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Discussion Starter #1
seen a post about how long your battery was or had lasted.

mine is the original 09 factory one.. probably needs replaced this yr.. just curious what brand everyone has used and does one particular one FIT better than the other.

also i havn't looked close yet is there some sort of vent tube attached?

chris
 

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All Challengers have vented batteries because they are located in the trunk. Here are the instructions to replace your battery. A new one can cost $188 or more. I checked around and found that the best buy is a battery made by Johnson Controls, EverStart Maxx (H-7), and sold by Walmart. It has 790 CCA, a 5-year warranty, and sells for only $139.

Walmart.com - Battery Center

Here's how to do it:

Required Tools

10mm Wrench
10mm Socket Wrench with Extension

Parts List

Vented, Top-Post Battery
Anti-Corrosion Fiber Washers
Battery Terminal Protector
Battery Replacement Instructions

1. Open the trunk and lift the base to expose the spare tire and battery compartment.
2. Remove the spare tire to gain additional battery access for safety.
3. Use the 10mm wrench to loosen the connector from the negative terminal. Carefully remove the cable from the battery terminal and set it aside where it cannot reconnect with the battery.
4. Repeat step 4 with the connector on the positive terminal.
5. Remove the vent tube from the hole by the positive terminal.
6. Using the 10mm socket wrench with extension, remove the battery hold-down plate, followed by removal of the tie-strap.
7. Being careful to avoid connecting or otherwise grounding thebattery terminals, as well as to avoid any leaked battery acid or other chemicals, remove the original battery from the vehicle and dispose of it according to your local regulations.
8. Use the plug provided with the battery (ours was attached to the positive-terminal cover) to close the vent port by the negative terminal, which should be farthest from the Challenger vent tube. For safety, be sure to leave all terminal covers on the battery until ready to connect the terminals.
9. Carefully place the new batter in the Challenger battery compartment, being careful to slide the base under the lip on thebattery stand.
10. Secure the battery using the hold-down plate and tie strap.
11. Connect the vent tube to the unplugged battery vent port on the positive end of the battery. There should be a 90* elbow connector (black plastic) that is connected to a rubber hose that passes through the floor of the trunk, to the outside...this vents the hydrogen gas out of the trunk/ interior. Push the positive cable away from the battery to get some access to push the 90* elbow connector back into the vent port. The other end of the hose passes through the battery tray and through a rubber grommet in the floor of the trunk (to outside of the body).
You don't want hydrogen gas / sulfuric acid fumes building up inside the car.
12. Remove the
positive terminal cover, install the positive anti-corrosion fiber washer (if desired), and connect the positive (should be red) battery cables, securing the connector with the 10mm wrench.
13. Remove the negative terminal cover, install the negative anti-corrosion fiber wash (if desired), and connect the negative (should be black) battery cable, securing the connector with the 10mm wrench.
14. If desired, spray battery terminal protector in accordance with the manufacturer’s directions – avoid inhalation and over-spray.
15. Replace the original red terminal cover over the positive terminal. If this does not fit, an appropriate after-market cover is recommended for safety.
 

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Because a battery has this name or that name doesn't mean it was not made in the same plant, only 3 battery companies in the world
Luke
 

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My experience with Chrysler batteries is excellent. Three vehicles since 1992 covering 14 years and have yet to replace one.Unlike the Delcos that seemed to last a year or so.The one in my 92 Cherokee was six years old and had 93,000 miles on it.Funny thing was that it had no markings on it so I had no idea what brand it was.My Challenger battery is three+ years old and shows no signs of weakening.
 

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I replaced both my batteries last year. For my car I went with the Mopar replacement even though it has a white case. Didn't matter to me as it's in the trunk out of site. Couldn't live with that in in my Jeep though where it's under the hood. Black Jeep/white battery case, no way. I got one from Canadian Tire for $60 less with a 4 year full replacement warranty with higher cranking amps etc. Both the Mopar and the Canadian Tire batteries are made by Exide BTW.

Bernie
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ok so there are only certain batteries with this vent tube i take it. What about a battery like optima? would they work or can you get it to work. Just want to get a good one

sent from mobile device
 

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Optima's are great batteries. But you have to understand that they are not a gel or standard flooded battery, they are Absorbed Gas Mat.
When an AGM (dry cell/Optima) battery's voltage drops below 10.5 volts, it discharges, and an older normal charger won't get it back up to par like a normal battery. You have to have either a special charger for the AGM battery, or you have to charge it with your normal charger by charging a regular battery, and running jumper cables from the regular battery being charged over to the AGM battery. Cheap trickle chargers may not work on this battery either.

