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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys
So I had a bad water pump
Replaced it, after maybe 1 or 2 weeks it shows leakage again
Tightened up the bolts and its leaking less now much less
But it's still leaking
Some say my gasket is pinched or I didn't apply any sort of sealant around the gasket

Now what's the solution here?
Remove the water pump again and apply sealant around the gasket or replace gasket and put sealant around it?
I'm fedup of it leaking, what's the use of a new water pump when it leaks again, I'm pretty sure I Installed it incorrectly but the gasket alone should be fine to avoid leaking.

Thanks in advance for any help. Need this solved please. Its the third time it's doing it. 2013 R/T.
 

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You will need to determine where the leak is taking place. If it is leaking out of the water pump weep hole or bypassing the shaft seal, you will need to replace the water pump. If it is leaking at the gasket, you will need to remove the pump, carefully clean both gasket surfaces on the block or timing case cover as well as the pump. Obtain a new gasket, apply a thin coat of gasket sealer on both sides and reinstall the pump. Fill the cooling system with water and bleed. Start engine, let the system come up to temperature and look for leaks. Make sure you also turn on the heater to bleed out any air trapped in the heater core. If no leaks, drain & refill with the proper coolant.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You will need to determine where the leak is taking place. If it is leaking out of the water pump weep hole or bypassing the shaft seal, you will need to replace the water pump. If it is leaking at the gasket, you will need to remove the pump, carefully clean both gasket surfaces on the block or timing case cover as well as the pump. Obtain a new gasket, apply a thin coat of gasket sealer on both sides and reinstall the pump. Fill the cooling system with water and bleed. Start engine, let the system come up to temperature and look for leaks. Make sure you also turn on the heater to bleed out any air trapped in the heater core. If no leaks, drain & refill with the proper coolant.
Where is the weep hole exactly so I can check? The pump is only 1 month old so I doubt its that but worth a check. Its leaking around the edges of the pump. That's where I can see the leakages coming from at the moment. Last time I worked on it all I did was tighten up the bolts more and it's leaking from just the top only now. Before it was leaking from the left top and the right side. Regaridng cleaning, just with a rag or what?
 

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Weep holes are usually located on the underside of the pump housing underneath the pump shaft housing.

I don’t claim to be an expert on this, but of the many water pumps I have replaced over the years on a variety of vehicles, I have used RTV sealant 100% of the time. Start off with a new, dry gasket and use sealant as mentioned previously. The fact that you reduced the leak by tightening the bolts suggests a gasket issue and not a bad pump bearing.
 

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Where is the weep hole exactly so I can check? The pump is only 1 month old so I doubt its that but worth a check. Its leaking around the edges of the pump. That's where I can see the leakages coming from at the moment. Last time I worked on it all I did was tighten up the bolts more and it's leaking from just the top only now. Before it was leaking from the left top and the right side. Regaridng cleaning, just with a rag or what?
I would have to see the pump to locate the weep hole. They are usually located on the part of the casting where the shaft extends out to the front. If it is only leaking from the top, you may just try & drive the car a bit and with the thermal expansion & contraction of the metal, the leak may seal itself as long as it is just a few drops. To clean the surfaces, I would use a wire brush to get all of the old gasket material off. You can also buy some aerosol sprays that will soften & remove old gasket material. Be careful not to gouge the sealing surface up if you use a still gasket scraper or putty knife.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Here's some pics. Removed the water pump, any issues you guys can see with it? Some of the bolts had coolant on the threads. Also the bolts are in order from left of how I removed them clockwise starting from the top left of the water pump. Are they in their correct locations?

IMG_20190805_110341.jpg


IMG_20190805_105917.jpg


FB_IMG_1564992086104.jpg


FB_IMG_1564992090803.jpg


IMG_20190805_110334.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Update: Got grey colour RTV gasket sealer and brake cleaner to clean the surface, let's see how it goes now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The hose clamp is doing my head in, I've been trying since yesterday to get the clamp from the lower hose connected onto the water pump hose, theres not enough space to clamp it and when I do try it's impossible to get clamped any more. What tool should I use??
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The hose clamp is doing my head in, I've been trying since yesterday to get the clamp from the lower hose connected onto the water pump exit, theres not enough space to clamp it and when I do try it's impossible to get clamped any more. What tool should I use??
 

