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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I know oils (like catch cans) is a topic that's been beaten to death, but I wondered what you 5.7 guys are using for the most part. I have a 2018 R/T 5.7, and the book says the car takes regular fossil oil so I assume that fossil oil is the factory fill. The book also says synthetics may be used as long as the viscosity is correct and MS-6395 spec is met. I just did my first oil change at 1K and went with Pennzoil Platinum Ultra 5W-20 and MO-899 filter. But I've since read that cars that come from the factory with fossil oils should be driven at least 4K on that oil to ensure ring seating and such. However, I suspect that applies more to engines from at least 20 years ago and not as much to today's engines. What's your guys' take on this thinking these days? Is using synthetics this early on the 5.7 preventing proper engine burn-in? My dearly departed 2015 Scat Pack clearly came from the factory with 0W-40 synthetic, as do so many cars today with factory-fill oil so I'm thinking NBD with my 5.7. The MS-6395 spec probably isn't as stringent as the MS-12633 spec that the bigger Hemis need, so dino oil is fine. I didn't select Mobil1 only because it isn't certified to the 6395 spec for warranty reasons...although it's a fine oil, and was good enough on the 6.1 and 6.4 until 2012 or so...go figure. Politics between FCA and the oil companies, I would guess.

As a side note, I was surprised to find the tiny MO-339 filter on the 5.7 and not the MO-899 that my Scat Pack and 2014 R/T 5.7 had from the factory. From what I can tell, it was simply an economization effort from FCA to have all 5.7's using the same filter since the Ram's need the smaller one because of the electric steering that was new for 2014 (or so). The 899 fit just fine, so that's what's on there and what I'll probably use going forward.

Thanks!
 

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I know oils (like catch cans) is a topic that's been beaten to death, but I wondered what you 5.7 guys are using for the most part. I have a 2018 R/T 5.7, and the book says the car takes regular fossil oil so I assume that fossil oil is the factory fill. The book also says synthetics may be used as long as the viscosity is correct and MS-6395 spec is met. I just did my first oil change at 1K and went with Pennzoil Platinum Ultra 5W-20 and MO-899 filter. But I've since read that cars that come from the factory with fossil oils should be driven at least 4K on that oil to ensure ring seating and such. However, I suspect that applies more to engines from at least 20 years ago and not as much to today's engines. What's your guys' take on this thinking these days? Is using synthetics this early on the 5.7 preventing proper engine burn-in? My dearly departed 2015 Scat Pack clearly came from the factory with 0W-40 synthetic, as do so many cars today with factory-fill oil so I'm thinking NBD with my 5.7. The MS-6395 spec probably isn't as stringent as the MS-12633 spec that the bigger Hemi's need, so dino oil is fine. I didn't select Mobil1 only because it isn't certified to the 6395 spec for warranty reasons...although it's a fine oil, and was good enough on the 6.1 and 6.4 until 2012 or so go figure. Politics between FCA and the oil companies, I would guess.

As a side note, I was surprised to find the tiny MO-339 filter on the 5.7 and not the MO-899 that my Scat Pack and 2014 R/T 5.7 had from the factory. From what I can tell, it was simply an economization effort from FCA to have all 5.7's using the same filter since the Ram's need the smaller one because of the electric steering that was new for 2014 (or so). The 899 fit just fine, so that's what's on there and what I'll probably use going forward.

Thanks!
From years ago the rumor was synthetic oils were too "slick" to let the engine break in properly. The rings would not seat but instead glaze the cylinders and once glazed the cylinders and rings would never seal properly.

I can't say this is the case with all engines but the half dozen rebuilt engines I've been around and the few I've done on my own the rings seat PDQ. One primes the engine's oil system them fires the engine up. The engine initially runs pretty crummy and smokes. Some of this is from the assembly lube burning off various surfaces. Engine RPMs are elevated to ensure proper oil supply to the cam/lifters -- which are generally treated to a generous application of special "grease" recommended by the cam maker -- and the engine run for 15 or so minutes. As the engine runs one can see and hear the rings seat. The exhaust stops smoking, the engine smooths out and just sounds better. It is a rather remarkable transformation.

