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I have a 2014 dodge challenger and do the oil changes myself and have read about people prefilling their oil filters and others being strictly against so. Is there a wrong or right away ? Or is It really just preference ? My filter goes up right so I prefill, but I know others are upside down or horizontal so I understand why those wouldn't be prefilled.

Thanks guys
 

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Every car I have ever owned I've filled the filter and put oil on the o'ring. I just fill it full one time I don't keep topping it off as it settles....
 

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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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In reality it won’t matter, but since your filter is right side up, you might as well pre-fill it. It certainly won’t hurt!

Also, don’t forget to double-check that the old filter’s rubber gasket isn’t still on the filter housing.

If the previous filter leaves its gasket behind and you screw on a new filter over it, you will have a messy, possibly expensive surprise to clean up shortly after the engine is started and driven.
 

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Over time, not prefilling could cause more bearing wear. Especially for those who have Hellcats, REs and Demons that require draining the oil cooler.
Bottom line, it can't hurt.
 

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2021 JEEP Wrangler Unlimited Willys 4X4
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Prime / pre-fill whenever possible.
 
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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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In my humble opinion, it is far more important to make sure the oil filter being installed has an ADBV in the bottom than it is to prefill it at the oil change.

A filter without an ADBV will do what the empty filter at oil change startup does, but it will do it many times over the course of an OCI. Whereas the empty filter (with an ADBV) at oil change startup only does it that one time.
 

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2020 Dodge Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack
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I have a 2014 dodge challenger and do the oil changes myself and have read about people prefilling their oil filters and others being strictly against so. Is there a wrong or right away ? Or is It really just preference ? My filter goes up right so I prefill, but I know others are upside down or horizontal so I understand why those wouldn't be prefilled.

Thanks guys
It has been my habit when doing my own oil changes if the filter mounts vertically to fill the filter with fresh/clean oil. This besides taking the time to smear a bit of clean oil on the gasket (or o-ring for my cars that used a filter and canister) and to make sure where the filter gasket seals that surface is clean.

When I have been at the dealer and observed the techs doing an oil change they lube the gasket (or o-ring) but they do not fill the filter.

If the factory service manual oil change procedure has this step I'd do it. If it doesn't I'd probably still do it as long as the filter was mounted in such a way the oil would not spill when I installed the new filter.
 

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Also, don’t forget to double-check that the old filter’s rubber gasket isn’t still on the filter housing.

If the previous filter leaves its gasket behind and you screw on a new filter over it, you will have a messy, possibly expensive surprise to clean up shortly after the engine is started and driven.
I learned this the hard way over 20 years ago. I was young and didn't know this could happen. Did an oil change on my truck, started it up, and oil started spewing out underneath pretty much right away. After the initial freak-out phase, I saw it was coming from the filter, took it off, couldn't figure out what was wrong, then looked at my original filter to see if there was something different with the new one, when I realized my original was missing the gasket. Looked up on the engine block and sure enough, there was the original gasket stuck on.

Since then, I've always been OCD with checking the gasket and making sure to dip my finger in the fresh oil and run some over the gasket.

And I have always pre-filled the filter too, but also just fill it once. I just want some oil in there, no need to top it off.
 

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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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I learned this the hard way over 20 years ago. I was young and didn't know this could happen. Did an oil change on my truck, started it up, and oil started spewing out underneath pretty much right away. After the initial freak-out phase, I saw it was coming from the filter, took it off, couldn't figure out what was wrong, then looked at my original filter to see if there was something different with the new one, when I realized my original was missing the gasket. Looked up on the engine block and sure enough, there was the original gasket stuck on.

Since then, I've always been OCD with checking the gasket and making sure to dip my finger in the fresh oil and run some over the gasket.

And I have always pre-filled the filter too, but also just fill it once. I just want some oil in there, no need to top it off.
The oil filter isn’t the only thing to watch out for old gaskets causing trouble. I spent 30 minutes the other day trying to get a new low beam headlight bulb fully locked into the headlight housing before realizing the little gasket that seals them once locked in place was still there preventing me from getting the new one locked.

I must have invented 3 or 4 new cuss words once I came upon the realization I had been so bull-headed for so long trying to get that bulb locked instead of pulling it out and investigating what was going on.
 