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2020 Dodge Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack
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Hey guys
So I had a bad water pump
Replaced it, after maybe 1 or 2 weeks it shows leakage again
Tightened up the bolts and its leaking less now much less
But it's still leaking
Some say my gasket is pinched or I didn't apply any sort of sealant around the gasket

Now what's the solution here?
Remove the water pump again and apply sealant around the gasket or replace gasket and put sealant around it?
I'm fedup of it leaking, what's the use of a new water pump when it leaks again, I'm pretty sure I Installed it incorrectly but the gasket alone should be fine to avoid leaking.

Thanks in advance for any help. Need this solved please. Its the third time it's doing it. 2013 R/T.
While I might be repeating some of what others have offered...

Assuming the water pump leak is not from the weep hole or from the shaft/seal area but from the gasket or bolts...

It is critical to a good water pump replacement that the pump gasket surface and the gasket surface on the engine are clean and free of any nicks. The block surface is less likely to get a nick -- unless you are clumsy with a scraper when removing the old water pump gasket. The water pump can get a small nick or dent possibly during manufacturing or packaging/boxing or even mishandling by you.

Regardless both surfaces want to be clean and free of any nick, scratch, dent, or ding anything that causes either surface to not be smooth as it left the factory.

I kept a small round sharpening stone in my tool box that I could use to after dousing it with clean oil to use on the clean surface of the block and the water pump to removing any nicks or dings/dents (anything that caused the metal of the surface to manifest a bump even a small bump.

Afterwards thoroughly clean the surfaces with a residue free cleaner.

I would check the bolt hole threads either just blowing them out with compressed air and using a non residue cleaner or if I felt it necessary to run a bottom tap into the hole to ensure the threads were clean. One is not after cutting the threads any deeper in the hole just ensuring the threads are clean and not burred or whatever all the way down. One should be able to feel the difference between the tap just "cutting" through some goop or other stuff on the threads and when the tap actually starts to bite into virgin metal.

You should always when replacing the water pump use new and factory bolts.

In some cases some bolts might extend through the block and maybe into the coolant passage. The factory may offer bolts that have some special thread treatment/coating to seal the threads (this can be called micro-encapsulation) when the bolt is installed and torqued down. This releases the sealant. These bolts are not to be reused.

Always use a new gasket.

I'm of two minds regarding using any extra sealant. If the factory manual calls for a sealant then use it. If not...Really the gasket should provide a proper seal. In the case of a cast iron block and an aluminum water pump housing the two metals expand at different rates. While some extra sealant may work for a while over time the gasket is all there is and if it doesn't seal the sealant is of no help.

The bolts in the picture are clearly of two different lengths and you should have no trouble knowing which bolt goes into which hole.

But in other cases the bolts can be of several different lengths and the length differences may not be that much to the untrained/inexperienced eye. Some automakers spec bolts that are of odd lengths the length is just the right length for the job and for the depth of the hole into which it threads into. This is a cost savings move.

I seem to recall one water pump job I did for a car I can no longer recall almost every bolt was of a different length. I had a piece of cardboard with holes in it and numbered and as I took the water pump bolts out I put the bolt in the right hole in the cardboard. Then when it came time to reassemble I made sure the new bolt length matched the length of the bolt that came out of the hole.

It is important to follow the factory guidelines regarding the order and steps the bolts are to be tightened/torqued down. Generally -- but I refer you to the factory manual -- generally a water pump with a rather circular housing gets tightened down in a star pattern. An elongated water pump housing the tightening starts in the center and works towards the ends.

It is imperative the right bolt go in the right hole. The holes are almost certainly just deep enough for the right bolt. If you put a too long a bolt -- even too long by a fraction of an inch -- it bottoms in the hole. The bolt "feels" tight and will make the torque wrench click but it is not applying full clamping pressure to the water pump housing. What is worse upon bottoming in the hole and during the subsequent tightening the bolt may crack the block. Then even if the right bolt is used the crack may be the source of a leak and one that is hard to diagnose.

Another self inflicted problem can be the overuse of any thread lube, grease for instance. It is possible a very light coating can be called for. But if the stuff is just slathered on the bolt and especially if this was done the previous water pump job and you failed to clean out the bolt holes the bottom of the hole can be full of old grease and the extra grease causes the bolt to bind as it can't compress the old/new grease mess at the bottom the hole. This can result in a bolt that doesn't exert the correct amount of clamping force or worse causes the hole to crack.

