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I’m rotating my tires my self and was curious if there’s any special pattern I need to do? I have 265 all around do I just move back to front and front tires to back?
 

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The diagram above is correct. You can always go front to back, but the tires will wear better if you cross the fronts over.
 

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2018 Dodge Challenger T/A Plus in Yellow Jacket w/5.7L and A8 automatic
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The diagram above is correct. You can always go front to back, but the tires will wear better if you cross the fronts over.
Correct....any uneven “feathering” of the front tires will go away soon when they‘re on the drive axle, turning in the opposite direction from where they came.

Additionally....the rotation pattern mentioned above by @Slwkat also insures that each tire will be on each corner of the car at some time or other.

I’ve used the above rotation pattern for YEARS with outstanding results.
 
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I’m rotating my tires my self and was curious if there’s any special pattern I need to do? I have 265 all around do I just move back to front and front tires to back?
Depends upon the tires. If the tires are directional they should only be moved from front to back and back to front keeping the tires on the same side of the car so the tires always "face" front and thus conform to the tire rotation direction the manufacturer calls for.

If the tires are not directional they can be rotated in the criss-cross pattern.

My Hellcat tire wear is pretty even front to back and side to side I don't bother with rotating the tires.
 

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When I was in college (early 2000’s) I worked at America’s Tire Co. We always rotated Front To Back, Cross the Rears to the Front, which is basically the same as the diagram above, just in reverse. I’ve done it that way ever since and never had any issues. Every tire ends up on every corner of the car for even wear.
 

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When I was in college (early 2000’s) I worked at America’s Tire Co. We always rotated Front To Back, Cross the Rears to the Front, which is basically the same as the diagram above, just in reverse. I’ve done it that way ever since and never had any issues. Every tire ends up on every corner of the car for even wear.
Sounds like you saw mostly front wheel drive cars. Their pattern is the opposite of above.

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When I was in college (early 2000’s) I worked at America’s Tire Co. We always rotated Front To Back, Cross the Rears to the Front, which is basically the same as the diagram above, just in reverse. I’ve done it that way ever since and never had any issues. Every tire ends up on every corner of the car for even wear.
Some of the cars I have owned came with directional tires. These can't -- or should not be at any rate -- be rotated in such a way the tire is rotating in the wrong direction. A front to back and back to front cross rotation pattern would have the directional tires facing the wrong way.

Other cars I have owned have had staggered wheels/tires which for obvious reasons could not be rotated.

Really my preference is to not rotate tires. I try to drive in such a way that tire wear is even and thus no need to rotate tires to balance the wear.
 

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I've given up on rotations too, but an easier way to get it done is to get a cheap spare or extra wheel. Now you do the above cross rotation without having to get the whole car off the ground. Jack the right side first and put the extra wheel on the rear and then do the rest. Way easier and safer than trying to get the whole car up on jackstands.



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I've given up on rotations too, but an easier way to get it done is to get a cheap spare or extra wheel. Now you do the above cross rotation without having to get the whole car off the ground. Jack the right side first and put the extra wheel on the rear and then do the rest. Way easier and safer than trying to get the whole car up on jackstands.



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I don't understand the fear of getting these cars up on 4 jackstands. Never had a problem with it, mine used to be up in the air at least once per month.

Now that I have a second set of wheels and tires, I do want you mentioned above. It's almost like a slightly different car each time, going from a high performance tire on my 5 Deep wheels to the Pirelli All-Seasons on my Slingshots (which ride quite a bit quieter and smoother than my PS4s but clearly don't perform as well).
 

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I do tire rotations using my spare and the scissor jack. Take first tire off, replace with spare, work around to spare, replace with last tire, all good. Gives me an excuse to clean the inside of the tire and apply dressing, also clean and coat the barrels of the wheels

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IMHO, if you run a square set up, then you should be rotating your tires. Even if its just front to back.
It is an effective way to keep even wear, get the most mileage and keep the best performance out of your tires.

This is especially true when running a "summer only/high performance" tire. They are soft/sticky and (obviously) don't have near the same wear characteristics as an "all season" tire.

A V8 Challenger weighs an easy 4,200lbs (Hellcats are heavier still) with 55 percent of that weight sitting on the front. (Hellcats, again, carry an even higher percentage.)

