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I've got an '18 SPS and I'm certainly aware that the water pumps in these motors have a tendency to quit randomly.

I haven't experienced water pump failure yet, so I'm wondering if there's anything I can do to prolong the life of my water pump. Is there possibly a difference between failure rates between manual and automatic cars?

Additionally, when the time comes to replace, is there a better solution than to simply swap in an OEM piece?
 

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I have replaced the WP in my JGC twice (once at 25k and just recently at around 75k if I remember correctly). I also replaced the pump on my challenger at around 20k only because I was going to tap a thread on the housing and noticed scuff marks from the impeller on the housing. Nothing you can do really to prevent it...luck of the draw I guess? I bought my replacements from rockauto. The JGC now has almost 110kmiles on the clock and no issue so far. The challenger is approaching 30k and no problems...plus I am running a thump racing tensioner and SC so I am sure it's abusing the bearing good and proper.
 

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I've got an '18 SPS and I'm certainly aware that the water pumps in these motors have a tendency to quit randomly.

I haven't experienced water pump failure yet, so I'm wondering if there's anything I can do to prolong the life of my water pump. Is there possibly a difference between failure rates between manual and automatic cars?

Additionally, when the time comes to replace, is there a better solution than to simply swap in an OEM piece?
All I have done over the years is to change the coolant every 4 years or so. Drain and refill with fresh mix of antifreeze and distilled water. No flush necessary.

The antifreeze has additives that help the water pump seal stay healthy and in some cases even if the seal lets some coolant by-- which I've been told is "normal" but the amount passed by the seal is very small -- the coolant is bearing (grease) friendly.

The fresh coolant also helps prolong hose life and can keep the thin walls of the radiator and heater core from developing a pinhole leak.

The only water pumps that have failed have been in my Boxster at 172K miles and my Porsche 996 Turbo at around 120K miles. (I have replaced water pumps in other engines that I have rebuilt and in engines of family member cars.)

The one in the Boxster the bearing wore out and the water pump got noisy and that is what clued me in it was bad. The one in the Turbo leaked -- smelled the odor of antifreeze on a hot day as was helping my Mom get in the car. The leak most likely due to the fact the first 6 years the car's first owner only drove the car around 1666 miles/year and certainly did not have the coolant drained and the cooling system refilled with fresh coolant.

Course, you still have to keep your eyes (leaks), ears (noises) and nose (odor from a leak) open for any sign of trouble from a water pump. They can go bad at any time.

Be sure you change the accessory drive belt on schedule.

For replacement pumps I've always gone with the factory pumps. While they have failed -- as I noted above -- the service life was reasonable and in the case of the Boxster the replacement pump went in at 172K miles and was still working just fine at 317K miles, 145K miles later. The Turbo replacement pump had around 40K miles on it when I sold the car and the water pump was fine.

Always replace the T-stat when replacing a water pump. If I do the work myself I test the old and new T-stat in a pot of water on the stove with a thermometer to verify the new T-stat opens at the right temperature (and ideally the old T-stat does too) and the new one opens fully. Ditto the old T-stat. That the new T-stat and the old T-stat behave the same means that when you put the new T-stat in service the coolant temperature behavior remains the same.
 

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Lots of good info has been put out here already.
Not much you can do to prevent a failure just be mindful of new noises and smells so you catch a failure early.
My Challenger had 60k on it with the stock pump before I went electric, no problems out of it.


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I have posted a couple of vids that shows an example of pump failure on my 5.7 JGC but since the new search engine here is not as good as the old version, here are the vids.

Bearing play

Sound of a bad pump
 
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