advance!
A car that "looks" like it is even lower is a real thin reason to fund a spring/shock renewal or let alone buy a new car.

Shocks don't support the car's weight. If the car is sitting low it is due to spring sag, or one (or more) broken springs, but this is rare.

If a shock is leaking, or has lost its ability to properly dampen spring movement, that is a sign one and better both shocks of that axle be replaced and if the miles are big replacing all 4 shocks is probably best.

Have to mention I have driven a number of cars to 150K miles and beyond and have yet had to replace any springs (even though I'm sure at those miles they had sagged a bit but the tech was able to align the car with no trouble so they had not sagged too much) or shocks or any suspension/steering hardware other than a pair of front sway bar drop links when the rubber dust boots finally split and were letting dirt in. Oh, wait, I forget for this same car I had to have the axle CV joints cleaned and repacked with grease and fitted with new boots when the factory boots failed at some big miles (>250K).

Inspect or have inspected the shocks for any signs of leakage. At the same time carefully check tires for any wear that might be shock related (cupping comes to mind). You can do a "bounce" test or a tech can do this if you have the car in.

The bounce test can be used to determine if any shock has lost it dampening capability and thus it and its mate on the other end of the axle should be replaced, but I'd seriously consider replacing all 4. What would likely happen is you'd replace say the shocks on the front axle then the better behavior of the new shocks would really highlight the less acceptable behavior from the old shocks at the rear axle and you'd have the car back in to have the rear shocks replaced.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
A car that "looks" like it is even lower is a real thin reason to fund a spring/shock renewal or let alone buy a new car.

Shocks don't support the car's weight. If the car is sitting low it is due to spring sag, or one (or more) broken springs, but this is rare.

If a shock is leaking, or has lost its ability to properly dampen spring movement, that is a sign one and better both shocks of that axle be replaced and if the miles are big replacing all 4 shocks is probably best.

Have to mention I have driven a number of cars to 150K miles and beyond and have yet had to replace any springs (even though I'm sure at those miles they had sagged a bit but the tech was able to align the car with no trouble so they had not sagged too much) or shocks or any suspension/steering hardware other than a pair of front sway bar drop links when the rubber dust boots finally split and were letting dirt in. Oh, wait, I forget for this same car I had to have the axle CV joints cleaned and repacked with grease and fitted with new boots when the factory boots failed at some big miles (>250K).

Inspect or have inspected the shocks for any signs of leakage. At the same time carefully check tires for any wear that might be shock related (cupping comes to mind). You can do a "bounce" test or a tech can do this if you have the car in.

The bounce test can be used to determine if any shock has lost it dampening capability and thus it and its mate on the other end of the axle should be replaced, but I'd seriously consider replacing all 4. What would likely happen is you'd replace say the shocks on the front axle then the better behavior of the new shocks would really highlight the less acceptable behavior from the old shocks at the rear axle and you'd have the car back in to have the rear shocks replaced.
Yeah I would definitely replace all 4 for sure. I plan on keeping this car for at least 5yrs so I won't go cheap on it
The Sportlines will put it down on the ground, no doubt, but at 110K miles, I’d say the Bilsteins are at the end of their useful service life. Replace those with new ones and see where that leaves it.
Yeah that is what I'm thinking. Thank you!
 

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Bilsteins generally have a long service life - if there's leaks from the shocks, then a sure sign they're on the way out.

I have a set with 113k on them, and still as firm as when newly installed and they have the gas charge

and as @Rockster mentioned, shocks dampen the suspensions' motions, they do not support the weight of the vehicle. That's the job the springs perform
 

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Furious Fuchsia 2010 Challenger R/T Classic A5
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Eibach doesn't use the highest quality steel for their springs and I'm certain I've read about them eventually settling/sagging plenty since 2010 when I got my Challenger and joined the forums.
 
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Where do you get that?

Eibach uses the exact same technology in our street springs as we do in our legendary race springs. We use the world's finest Hi-Ten spring steel, produced to exceedingly precise tolerances. We use world-renowned German CNC coilers, as well as many unique machines engineered and built specifically by Eibach—simply state-of-the-art technology, in every step of the manufacturing process. But it's not just about machines and technology: it's about people. Most notably, the Eibach Springmeisters, working at production plants in Germany and the USA: Talented, expert craftsmen, each committed to creating the finest race—and street-Performance—springs in the world.


My springs have settled exactly zero since installed over 5 years ago

A Guy
 

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It's normal for new springs to "settle" a little at first.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Bilsteins generally have a long service life - if there's leaks from the shocks, then a sure sign they're on the way out.

