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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
A question we get asks a lot.....about tracking on a road course or autox

And not necessarily an easy one to answer, but let's discuss some basics.

First, highly recommend joining or at least getting on the mailing list of driving and racing organization like SCCA, NASA Pro Racing, CHIN or other similar groups.

https://www.scca.com/

https://www.nasaproracing.com/

https://chintrackdays.com/

Day one, a good inspection of your vehicle, making sure all operating system, components are up to par, fluid levels are good and clean, fresh. Basic tools like a torque wrench, spare fluids, tire pressure gauge, infrared thermometer, etc

Before you concentrate on improving performance, recommend improving the driver.
Most new vehicles today, Challengers, Chargers or other will offer more performance then the average person can handle, hence highly recommend attending some form of driving school like HPDE or even SCCA Tracknight and take advantage of an instructor.

What ever you though you knew, think again.

Safety, a good helmet, and not a motorcycle helmet. Most tracks will require an up to date SA2015 or better helmet. Most modern performance cars are capable of very high speed in stock condition, recommend some form of seat belt bar with upgraded belts and possibly a head restraint system of some sort, Hans make several affordable restraint systems.

First vehicle modifications we would recommend is replacing the factory brake fluid with a higher temperature rating, something like Wilwood XP600 is a good choice.
Majority of brake failures are related to boiling of the fluid which cause air accumulation and degradation of the fluid.

Tires, and simply cannot say enough about tires, as big and as good as you can afford, any form of road racing, autox etc, requires great tires and if possible best to have a set of dedicated wheels and tires for the track. Aggressive track tires will not last long daily driven on the street.

Then, improve the brakes with high performance brake pads from PowerStop, Wilwood, etc. using your current brake system. Later upgrade to better calipers and rotors.

Next, front and rear strut braces and if in budget subframe connectors.
From there, the sky is the limit......

Very quickly you will find weak points in your vehicle, cooling systems under sustained speeds will quickly become inadequate and will need to be address, better radiators, additional of better fans, oil cooler system, etc

And only when you can drive beyond the capabilities of the vehicle would we recommend more power, only then and never before......

996657
 

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Great advice for anyone thinking about seriously tracking their car.
 
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I feel like it is these kinds of posts that keep people from track racing - and I'm not a fan.

It's like saying answering "what do I need to do to drag race?" with: get some bead lock 15s, get a set of Mickey Thompson drag tires, replace the fronts with skinnies, install a cage, you HAVE to have a diff brace, you must order a helmet and a fire suit, and you have to join the NHRA to get started.

No, all you have to do is go to the drag strip, wait in line for 4 hours, and then hit the skinny pedal for 12s of fun. :p

All you really have to do to track your car is sign up for a track event with a reputable outfit - one that has an instructor program.

No one on their first day is going to be driving hard enough to boil the brakes. My first track day I was about 45s off any respectable lap time. My arm got tired from all the point-bys I had to give. Also, I had an instructor in the passenger seat the entire time making sure I was focused on safe driving and working on technique instead of trying to win an imaginary trophy. Hell, they even loan out helmets (well, the used to before COVID-19, but I don't know what their policy is now).

Go to the track, drive your car! Have fun! You'll probably drive faster on the highway TO the track, than you actually do ON the track on your first day. Just make sure it'll pass tech inspection.

If it turns out it something you like and something you want to do often. Then start looking at reasonable upgrades. Brake fluid is a smart choice. Tires are smart choice. Brake pad upgrades, too. Get used to doing more frequent fluid changes.

Everything you said would be great advice for someone looking to start pushing for better times.
 

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Sorry Goins2754 but if it comes to taking your word for it VS Luke (from Steve White Motors), I think anyone who knows who he is will just ignore your post. 45 seconds off the pace, what were you doing, idling around the track. Faster on the way to the track than on it? I think that puts it all in perspective.
 

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Looks like fun Luke... Sounds like $$$$ but then again I just blew about 8k to try to get from a 13.6 to a 13.0 LOL.
Need some advice though Luke, pros cons of Whipple vs Magnuson. Pros of each, cons of each. OST Dyno showed me a stock 5.7L with one running 11lbs of boost.
 

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Sorry Goins2754 but if it comes to taking your word for it VS Luke (from Steve White Motors), I think anyone who knows who he is will just ignore your post. 45 seconds off the pace, what were you doing, idling around the track. Faster on the way to the track than on it? I think that puts it all in perspective.
That's fine, you do whatever you want with your money. It's your money.

But I raced for two month this year with a bone stock car. A/S tires, no special brake fluid, I didn't even have my own helmet! The outfit I run with loans helmets out to new drivers for their first year. And guess what, I had very few issues. I had brake fade at the end of sessions, but I could feel the pedal getting soft and knew when to take it easier.

Right now, I run with only high-temp brake fluid and PowerStop Track Day pads & rotors. I haven't even replaced my tires yet! OH NO!!!!! I also bought a helmet because the outfit said with COVID, they're not loaning helmets out anymore.

And you're not gonna shame me for being slow on my first day at the track ever. Everyone starts somewhere. There's no shame in that. Now, I run in the intermediate group with no issues and often get people asking me about tracking a Challenger because they're impressed that it can actually do track work. Too many years of people saying "the fat girl can't dance."

But like I said, if you want to drop $5k on upgrades before you even drive to the race track, be my guest. I just think it's bad for the hobby to act like that's what's required to get into track days. It's not. You don't even need a sports car, honestly. I've seen guys having fun in bone stock base Civics, Subaru Crosstreks, and even one guy who brought a Grand Cherokee!

