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So I detailed my car this weekend and applied sealant.

How should I wash my car so I don't remove the sealant?

Will a rinse and 2-bucket wash work just fine? I did not apply wax this time, but I plan to whenever I wash the car again.
 

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Sealant is designed to last longer than wax so you should be good for the summer and then some. 1 year for sealant, 6 months for wax. If yours is a garage queen, like mine, no worries.
 

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Sealant is designed to last longer than wax so you should be good for the summer and then some. 1 year for sealant, 6 months for wax. If yours is a garage queen, like mine, no worries.
Doesn't mean it won't get dusty after a week.
 

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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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So I detailed my car this weekend and applied sealant.

How should I wash my car so I don't remove the sealant?

Will a rinse and 2-bucket wash work just fine? I did not apply wax this time, but I plan to whenever I wash the car again.
As long as you use a car wash soap which is designed for washing cars, you won't strip the sealant off just by washing it.

Now, if you were to use something like dish washing soap, then yes, it would wreak havoc on any wax/sealant you had applied to the paint.

Other products which may remove any wax/sealants:
1) bug & tar remover - some are stronger than others, but all will attack the wax/sealant to some extent.
2) wheel & tire cleaner - same as above, some will do more harm to wax/sealants than others, but all will likely attack the wax/sealants to some extent.
3) non-automotive soaps/shampoos - using anything to wash the car which wasn't meant for use in washing a car is a bad idea.

One more thing to mention related to this topic: it's is usually a good idea to avoid getting any water on your car's paint in the first 24 hours after application of a wax or sealant. That is to ensure the product has had enough time to properly bond to the paint for maximum protection and durability.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
As long as you use a car wash soap which is designed for washing cars, you won't strip the sealant off just by washing it.

Now, if you were to use something like dish washing soap, then yes, it would wreak havoc on any wax/sealant you had applied to the paint.

Other products which may remove any wax/sealants:
1) bug & tar remover - some are stronger than others, but all will attack the wax/sealant to some extent.
2) wheel & tire cleaner - same as above, some will do more harm to wax/sealants than others, but all will likely attack the wax/sealants to some extent.
3) non-automotive soaps/shampoos - using anything to wash the car which wasn't meant for use in washing a car is a bad idea.

One more thing to mention related to this topic: it's is usually a good idea to avoid getting any water on your car's paint in the first 24 hours after application of a wax or sealant. That is to ensure the product has had enough time to properly bond to the paint for maximum protection and durability.
Got it, just wanted to make sure I wasn't going to be undoing an entire 90 degrees day's work, LOL.
 

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The Bacon Hauler (‘12 Cop Charger)
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Got it, just wanted to make sure I wasn't going to be undoing an entire 90 degrees day's work, LOL.
Yep, on any given weekend, I can usually be found under the hood of my car, under the car itself, hovering over the car in some fashion, or just generally in very close vicinity to it contemplating what to do next on it or to it. That is, except for weekends in July and August. The daytime temps in my garage during those two months get above 100F quickly and stay there until after dark (and rarely get below 85F during the night!). That pretty much saps any desire I might have to futz around with my car. :crying:

And on the few occasions when I am confronted with some maintenance task or break/fix which cannot wait, I still only do it at night when the temps are the lowest. Though 'lowest' only means 'not akin to a blast-furnace' in this case, and I'll still be a sweating, shaking, dizzy mess when I complete whatever task I had to spend the night doing, mostly because of the un-godly humidity around here. :mad:

I've heard tales told of magical places that supposedly exist somewhere out there that are basically garages like we have, but they are also air-conditioned! I have not been able to verify such nirvanas actually do exist, but I am actively looking for one every chance I get!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yep, on any given weekend, I can usually be found under the hood of my car, under the car itself, hovering over the car in some fashion, or just generally in very close vicinity to it contemplating what to do next on it or to it. That is, except for weekends in July and August. The daytime temps in my garage during those two months get above 100F quickly and stay there until after dark (and rarely get below 85F during the night!). That pretty much saps any desire I might have to futz around with my car. :crying:

And on the few occasions when I am confronted with some maintenance task or break/fix which cannot wait, I still only do it at night when the temps are the lowest. Though 'lowest' only means 'not akin to a blast-furnace' in this case, and I'll still be a sweating, shaking, dizzy mess when I complete whatever task I had to spend the night doing, mostly because of the un-godly humidity around here. :mad:

I've heard tales told of magical places that supposedly exist somewhere out there that are basically garages like we have, but they are also air-conditioned! I have not been able to verify such nirvanas actually do exist, but I am actively looking for one every chance I get!
Good luck friend, maybe you should buy a patch of land and build it yourself.

:rofl:
 
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