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Greetings,

I bought a 2015 challenger scat pack with 48k miles on it. Should i be looking forward to having/needing suspension/drivetrain work done on it? I know next to nothing about the longevity of these cars. All i know is it put a smile on my face that hasn't left yet. :)

Z
 

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Keep the oil changed. I would suggest a catch can. Clean up your motor. Use the good stuff. Perhaps some throttle body cleaner to undue some of the damage. The can will do the rest. HAVE FUN!!!
 

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2020 Dodge Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack
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Greetings,

I bought a 2015 challenger scat pack with 48k miles on it. Should i be looking forward to having/needing suspension/drivetrain work done on it? I know next to nothing about the longevity of these cars. All i know is it put a smile on my face that hasn't left yet. :)

Z
Unless a shock shows a leak or a tire or tires manifest abnormal tire wear associated with a bad shock or the car manifests signs of a shock problem -- porpoising or a wheel bouncing up and down -- this condition you can not see from inside the car, althought you might feel it, or if it is suspected have someone follow you down a stretch of road and note if any wheel appears to behave like you are driving it over a string of railroad ties -- these generally can last a long time. One of my previous cars went 317K miles with no need of any steering/suspension work. Wait, I just remembered: With the 317K mile car the tech did report once at least one front swap bar drop link dust boot was shot so I had him replace both front sway bar drop links.

In fact with all my cars I think only once did I have to do something shock related. With one car I think a strut developed a leak and I took the struts apart and rather trying to rebuild the struts I installed a shock cartridge that was made to fit in the strut tube.

What I do is when it comes time to replace tires the tech and I -- I can do this myself but I like the tech's input -- review the tire wear and if there is any reason to suspect the alignment then I have the alignment done. At this time the tech will have a chance to check the suspension and steering hardware and he will advise me should he spot anything, excessive bushing play, bushings showing signs of failing, dust boots cracked/split/missing, or he has a problem while trying to dial in the car's alignment.

Might mention I am very careful with my cars. I do not pull in to a parking lot so far as to hit the curb with any tire. I use the mirror bottoms to help me "sight" or position the car so I can pull into a parking space and get up close but avoid having the nose of the car contact the curb. (While the Hellcat's nose is low it is not as low as those of my previous cars. One of these had an air dam that hung down real low and if it hit a curb would break and it cost $400 to replace. Still I like to park the HC so the nose is just up to the curb.)

Likewise when I turn into and out of a drive I am very careful to avoid cutting the corner and driving over a portion of the curb.

Being careful parking the car and being careful when pulling into or out of driveways helps keep the car's alignment in good condition so I can drive over 100K miles (probably more) between alignments.
 

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These models (SP) have limited slip differentials -

For the M6 (manual) and differential - service the lubricants at 48K intervals.

On the A8 - I'd recommend max interval of 50K for for fluid / filter - it will cost some $$ for that, but cheap insurance. The "sealed for life" thing is fine until you have to cough up $$$$ for a new tranny.

And engine air filter every 30K and cabin filter every 24K

Your owner's manual will detail out the intervals - these are the main items to keep in mind for
 

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"On the A8 - I'd recommend max interval of 50K for for fluid / filter - it will cost some $$ for that, but cheap insurance. The "sealed for life" thing is fine until you have to cough up $$$$ for a new tranny."

Hal- I was thinking about 50,000 interval for my trans fluid also. On my LT1 I usually drain the pan once per year, about 12,000 miles, then next year drain the trans and drop the pan to changer the filter also. I have the original trans with no service and 291,000 miles, so I must be doing something right.

I just had the R/T in for the alternator recall & replacement, and I asked the mechanic about changing the trans fluid. He said 60,000 miles. I asked him if that is something I could do myself, and he said the level is critical, not too much, not to little, they use a sensor, so I assume temperature is important also when filling?

Another thing before it slips my mind, the drain pan has no drain plug. There is supposedly a Mercedes drain pan with drain plug that would fit my 5-speed trans, but it's plastic. Would that make a difference to trans performance compared to the stock metal pan that could retain more heat possibly?
 

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2020 Dodge Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack
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"On the A8 - I'd recommend max interval of 50K for for fluid / filter - it will cost some $$ for that, but cheap insurance. The "sealed for life" thing is fine until you have to cough up $$$$ for a new tranny."

Hal- I was thinking about 50,000 interval for my trans fluid also. On my LT1 I usually drain the pan once per year, about 12,000 miles, then next year drain the trans and drop the pan to changer the filter also. I have the original trans with no service and 291,000 miles, so I must be doing something right.

I just had the R/T in for the alternator recall & replacement, and I asked the mechanic about changing the trans fluid. He said 60,000 miles. I asked him if that is something I could do myself, and he said the level is critical, not too much, not to little, they use a sensor, so I assume temperature is important also when filling?

Another thing before it slips my mind, the drain pan has no drain plug. There is supposedly a Mercedes drain pan with drain plug that would fit my 5-speed trans, but it's plastic. Would that make a difference to trans performance compared to the stock metal pan that could retain more heat possibly?
With other car brands my 2nd hand experience is temperature plays a role in ensuring the automatic transmission fluid level is correct. Based on what the tech told you I'd say your car's automatic transmission is probably in the same boat.

As for the question about the plastic drain pan with the drain plug the chances are the M-B transmission fitted with the plastic drain pan is in a car that is comparable to your car and the loads/heat and what have you it subjects the transmission to and apparently this is not an issue with the transmission in the M-B. No guarantees but I believe switching over to the plastic drain pan would not result in any issues.

You want to be careful that the change in pans doesn't result in a change in fluid volume. If it results in a smaller volume of fluid that could be an issue. If the pan change results in an increase in fluid volume it is important the transmission get filled to the correct level. During refilling the fluid level needs to be checked to ensure the level is correct rather than just dumping in so much fluid and calling the transmission "full".
 
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