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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2009 R/T in the spring I want to add some power and performance. I have 9k-11k to spend what route would you suggest, I will be having someone else do all the install work so take that into account.

1) Heads, cam, headers with 3200 stall and/or 3.55 rear end should be reliable and good overall performance upgrade, solid foundation if more money comes free later on... which is doubtful

2) Drop a complete 392 or larger stroker in, great power performance and a warranty.

3) Supercharger great power performance and more risk of an engine failure.
 

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Supercharging would be the most bang for your buck. As you long as you don't run too many pounds, your engine should be okay.
 
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Supercharger for the most hp for the buck.....stay at 8lbs or less and your stock parts will be fine based on others experience....other good choice is a custom cam, headers, ported TB, heads, high flow cats, high stall converter and DRs for the track.
 

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ok. i can tell you 1st hand i just put a supercharger on my car.. i bought it USED installed it myself. and after all said and done with all the EXTRA stuff ( some needed some by choice ) it was over 8000.

THAT WAS USED!.. so a supercharger new installed ( JUST THE SUPERCHARGER) would be that.. then you have guages.. YOU MUST HAVE a air/fuel guage.. if you don't you are driving a bomb.. you need a boost guage.. a pod to put them in.. that mess is about 600 bucks or more depending on what a/f guage you get.. then there is other stuff. possibly a new strut tower brace ( if you have one now it may not clear ) ect ect..

so i would figure to do a supercharger RIGHT.. 9000 bucks installed. that may be high but you will be covered..

now take in mind that is on a stock block.. no more than 8lbs.. you even then alot of people are saying 8lbs is pushing it.

you could proabably build a motor for 5000 - 6000 that will be n/a and run great..

if you are the type that is a worry wart.. DON'T GET A SUPERCHARGER.. do n/a and call it a day.

just say from my experience

chris
 

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Did you recently purchase this car?
 

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Call Richard Petty's Garage (right there in NC) find out how much to ProCharge your car. I have an '09 R/T 6-speed, ProCharged at 18,000 miles, has 52,000 now. Cost (installed) $7,000. ProCharger does rebates ($500) about twice a year. Guaranteed best bang for the buck. 100+ HP with a safe 6 lbs. of boost, with a good tune. 480 RWHP with STOCK exhaust and no other engine mods.
 

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A lot of it depends on where you live and how you'll drive the car. I assume this will primarily be your street driver. How important is drivability on the street? If you want a monster to scare woman and children with, drivability is not as important, and you live below 2,000 ft. above sea level, I suggest going the stroked N/A route with cam, heads, exhaust, etc. Big displacement and good flow with lots of available air to feed it is a religious experience. If drivability is important and/or you live above 2,000 ft. above sea level go the centrifugal supercharger route. I live at 4,500 ft so I needed to create my own atmosphere and went forced induction. Boost comes on at around 3,000 rpms so below that it drives like it did before the install. Above 3,000 rpms it turns into Mr. Hyde. The off-the-shelf tunes that come with the superchargers have a large margin of error designed into them to keep your engine safe at 8 lbs. of boost. Mine is approaching 20k trouble free miles since the S/C install. Some on this forum are well over 50K. You can get custom tunes that make more power and many of those have proved very reliable but you do need to make sure you use an experienced tuner who knows what they are doing. However, don't get seduced by big peak hp numbers alone. You want usable power in a usable power range that your car can actually put to the pavement. You want balance between handling and power so you can actually use the power your car makes. Tires will be a big issue for you. Can you afford to replace expensive performance tires on a regular basis? Hint: the stock tires or their equivalent will not do the job adequately. Can the tires you can afford actually handle the kind of power you'll be making? Do you merely want to win burn out contests or do you actually want get your car to hook up and use all that power to perform well? These are important considerations in planning your build.
 
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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the reply, I'm looking at the big picture and want reliability, drivability, and the best overall performance with the budget I have available. I've had a few brief discussions with forum vendors, but I'm no closer to making a final decision. I haven't really discussed centrifugal superchargers, because I prefer the look of the Maggie. Do you ever have to worry about staying out of part throttle boost on your Vortech?

I could have misread your post but were you saying N/A would offer less drivability? I would have thought that was the best option for both reliabilty and drivability...
 

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Do you ever have to worry about staying out of part throttle boost on your Vortech?
No, not really. You develop a pretty good feel for the sweet spots where boost comes on and can control it with engine speed and throttle. With a manual it's pretty easy to control rpms so you can either avoid boost all together or have it right on the verge where a slight tap of the throttle brings instant insanity.

I could have misread your post but were you saying N/A would offer less drivability? I would have thought that was the best option for both reliabilty and drivability...
Driveability and reliability will depend on how far you go in building a N/A beast. A serious bored and stroked N/A engine with heads, cam, etc. will tend to be more on the radical side. It can be temperamental and quirky. It may have cooling problems, vibrations, noise and reliability issues from pushing the envelope. Some people don't like to deal with that in a daily driver. I personally think that is part of the fun of hot rodding and really enjoy it. But, it might not make for a good, reliable driver to get you back to and forth to work, haul family around or to take your wife on a cross country road trip. It gets back to where you live and how you'll drive the car. It's important stuff to consider in the larger picture.
 
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