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I personally have hear a lot about the engine, and know a lot about the engine, but would like to know what exactly made is so great.
 

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Like most people, I don't know. But I want one. In a Challenger.
 

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FWIW Allpar has a pretty nice breakdown of the 426.

Because Allpar mentioned the 413 wedge (my brother-in-law had one in a Volare) I looked it up and discovered there was a 426 Max Wedge.
 

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I personally have hear a lot about the engine, and know a lot about the engine, but would like to know what exactly made is so great.
Primarily advertising. And the fact you are talking to a bunch of mainly Dodge fans. Go to the a Ford or Chevy site and you'll get a different greatest engine candidate.

I will agree with Pioneer4x4 that breathing and strength certainly helped the legend develop. I mean obviously it wasn't a crappy engine.

But the best engines from Dodge now -- the Hellcat/Demon engine -- are not hemi per se. They do not have the hemispherical combustion chamber.
 

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HEMI's are still the basis of all funny car and top fuel engines today. The heads were/are the trick.
If the rumor's are true about the 426 coming back........they would look and run awesome with aluminum "old style" HEMI heads.
 

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A hemispherical cylinder head ("hemi-head") simply allows an engine to make more power. It has an efficient combustion chamber with an excellent surface-to-volume ratio, with minimal heat loss to the head, and allows for two larger valves. Also, the hemi-head design places the spark plug at or near the center of the chamber to promote a strong flame front.

Although all manufacturers were familiar with multi-valve engines and hemispherical combustion chambers, adding more valves per cylinder, or designing the complex valvetrain needed for a hemispherical chamber were expensive ways of improving the high-RPM breathing of production engines. Chrysler solved this problem by canting the angle of the NASCAR-mandated two valves per cylinder, so that significantly larger valves could be used.
 

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Primarily advertising. And the fact you are talking to a bunch of mainly Dodge fans. Go to the a Ford or Chevy site and you'll get a different greatest engine candidate.
Agreed, I know Ford guys who would kill for a Ford 427 "Cammer" motor... Hell, even I would, I could sell it by a 426 Hemi (Gen II Real Hemi) and still have money left over.
 

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I guess the "Hemi" advertising works...I see more guys buying Harbor Freight Hemi 212cc engine (not emissions compliant in some state..cough..cough) vs the Wedge 212cc engine. ;)
 

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There are things that the Gen 1 & 2 Hemi actually aren't all that good at.
Fuel economy, maximum naturally aspirated power, and as-installed in street cars, longevity.

The hemi and cams with large amounts of overlap are not a great combination.

It was marketing and scarcity (supply and demand).
 

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Here an interesting fact. During World War II, Chrysler began testing and developing engines with hemispherical combustion chambers for aeronautical and military purposes. Chrysler worked with Continental to create the 1,792-cubic-inch AV-1790-5B V-12 in the M47 Patton tank. The monster of an engine put out 810 horsepower and 1,560 pound-feet of torque. The 1940s P-47 Republic Thunderbolt fighter plane used another example of the hemi engine. The XIV-2220 V-16 had pushrod-activated valves and a displacement of 2,200 cubic inches, and at 3,400 rpm it produced 2,500 horsepower. The engine also used 58.5-degree separation between the valves.
 

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Here an interesting fact. During World War II, Chrysler began testing and developing engines with hemispherical combustion chambers for aeronautical and military purposes. Chrysler worked with Continental to create the 1,792-cubic-inch AV-1790-5B V-12 in the M47 Patton tank. The monster of an engine put out 810 horsepower and 1,560 pound-feet of torque. The 1940s P-47 Republic Thunderbolt fighter plane used another example of the hemi engine. The XIV-2220 V-16 had pushrod-activated valves and a displacement of 2,200 cubic inches, and at 3,400 rpm it produced 2,500 horsepower. The engine also used 58.5-degree separation between the valves.
Those numbers were on gasoline only. The AVDS 1790 produced 750 H.P. (with slight variations) on diesel (boosted). This latter config was used on the M47, 48, 60, 60A1, 60A2 & 60A3. I served on all of these except the M47 and M60A3. The RISE engine (I believe) maintained the same H.P. rating, but I ETS'ed before that came into service. Gasoline was still being used on some M88 tank recovery vehicles into the '70's.

None of the WWII iterations of the M26 Pershing used the 1790 except the E2 & mainly as a postwar development, all earlier ones used the Ford GAF OHC design. Other WWII U.S. armor used variously the Chrysler A57 multibank flathead, the Ford GAF or the Conti radial engine. The GAF was Fords aircraft V12 design lopped down to a V8 for mainly Sherman use.
 

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Those numbers were on gasoline only. The AVDS 1790 produced 750 H.P. (with slight variations) on diesel (boosted). This latter config was used on the M47, 48, 60, 60A1, 60A2 & 60A3. I served on all of these except the M47 and M60A3. The RISE engine (I believe) maintained the same H.P. rating, but I ETS'ed before that came into service. Gasoline was still being used on some M88 tank recovery vehicles into the '70's.

None of the WWII iterations of the M26 Pershing used the 1790 except the E2 & mainly as a postwar development, all earlier ones used the Ford GAF OHC design. Other WWII U.S. armor used variously the Chrysler A57 multibank flathead, the Ford GAF or the Conti radial engine. The GAF was Fords aircraft V12 design lopped down to a V8 for mainly Sherman use.
I think you sunk my battle ship.
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