I notice a housing has an o-ring. The o-ring must be free of any damage and clean clean clean.

After you have the water pump and new T-stat (always replace the T-stat when replacing a water pump) installed as you go to reconnect each hose check the edge of the hose for any loose flap of hose material. What can happen is as the hose is connected this flap catches and bend back. The hose clamp is installed and tightened. The hose is leak free for a while but after some use and fully hot and under pressure from hot coolant especially if the engine was shut off while the radiator fans were still running due to the elevated coolant temperature the hose can leak.

If you find a loose flap of rubber you have to be sure you install the hose so this flap doesn't get bent back or replace the hose.

Once all hoses are attached and tightened down -- do not over tighten! -- then you must refill the cooling system with the proper ratio of the correct anti-freeze and distilled water. I always used the water pump replacement as the time to replace the old coolant with fresh coolant.

It is important the system be refilled with no air pockets. How to go about this is a whole 'nother thread. Once the system is believed to be filled and the engine run to and the coolant gets hot then is allowed to cool down the level must be checked and if necessary topped up. Of course the system is checked for any leak sign. A sign there is a leak is if you detect the odor of anti-freeze from the hot engine. (If while adding coolant to the cooling system and you spill any this must be rinsed away so you don't smell this and suspect a leak..

Not sure where this belongs but if you have to remove the water pump my recommendation would be to not reuse the gasket even though it is "new" but to replace with a brand new one.
 

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the RULE to follow put bolts in new water pump as u remove them, THEN when the pump is OUT put them in the same hole U stuck them in the new pump, install pump take one out of the old pump put proper hole.


Doin that for 40 years...………..it is fool proof
 

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the RULE to follow put bolts in new water pump as u remove them, THEN when the pump is OUT put them in the same hole U stuck them in the new pump, install pump take one out of the old pump put proper hole.


Doin that for 40 years...………..it is fool proof
In some cases yes. When tearing down an engine the replacement parts may not be present. There is an incentive to wait until one knows what he needs: water pump, T-stat, oil pump, carb rebuild kit, gasket sets, new distributor drive (or a new distributor, and so on. By then ordering these all at once along with maybe oversize pistons, rings, new bearings, valve hardware, etc., one can get a substantial discount.
 

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In some cases yes. When tearing down an engine the replacement parts may not be present. There is an incentive to wait until one knows what he needs: water pump, T-stat, oil pump, carb rebuild kit, gasket sets, new distributor drive (or a new distributor, and so on. By then ordering these all at once along with maybe oversize pistons, rings, new bearings, valve hardware, etc., one can get a substantial discount.

read AGAIN, WHEN changing a water pump this the rule, not a option. Go change a ford water pump then post back.

Good God, pump is bad buy it up front, then change it.

U probly pull ALL the plug wires then freak how to put them back in the right spot...………..

Thanks for dissin my proven method, guess me doing it wrong for years...……...
 

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read AGAIN, WHEN changing a water pump this the rule, not a option. Go change a ford water pump then post back.

Good God, pump is bad buy it up front, then change it.

U probly pull ALL the plug wires then freak how to put them back in the right spot...………..

Thanks for dissin my proven method, guess me doing it wrong for years...……...
As I mentioned in some cases while one is going to replace the pump other things will need replacing too but one won't know what until the engine is ready to assemble. Why run to the auto parts store for a water pump and T-stat then have to make a return trip for the other things?

I had a pretty good relationship with my local auto parts store and with my "big" orders I got a nice discount so rather than just piece mealing my parts ordering I'd make a list.

'course, in some cases I knew the water pump was bad and of course I'd buy that and the T-stat and whatever else (antifreeze) I would need to do the job.

Not dissin your method just pointing out there are different but just as valid ways to do something.

If one has some experience he can if he wants cut corners but for the person who may change a water pump every couple of years (or even less often) better to be extra careful to avoid a possible screw up.

My goal was not to break a time record but to do the job once and right. Bad enough to screw up on my vehicles but screw up a family member's car or a friend's car? No way!

If my methods are a bit more time consuming that was not a problem. I was not a professional mechanic having to make or beat shop time.

In one water pump change -- maybe my sister's Ford -- God I can't recall the model now -- I can recall just tossng the bolts in a can then when it came time to install the water pump threading the bolts in the block holes and determining which bolt went where before installing the water pump.

But I was working on cars almost every night.
 
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