It's like saying in order to be a PC gamer you need an $8k custom built, water-cooled rig with 4 graphics cards and 3 montiors or to get into overlanding requires a $60k Gladiator and a $5k tent with a tow behind camping rig with a portable shower and fold out kitchen. Neither are true. All you need is something basic to get your started and the will to go out and do it.
 

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I'm by no means a professional at the strip, I just like to try to make my car faster and try to get better with a few runs at the strip a year. With that said, I think Luke's comment about inspecting your car and generally taking it seriously cannot be understated. If a car leaks a fluid on the track, there goes at least half an hour while the track staff clean it up and reprep the surfaces. I mean I know these failures can happen in-situ when you're pushing it, but anything you can do to minimize these accidents saves everyone time and yourself money. If something isn't right, don't run it down the track!
 

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It shouldn't have been necessary, but maybe Luke should have titled the thread What do I Need to do, to Track My Car Correctly ;)

A Guy
 

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It shouldn't have been necessary, but maybe Luke should have titled the thread What do I Need to do, to Track My Car Correctly ;)

A Guy
Maybe it should also be noted that Luke isn't talking about drag racing which is a different world entirely. A great example of that was the Demon being barred from the track because it lacked the necessary safety equipment for it's power.
 
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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
I feel like it is these kinds of posts that keep people from track racing - and I'm not a fan.

It's like saying answering "what do I need to do to drag race?" with: get some bead lock 15s, get a set of Mickey Thompson drag tires, replace the fronts with skinnies, install a cage, you HAVE to have a diff brace, you must order a helmet and a fire suit, and you have to join the NHRA to get started.

No, all you have to do is go to the drag strip, wait in line for 4 hours, and then hit the skinny pedal for 12s of fun. :p

All you really have to do to track your car is sign up for a track event with a reputable outfit - one that has an instructor program.

No one on their first day is going to be driving hard enough to boil the brakes. My first track day I was about 45s off any respectable lap time. My arm got tired from all the point-bys I had to give. Also, I had an instructor in the passenger seat the entire time making sure I was focused on safe driving and working on technique instead of trying to win an imaginary trophy. Hell, they even loan out helmets (well, the used to before COVID-19, but I don't know what their policy is now).

Go to the track, drive your car! Have fun! You'll probably drive faster on the highway TO the track, than you actually do ON the track on your first day. Just make sure it'll pass tech inspection.

If it turns out it something you like and something you want to do often. Then start looking at reasonable upgrades. Brake fluid is a smart choice. Tires are smart choice. Brake pad upgrades, too. Get used to doing more frequent fluid changes.

Everything you said would be great advice for someone looking to start pushing for better times.

Don't disagree, but re-read what we posted, its in steps.......first thing good helmet or like you suggest rent or borrow one from the track and do a reputable track event, make sure the car is in tip top shape and as you progress go thru the steps........
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Looks like fun Luke... Sounds like $$$$ but then again I just blew about 8k to try to get from a 13.6 to a 13.0 LOL.
Need some advice though Luke, pros cons of Whipple vs Magnuson. Pros of each, cons of each. OST Dyno showed me a stock 5.7L with one running 11lbs of boost.
depends on what your trying to achieve, the Whipple will deliver more power, less desirable driveability
the Magnuson TVS2300 is an extremely reliable platform, maybe except for belt issues once you go to small pulleys, for a daily driver, sometime track day car, its perfect, good driveability low heat issues etc, its limited to upper 600 whps, at about 11/12 psi it becomes un-efficient and the Whipple will surpass it

the Whipple just like the KB produces a lot of heat, but will make more power without question
 
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depends on what your trying to achieve, the Whipple will deliver more power, less desirable driveability
the Magnuson TVS2300 is an extremely reliable platform, maybe except for belt issues once you go to small pulleys, for a daily driver, sometime track day car, its perfect, good driveability low heat issues etc, its limited to upper 600 whps, at about 11/12 psi it becomes un-efficient and the Whipple will surpass it

the Whipple just like the KB produces a lot of heat, but will make more power without question
Thanks Luke, when I was at OST Dyno, the company doing my cam, I mentioned a magnuson and the installer said that the Whipple makes for power. I was thinking maybe 6 to 8 lbs boost and he fired up a 5.7l running 11 lbs. I have heard, can not recall by whom, that the whipple is harder on the drive line and engine itself. I guess it is a true twin screw which is different (more potent for all out HP) than a Roots but the roots style is more streetable and produces less shock on the drive train. Is this true?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
yes the Whipple is significantly more brutal and much harder on driveline components, max suggested psi on a 5.7 is 8 psi and 6 on a 6.4

of course once bottom end is forged anything goes

a very popular build that we have done many times on a typical 6.4 car, forged short block, Hellcat stock cam, Kooks long tubes and green catted high flow cats, Magnuson TVS2300, 675/680 whps, upgraded fuel system, a lot of fun to drive, very reliable and will as a rule outrun a stock Hellcat.....kind of car, you can drive 5k miles in a week for the Hot Rod Power Tour
 

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a very popular build that we have done many times on a typical 6.4 car, forged short block, Hellcat stock cam, Kooks long tubes and green catted high flow cats, Magnuson TVS2300, 675/680 whps, upgraded fuel system, a lot of fun to drive, very reliable and will as a rule outrun a stock Hellcat.....kind of car, you can drive 5k miles in a week for the Hot Rod Power Tour
My dream build, while keeping the shaker of course.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
we can do that
 
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