The cylinder wall finish -- coarse cross hatch from honing -- really helps the rings seat. At the end of the initial run in the oil is drained and replaced with fresh oil that the engine will use going forward. The filter is replaced and the car is then driven and break in finishes over the next couple of thousand miles.

Best advice I can offer is follow the user's manual regarding what oil to use and when to replace it. If the manual allows for the use of synthetic oil my advice is to use synthetic oil. Its superior properties make for a superior lubricant.

All I dare offer besides this is if you want to change the oil more often do so. You want to change the oil before it gets too contaminated with combustion by-products that can affect the oil's ability to protect the engine under extreme conditions.

Considering how in most cases modern engines produce more power/torque for a given amount of displacement compared to older engines and how most studies have passenger vehicles spending more time in traffic -- more idling time -- I dare say all conditions are extreme.

If you track the car always show up at the track event with fresh oil in the engine.

While the filter appears small if you cut one apart and spread out, unroll the filter element you'll find it has considerable surface area. Once past break in and as long as the engine air filter is intact the engine oil filter has little to do. If the small filter bothers you replace the filter between oil changes. Just remove the old filter and after a bit of drain time wipe where the filter seats/seals. Fill the new filter with fresh oil, smear a bit of this fresh oil on the seal then install and properly tighten the new filter.
 

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For all three of our 5.7's that were bought new, I changed to full synthetic at about 1,500 miles.

For the '07 Charger R/T and the '13 Charger R/T that we had, I switched to Mobil 1 5W-20. Same for the '11 Challenger R/T Classic that I bought used at about 12,000 miles.

For our '17 Durango R/T, I switched to Pennzoil Ultra Synthetic 5W-20 only to avoid any possible warranty issue since the Mobil 1 Full Synthetic doesn't meet FCA's (marketing dollar) standard.

By the way, the oil pan and oil filter adapter are quite different on the Durango than what was on either of my Chargers or my '11 Challenger R/T. The filter is a bit of a PITA to access.
 

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At my first oil change, about 3000 miles, I went with the Pennzoil Ultra Platinum Synthetic and the MO-041 (PN 05038041AA) SRT oil filter and just repeat that every 6000 miles.
 

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I have a 2018 R/T 5.7, and the book says the car takes regular fossil oil so I assume that fossil oil is the factory fill. The book also says synthetics may be used as long as the viscosity is correct and MS-6395 spec is met.

I just did my first oil change at 1K and went with Pennzoil Platinum Ultra 5W-20 and MO-899 filter. But I've since read that cars that come from the factory with fossil oils should be driven at least 4K on that oil to ensure ring seating and such. However, I suspect that applies more to engines from at least 20 years ago and not as much to today's engines. What's your guys' take on this thinking these days? Is using synthetics this early on the 5.7 preventing proper engine burn-in? My dearly departed 2015 Scat Pack clearly came from the factory with 0W-40 synthetic, as do so many cars today with factory-fill oil so I'm thinking NBD with my 5.7. The MS-6395 spec probably isn't as stringent as the MS-12633 spec that the bigger Hemi's need, so dino oil is fine. I didn't select Mobil1 only because it isn't certified to the 6395 spec for warranty reasons...
Considering the 5.7 and 6.4 use the same rings, cam suppliers and bearing suppliers - the SRT engines break in fine with syn oils. They have syn oil from day one.

