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I have a 2016 challenger sxt, after almost 2 months of having it, got a rattling noise, thought it was rocker arm, took to the dealership where I got it from and they said it was something deep in the engine, I don't have a warranty. They gave me the option of buying a used v6 or a new one to replace and they would put it in for me, I was thinking of getting a v8 and having them put it in, I'm not experienced in cars so I don't know all the requirements to do this, is this a good idea?
 

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The dealer won't put in the V8 for you they will only put in what was taken out, customer pay or not. It isn't exactly a plug-and-play swap. It can be done with the right expertise and amount of money. If you still owe money on it I would recommend you put a used (but still good) V6 back in it. You would likely take the lowest value hit in that scenario because at least the engine type still matches the VIN if you were to trade it in or sell it in the future. If someone checks the VIN and it indicates a V6 but there is a V8 in the car a savvy prospective buyer will likely turn it down or offer far less because of potential problems from a botched swap. If a dealership runs the VIN and sees the discrepancy you can forget about any type of reasonable offer because they likely will ship it straight to auction.

If you want a V8 do it the right way and either take the hit on the broken trade now OR put a used V6 back in it, drive it until the market cools then trade up for a V8. You will come out ahead monetarily in the long run and probably save a lot of headaches too.
 

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If you put in a V8, you are opening up a can of worms. You'll also need a larger rear axle, and some bigger brakes. I'm not sure about the transmission either.
 

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Save yourself a lot of headaches and money. Stay OEM. If you want a V8, trade and buy one.
 
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I have to agree with the other posters, put in the best condition lowest miles V6 you can afford, preferably with some type of warranty on it and labor.

The V8 swap raises to many complications. First, finding someone to do it will be difficult and probably not warrantied. Next, as others mentioned, other parts may not be compatible or also need upgrading, such as the transmission, axle, brakes, suspension, drivetrain, who knows. But the point is the cars are designed ground up with each part in mind. These aren't 1970 era cars where "plug and play" was somewhat less complex.

Finally, a new certified warrantied professionally installed V6 may keep or improve the value of the car, depending on mileage, etc. of the motor. A V8 might scare off buyers since it's not the correct engine... so it could actually harm resale later.
 

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2018 R/T 6M
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How many miles did you put on it? You mentioned you only had it 2 months. Are you on the hook for the full engine swap price or is the dealer sharing some of the costs?

Other than that, I agree with the other comments.
 

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A V8 Upgrade is not just a swap out and takes a ton of work parts and not advisable, there are many Wrecked SXT's so you should be able to get another engine fair price.
 

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The dealer won't put in the V8 for you they will only put in what was taken out, customer pay or not. It isn't exactly a plug-and-play swap. It can be done with the right expertise and amount of money. If you still owe money on it I would recommend you put a used (but still good) V6 back in it. You would likely take the lowest value hit in that scenario because at least the engine type still matches the VIN if you were to trade it in or sell it in the future. If someone checks the VIN and it indicates a V6 but there is a V8 in the car a savvy prospective buyer will likely turn it down or offer far less because of potential problems from a botched swap. If a dealership runs the VIN and sees the discrepancy you can forget about any type of reasonable offer because they likely will ship it straight to auction.

If you want a V8 do it the right way and either take the hit on the broken trade now OR put a used V6 back in it, drive it until the market cools then trade up for a V8. You will come out ahead monetarily in the long run and probably save a lot of headaches too.
Good advice - & yes dealer will not put an V8 in place of 6.
 

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2021 SPWB Shaker A8
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Don't try to swap in a V8. It's not a 1971 with just a battery and distributor connection to the motor. The number of parts you'll have to change out just to make the engine work will cost you more than the upgrade to an R/T.

I have to agree with the other posters, put in the best condition lowest miles V6 you can afford, preferably with some type of warranty on it and labor.

The V8 swap raises to many complications. First, finding someone to do it will be difficult and probably not warrantied. Next, as others mentioned, other parts may not be compatible or also need upgrading, such as the transmission, axle, brakes, suspension, drivetrain, who knows. But the point is the cars are designed ground up with each part in mind. These aren't 1970 era cars where "plug and play" was somewhat less complex.

Finally, a new certified warrantied professionally installed V6 may keep or improve the value of the car, depending on mileage, etc. of the motor. A V8 might scare off buyers since it's not the correct engine... so it could actually harm resale later.
Parts that would have to be changed should include a PCM for a V8, larger radiator, probably an instrument cluster since you now have a PCM expecting a different speedometer, and that's just off the top of my head. It would be a nightmare and would probably cost more than the car is worth to get it right, IF you could find someone to do it.
 

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Parts that would have to be changed should include a PCM for a V8, larger radiator, probably an instrument cluster since you now have a PCM expecting a different speedometer, and that's just off the top of my head. It would be a nightmare and would probably cost more than the car is worth to get it right, IF you could find someone to do it.
Don't forget a new engine wiring harness and a tuner that can make the new PCM and the existing BCM talk to each other and play nice...
 

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This info. is very disheartening to read,,,,I was born in the 50s and my FATHER bought a couple of RoadRunners that got handed down to my brother and I as we GOT EXPERIENCE IN DEFENSIVE DRIVING. When the Challenger came back I was soooo excited because it looked like the Challenger of old and not like all the newer cars. I wasn't going to go BACK to a rear wheel drive nor did I think it would make sense to get an 8 cyl. Since I never buy a "first year production" vehicle, I waited to treat myself to a 2018 GT and when I took one for a test drive I put it through it's paces and tested out the Sport mode--I think the salesman was taken back a little. My 2018 just turned 7400 because it is my alternate vehicle. So far my NAVIGATION system is the only thing that has given me problems and they had to replace the radio. Now I'm praying that I don't encounter any of the problems that individuals are posting. Best of luck to all of you having issues and stand your ground!! God Bless, MOPARGIRL
 
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