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Anyone remember the old Valvoline commercial where Val the chimp changes the oil? Even put oil on the gasket with it's finger, lol

A Guy
 

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One thing that I absolutely love about the 3.6L engine in the V6 Challengers is the oil filter design. Not sure why other manufacturers don't use this type of design more often, but it is so much nicer than the "canister" style filters. No mess and super easy to replace - from the top of the engine. :)

I've always pre-filled the canister-style filters on other cars, but I'm assuming that you can't "pre-fill" the cartridge-style oil filters with the 3.6L V6, correct?
 

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One thing that I absolutely love about the 3.6L engine in the V6 Challengers is the oil filter design. Not sure why other manufacturers don't use this type of design more often, but it is so much nicer than the "canister" style filters. No mess and super easy to replace - from the top of the engine. :)

I've always pre-filled the canister-style filters on other cars, but I'm assuming that you can't "pre-fill" the cartridge-style oil filters with the 3.6L V6, correct?
All my Porsche cars and I think my VW Golf TDi used a canister type oil filter. My first exposure to this type of filter -- ignoring my Honda CB 750 motorcycle which used a canister type filter but which I bought an adapter plate and then was able to use a (small FRAM) cartridge filter.

Kind of liked the canister filter. Had a chance to see what the filter was catching. For the Boxster and Cayman I could pre fill the filter with oil. The filters mounted veritically. The Turbo (and I think the VW filter) were accessible from the top and there was no prefilling.

A little more work to change/replace but not a lot. And I had the procedure down pat. Always had a second housing and it was clean and stored in a bag. When time to change the oil I'd use the clean canister then after the change was over with clean the canister I just removed and bag it for next time. A 2nd canister also provided me with a spare just in case but I never needed one.
 

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I've always pre-filled the canister-style filters on other cars, but I'm assuming that you can't "pre-fill" the cartridge-style oil filters with the 3.6L V6, correct?
Not unless you are very skilled :)

996162


A Guy
 

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Not unless you are very skilled :)

View attachment 996162

A Guy
Yeah - I get that you can't really pour any oil into the filter itself, but I wasn't sure if it was worthwhile to pour some oil into the "cavity" where you install the cartridge or not. Not sure how that is designed - would the oil just immediately drain into the oil pan or would it be a slow drain where the oil filter could soak a lot of it up when installed? Or would it even be worth while to "dip" the filter into fresh oil and let it soak up oil before being installed?

I've never had a car with this type of oil filter system, so I was just curious if anything does anything similar to the "pre-fill" for the canister-type filters....
 

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Anyone remember the old Valvoline commercial where Val the chimp changes the oil? Even put oil on the gasket with it's finger, lol

A Guy
I don't remember that commercial.

Here's another one though. I think it was Mobile 1, but I could be wrong there. Anyway, they had 2 engines running, one with regular oil, one with synthetic. They pulled the drain plugs on each oil pan while the engines were running. The engine with regular oil died, while the other kept running. I look back now and think that there is no way that is possible. Both engines would be toast within seconds.
 

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In my humble opinion, it is far more important to make sure the oil filter being installed has an ADBV in the bottom than it is to prefill it at the oil change.

A filter without an ADBV will do what the empty filter at oil change startup does, but it will do it many times over the course of an OCI. Whereas the empty filter (with an ADBV) at oil change startup only does it that one time.
Two things- if the filter is positioned gasket up, why would an ADBV be needed and does the SRT oil filter have one?
 

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The Pentastar oil filter cavity is part of the oil cooler.

996180


I have to assume the cooler drains as soon as the engine is off. I know when you pull the filter the cavity is empty. I think in this instance the oil is pumped to the filter and cooler after it's pumped through the engine, so unlike a bottom filter, it's not part of the first oil the engine sees. I don't see any advantage to soaking it first.

With a standard oil filter there would be some small delay as the filter filled with oil, the Pentastar filter never "fills up", so that issue is not there

A Guy
 
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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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Two things- if the filter is positioned gasket up, why would an ADBV be needed and does the SRT oil filter have one?
1). Inclined/declined parking
2). Hellifiknow, but it would seem odd if it didn’t.
 

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I've never pre filled my filters on any cars or trucks.
 
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