If you push these cars hard in the corners you will eat up the front tires faster than the rears. Most of the wear will be on inner/outer shoulders. The fronts also carry the biggest percentage of braking. The tire wear from rolling resistance is minimal, compared to stopping these heavy cars quickly from high speeds. (Those 4/ 6 piston Brembos aren't on the front for weight distribution) This wears the fronts even more. The wear pattern fluctuates, depending on where the fronts are pointed when you stomp on the binders.

Any V8 Challenger has a lot of off idle power. It was very easy to "chirp" the rear tires, by accident, when I had my A8 SRT392 Challenger.
It would happen when quickly pulling away from a stop sign or traffic light. (This was with factory 275 P- Zeros)

Honestly, it was somewhat of a learning curve to get a quick 0-60 mph time without just burning them up in 1'st and 2nd gear. I can only imagine the traction issues with a Hellcat or Redeye.
These occasional burn/chirps all add up. Luckly, most of the wear is flat across the tread, with the inner/outer shoulders remaining intact.
This opposite front to rear wear pattern, works out perfectly for a tire rotation.

The rotation also gives you a chance to check your brake pad thickness, look for loose, worn, leaking components,ect.
Matter of fact, even if you personally can't or don't want to do it, many tire stores will do FREE tire rotations if you bought the tires from them.

It doesn't get any easier than that.
 

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I put my Challenger on 4 stands and take the opportunity to clean the wheel well and the rims including applying a good coat of wax. I do it every oil change in my driveway...
 

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I put my Challenger on 4 stands and take the opportunity to clean the wheel well and the rims including applying a good coat of wax. I do it every oil change in my driveway...
I've been hesitate to try and put the car on jack stands. I guess I've never had to do so I'd rather see it done before trying it myself. I'm used to just crawling under my truck to do service to it.

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I don't understand the fear of getting these cars up on 4 jackstands. Never had a problem with it, mine used to be up in the air at least once per month.

Now that I have a second set of wheels and tires, I do want you mentioned above. It's almost like a slightly different car each time, going from a high performance tire on my 5 Deep wheels to the Pirelli All-Seasons on my Slingshots (which ride quite a bit quieter and smoother than my PS4s but clearly don't perform as well).
These cars and this is true of almost all cars nowadays is they have just two factory sanctioned ways of being lifted and supported. One is by the tires. This is great for oil/filter services.

The other is by body or chassis lift points which are designed to support the weight of the car without the sheet metal deforming.

But the vast majority of car owners do not have a lift which can lift the car by its tires or by its factory sanctioned hard lift/support points.

And the factory realizes this.

For my Hellcat the owners manual for jacking the car the manual offers this: "In the case where it is necessary to raise the vehicle, go to an authorized dealer or service station."

This recognizes the fact one can lift the car and support the car by its tires or the other lift/support points but there is no factory recognized way to lift the car by the hard lift points and then support the car by placing jack stands anywhere else.

All those owners who think otherwise are lifting the car and supporting in a way that was not intended by the factory.

For these cars if one wants to service the car and do other things to it that require the car be lifted up really to do this right he needs to have a portable hydraulic lift system that can lift/support the car by its tires or can lift/support the car by the same lift points used when the car is lifted in the dealer service bay.
 

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I've been hesitate to try and put the car on jack stands. I guess I've never had to do so I'd rather see it done before trying it myself. I'm used to just crawling under my truck to do service to it.

Will-
I recently installed Eibach lowering spring and had the car on jack stands. As long as the floor is level and you have good quality jack stands (Not Harbor Freight LOL) you should be good to rotate tires and clean the wheel wells, etc...
999671
 

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I put my car up on 4 jacks at a minimum every 5000 miles for tire rotations. Took me a minute to figure it out at first because of the pinch welds, but now I’ve got it down easy.
 

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I drove rotational tires for so long on my past cars, I didn't even check my Coopers when I rotated them a few weeks ago. I just did the normal front to back and back to front without crossing to the other side. I suspect they will be fine. BTW, always clean the wheel well liners when rotating tires. A good dose of a tire shine product (liquid or foam) does a good job. (y)

EDIT: Just checked and they are not rotational tires. Oh well, if I get ambitious next time I may use the crisscross pattern. But, I doubt it. 🤣
 
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EDIT: Just checked and they are not rotational tires. Oh well, if I get ambitious next time I may use the crisscross pattern. But, I doubt it. 🤣
So......simply rotate the rear tires today. That’s really all that‘s needed.
 
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