Most newer high quality chargers will charge this battery. I have never had to replace a yellow top or Blue top Optima and I have used them up to 5-6 years, selling the car they were in before any failure.

Most negative comments about Optima batteries are from people who are uneducated on the product. People in the know, don't have much to complain about.

That being said, there are a few high quality batteries out there, buy what you feel comfortable with.
 

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From the Optima site:
" Alternators are NOT chargers. Don't rely on your alternator to do the work of a charger. If your battery is discharged to the point where it cannot start your vehicle, use a charger as soon as possible to make sure your battery gets fully charged.
An alternator is meant to maintain a battery, not charge it.
Batteries eventually die. Batteries are a consumable product. No battery will last forever. The goal is to consistently maintain your battery to get the most life out of it.
Different chargers. Different capabilities. Under normal conditions most 12 Volt automatic battery chargers will work on an AGM battery. Many newer battery chargers have settings specifically for AGM batteries; some even have separate settings for OPTIMA REDTOP® and YELLOWTOP® batteries, like the OPTIMA® Chargers Digital 1200 12V Performance Battery Charger and Maintainer.
AGM and gel technology differ. Remember that the technology of an AGM battery is not the same as a gel battery, which has its own charging requirements. If your charger offers different modes, select the correct one for your battery. If you use the gel setting to charge an AGM battery, it won't fully charge and, over time, it will actually damage your AGM battery.
Under normal starting conditions, an OPTIMA battery should never experience "at-rest" voltages below 12 volts. Most 12 volt chargers and alternators have no problem recharging an OPTIMA if it has an "at-rest" voltage of 10.5 volts or greater.
The magic threshold – 10.5 volts. The charging scenario for a deeply discharged AGM battery, one that's dipped below 10.5 volts, may be slightly different. The OPTIMA Digital 1200 can charge batteries discharged to only 1.5 volts! For other chargers tips for recovering a deeply discharged AGM battery can be found in OPTIMA's tech tip, How to Resuscitate a Deeply Discharged AGM Battery................
 

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Don't throw away a "dead" Optima battery!!! From the Optima site:

Like a ghost story, sometimes the seemingly dead really aren't dead at all. The same may be true for your deeply discharged AGM battery.
In time, AGM batteries, including OPTIMA® batteries, may fail. Typically, failures are often caused when a starting battery is used in a cycling application, for which a deep-cycle battery is the better choice.
OK, so you have a seemingly bad AGM battery, you attach it to your charger and…CLICK. The charger won't even charge it! "It must be a bad battery!" you exclaim. Or is it? In many cases, OPTIMA batteries that are assumed to be bad may actually be perfectly fine, just deeply discharged.
The great thing about AGM batteries, including OPTIMA REDTOP® and YELLOWTOP® batteries, is that they have incredibly low internal resistance. This allows very high amperage output allowing the battery to power your accessories longer and deeper than a traditional battery, but at the same time deeply discharging it.
An AGM battery with its low internal resistance may stump car guys because sometimes it doesn't work like a traditional flooded lead-acid battery.
Here's the problem: most battery chargers have built-in safety features that may prevent chargers from recharging deeply discharged batteries. A traditional battery that's at 10.5 volts or less is seen as defective, having either a short, a bad cell or some other defect. Most analog chargers are binary and are either on or off. If they don’t come on, it may be because the charger thinks the battery is “bad.” Turning on to charge a “bad” battery could create an unsafe scenario. But the fact is that the AGM battery may be just fine; it has simply slipped below the minimum voltage threshold of the charger to turn on and the charger doesn't know what to do with the battery, so it does nothing.
Here are three options for bringing that deeply discharged AGM battery back to peak operational performance. So grab your jumper cables and charger and…CLEAR!
Recovery Option #1: The Best Solution – AGM-Specific Chargers
The best method for recharging a deeply discharged AGM battery is to purchase a modern charger that has kept up with battery technology. Many chargers now have AGM-specific settings and desulfation steps that help recondition and recover deeply discharged AGM batteries. These are becoming more common, and they work well for all lead-acid batteries. They have the additional capability of doubling as a battery "maintainer" for batteries in storage. Some come with additional ring terminals to permanently attach to your battery leads so you can charge the battery externally with an accessible charger or maintainer. This makes it easy to hook up when you store your car, truck, boat or RV.
The OPTIMA® Chargers Digital 1200 12V Performance Battery Charger and Maintainer enhances the performance of OPTIMA and other AGM batteries, recovers deeply discharged batteries and extends battery life. The OPTIMA® Chargers Digital 1200 12V Performance Battery Charger and Maintainer are optimized when used with high-performance AGM batteries but has enhanced charging capabilities that can also be used with all traditional types of automotive batteries.
This is the preferred method of charging a deeply discharged battery.
Recovery Option #2: The DIY Solution
This is a recovery method for the do-it-yourselfer using the equipment you've got in the garage. With this option, you're going to trick your traditional charger into charging the deeply discharged AGM battery.
Here's what you need:
Battery charger (under 15-amps)
Jumper cables
A good battery, preferably above 12.2 volts. (It can be an AGM or flooded battery, it doesn't matter.)
The seemingly dead, deeply discharged AGM battery
A voltage meter
A watch or timer
Now, here's what you do:
Hook up the good battery and deeply discharged AGM battery in parallel – positive to positive and negative to negative. Do not have the charger connected to the battery or turned on at this stage.
Now, hook up the good battery to the charger. Turn on the charger. The charger will "see" the voltage of the good battery (hooked up in parallel), and start providing a charge.
After the batteries have been hooked up for about an hour, check to see if the AGM battery is slightly warm or hot to the touch. Batteries naturally become warm during charging, but excessive heat may be an indication that there really is something wrong with the battery. Discontinue charging immediately if the battery is hot to the touch. Also discontinue the process if you hear the battery "gassing" — a hissing sound coming from the safety valves. If it's hot or gassing, STOP CHARGING IMMEDIATELY!
With your voltage meter, check back often to see if the AGM battery has charged to 10.5 volts or above, this generally takes less than two hours with a 10-amp charger. If it has, disconnect the charger from the wall outlet and remove the good battery from the charger. Now, connect only the deeply discharged AGM battery to the charger. Turn on the charger and continue until the AGM battery reaches a full charge, or until the automatic charger completes the charge process. In most cases, the AGM battery will be recovered.
Recovery Option #3: Enlist the Professionals
If you don't own a battery charger, you don't want to make the investment, or you're not the do-it-yourself kind of person, this is the option for you.
Take the battery to a professional battery specialist who knows AGM technology. Most specialists are willing to provide "charge and check" procedures free or for a small fee. Auto parts stores are typically not capable of accurately determining an AGM battery's condition and many use conductance testers that don't provide correct readings. Battery specialists (like Interstate Batteries and other independent battery distributors) are experts who can help determine if your battery is recoverable or not.
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I have saved several Optima batteries over the years that were presumed dead, by people that knew little or nothing about this battery. Several of these people were mechanics on amateur racing teams!! lol :jester:
 