I have a set with 113k on them, and still as firm as when newly installed and they have the gas charge

and as @Rockster mentioned, shocks dampen the suspensions' motions, they do not support the weight of the vehicle. That's the job the springs perform
Ah okay. I did have the car on a lift not too long ago. And I see no leaks what's so ever... Would it be noticeable?
It's normal for new springs to "settle" a little at first.
That's what I figured
 

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Me A Guy? I don't have specific references to quote on me, but when I was researching on which springs to upgrade to on my Ridetech coilovers last year I found the info. It was from a pro race shop (like for Trans Am and IMSA GT) where swapping spring weights is ordinary and part of fine tuning the suspension. The series of steel used in coil springs was talked about - 2000, 4000, 5000, 9000.

This I kept in my notes:
9000 - used by Renton & Draco
5000 - used by Swift of Japan
4000 - first used by Hyperco (and what Ridetech, Ultimate Performance and Penske use on their LX coilovers) and now other performance spring manufacturers
2000 - most OEM and standard cheap replacement springs

I ended up just going with higher rated Hypercos because of ease in acquisition compared to Renton or Draco springs in the size I needed.


Googling "sagging Eibach springs" also brings up a lot of interesting results...
 

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I've said before I am of the opinion that springs do not settle, or sag. They are high tensile steel and if a company makes a product that "may have certain specs, we can't say because they sag" it would really surprise me. I think the orientation at install, and/or the isolators may change and the installed height could change but if properly installed, they won't settle

I asked the shop I had mine installed at if I should come back after a certain time to have the alignment checked again after the springs settled. All I had read was that they settle. They said springs don't settle. And think about all the cars that stay stock, do their stock springs settle?

In any case, I don't know about Eibach race springs, but their consumer line is probably the most popular lowering springs, and if they always sagged, I doubt that would remain so. All I can say for sure, is my ride height hasn't changed from the day I had my springs installed

A Guy
 
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I've said before I am of the opinion that springs do not settle, or sag. They are high tensile steel and if a company makes a product that "may have certain specs, we can't say because they sag" it would really surprise me. I think the orientation at install, and/or the isolators may change and the installed height could change but if properly installed, they won't settle

I asked the shop I had mine installed at if I should come back after a certain time to have the alignment checked again after the springs settled. All I had read was that they settle. They said springs don't settle. And think about all the cars that stay stock, do their stock springs settle?

In any case, I don't know about Eibach race springs, but their consumer line is probably the most popular lowering springs, and if they always sagged, I doubt that would remain so. All I can say for sure, is my ride height hasn't changed from the day I had my springs installed

A Guy
I am no metallurgist but I always thought that springs "settle" (not sag) rather quickly after a load is placed on them. Sort of like the grain structure adjusting to the permanent load stresses.On a new car it would have already happened by the time the vehicle reached the consumer. Anecdotal but when I put an 8" lift kit with new springs on my old Ford Bronco I measured it's ride height. I seem to remember it dropping a little in the first week. But that could have been for a myriad of reasons and may have been totally unrelated to the springs.
 

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That's a blanket statement and I can tell you from experience it is not accurate. One only need replace struts/shocks if they need it and age alone is not mean they need to be replaced.
My Firehawk's are 20 years old and have the original suspension components. But being garage kept and less the 7K miles, they still drive like new. Just sayin' ;)
 

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I am no metallurgist but I always thought that springs "settle" (not sag) rather quickly after a load is placed on them. Sort of like the grain structure adjusting to the permanent load stresses.On a new car it would have already happened by the time the vehicle reached the consumer. Anecdotal but when I put an 8" lift kit with new springs on my old Ford Bronco I measured it's ride height. I seem to remember it dropping a little in the first week. But that could have been for a myriad of reasons and may have been totally unrelated to the springs.
By definition a spring should not settle quickly. If it does it does not deserve the spring name.

With a new car that does not manifest any alignment issues off the dealer showroom I'll drive the car until the tires need to be replaced, then have the alignment done to account for any settling of the springs or changes arising from the rubber bushings of the steering/suspension/drive train hardware.

'course, as I drive the car if I notice any signs of abnormal tire wear that point to an alignment problem I'll have the car in for an alignment sooner.

My Firehawk's are 20 years old and have the original suspension components. But being garage kept and less the 7K miles, they still drive like new. Just sayin' ;)
Age and lack of use might lead to at least the shocks going "bad" -- I'm thinking lack of use could result in seal degradation and leakage -- but none of my cars have been garage queens.

For 3 cars I put over 150K miles on them and a 4th I put over 300K miles on it. For this last car more than once over the years I talked to the techs about a suspension refresh and every time they talked me out of by pointing out the shocks/suspension bushings/etc. were just fine.

With the other cars that I drove to 150K miles and a bit beyond not one required new shocks or any suspension refreshing. The ride/handling and tire life were just fine.
 

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One word...."Salads"...
 

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A Guy
 
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