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Anyone else get the feeling Deathstar works for Optima?…lol. I've never seen such dedication to a battery manufacturer :jawdrop:
 

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At least Deathstar backed up his statement with some solid info instead of posting an opinion as if it was fact as many do.
 

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Well…to be fair…he backed it up with info from the manufacturer's site. Not exactly unbiased. It would be like asking Chrysler for it's unbiased opinion on the Challenger.:indifferent:
 

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Thats true, but the info he copy and pasted did explain why some think that Optimas are junk.

For the record I don't have an Optima battery but I am in the market for one. My Challenger that I bought last year with 5000 miles on it had an AC Delco that just pooped out.
 

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testament

As a testament to "stock " battery- I purchased my R/T "pre owned" - barely, seemed to be a repo 3 months after originally purchased.I bought it 2 years "young" with 3k miles on clock.Had claw marks all over jump start terminal from sitting on lot for 2 years but have never had a starting problem.Now 4 years old -still no issues (it's even been 7 degrees here recently!) and although I drive it 70 miles a day I also play radio 45min to an hour everyday day at lunch without car running! If it dies anytime soon I wouldnt feel like it owed me anything.:icon_smile:
 

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Discussion Starter #17
does the optima have a vent?
 

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Well…to be fair…he backed it up with info from the manufacturer's site. Not exactly unbiased. It would be like asking Chrysler for it's unbiased opinion on the Challenger.:indifferent:
Actually, I have done this myself, several times over the past two decades. I only added the post from the Optima site to show you that I did not make this up. This is common knowledge for anyone that deals with Optimas. If it is not common to you, then you don't really know how to treat these batteries.
 

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does the optima have a vent?
They do not have a vent as they are sealed batteries. Non sealed batteries require a vent. This news may also be available on the Optima site......which means there is at least one member on here that won't believe it to be true! lol :crbaby:
 

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At least Deathstar backed up his statement with some solid info instead of posting an opinion as if it was fact as many do.
Thanks, I have never once posted my opinion as fact. My posts are based on my personal experience unless otherwise noted. I have learned a lot in the past several decades building cars and racing them. Most of the time I learned from doing something wrong initially! lol :shinner:

Just my attempt to help out people that don't know or have the wrong impression about mods or products.

P.S. I don't work for Optima! :werd:
 
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