Many manufacturers - Mercedes, Honda, Porsche, Corvette have been using synthetics as factory fill since the late 90s.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks, guys...great info. I also believe some of the thinking about not switching to synthetics too early is a holdover from the days of when actual "break-in" oil or mineral oil was used early in the engine's life. And then there are people who are afraid to switch to synthetics from dino oil engines because it used to cause older seal materials to swell and cause leaks. I'm not convinced either of these issues are relevant to newer engines, and that synthetics can be used on any modern engine if the owner is willing to pay a little more per quart. The benefits I think are worth it. My wife has a new Journey with a 3.6, and she just turned 1K miles also...that will get synthetic also next weekend. I was at Autozone recently, and it seems to be getting harder to find dino oil anyway...at least 80% of what they had was synth blend or full synth. Finally, I'm putting a BT catch can on my new baby shortly...it's the very same can I bought for my '09 300C SRT8 and have used it on my 2014 R/T 5.7 and 2015 Scat Pack. I've decided to leave the full engine cover and factory intake with silencer in place, so I bought a fender mount for this time around (used a Charger intake and front bolt-mount location for my 2014). Cheers! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
When to switch from Regular to Synthetic on 5.7 ???? As soon as you're ready to say goodbye to the Hemi Tick. :|
Believe it or not, that was my main reason for switching to synth at 1K...car runs super-quiet so far and I wanted to do what I can to keep it that way. My 2014 5.7 was a ticker and drove me nuts...sounded like it was coming through the passenger side firewall and I just became fixated on it. I never took it to the dealer to have it checked out. I was on the fence about getting another 5.7 because of this, but absolutely no regrets! Also, I thought I'd regret the downgrade in power after three years with my 2015 Scat Pack but between the A8, active exhaust and Super Track Pak it's a wonderful daily driver. The car feels like it has nothing in common at all with my 2014 (which had an A5 and no STP)!
 
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I noticed mine get quieter and quieter after the switch to full synthetic.... In may case I swithched to Mobil-1 (05W-20) around 2K miles (give or take) with Mopar #899 filter. I've used Mobil-1 in all our vehicles since the late 1980s/early 1990s and have been very happy with it. There's lot's of ZDDP in their 15W-50 which I use in my old '66 327ci/350hp Chevy Corvette that I've owned since 1988. :|
 

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Been using Mobile 1 5w20 full synthetic since day 1 no issues, 2016 RT M6. Hemi tick is stil there, although not too loud
 

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I switched to Synthetic early on when I had my 5.7.


The engine was quieter with Castrol Syntec than other synthetics, including Mobil 1. Also used the SRT filter on mine.
 

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My 2010 has had synthetic oil changes its entire life, and its at 89k miles now with no problems other than my hurst shifter snapping entirely... Just changed the oil and I was looking into using an additive in my car, archoil 9100 that I bought for my old diesel truck. It does wonders on old direct injection diesels, smoother start ups, healthier injectors etc. Anyone every try running it in their 5.7 hemi?
 

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Since my very first oil change at 1.5K miles, I have been using Royal Purple full synthetic with the SRT filter. This combo is pricey but I only change the oil once a year. Nothing but the best for my baby. RP is the first oil where I can still see through the stream as it drains. No blackness, just a purple tinge.
 

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Since my very first oil change at 1.5K miles, I have been using Royal Purple full synthetic with the SRT filter. This combo is pricey but I only change the oil once a year. Nothing but the best for my baby. RP is the first oil where I can still see through the stream as it drains. No blackness, just a purple tinge.
A number of times I have changed the Mobil 1 oil in one of my cars: 2006 GTO, Boxster, 996 Turbo; then driven 5K miles -- almost all highway miles -- then upon draining the oil observed the oil still had some amber color to it, was still translucent.

This is not so much due to the quality of the oil -- though I think Mobil 1 oil is pretty darn good oil -- more just highlighting how "easy" highway miles are on engine oil.
 

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Whoops. Put 5k on my new Challenger this summer and never changed the oil. The oil change computer said I was still at 50%!!

I'll give it a full synthetic change first thing in the summer, hopefully no damage was done.

It's good to hear synthetic can help mitigate the tick, which I find annoying.
 

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I have worked on engine oil formulations and base oil technology development for most of my career and I am not impressed with PAO based engine oils. They are fine base oils for engine oil formulations, but modern highly hydroprocessed base oils such as produced by Chevron and others match PAO in all regards except extremely low temperature performance (below -30°F) where PAO will flow slightly quicker during cold starting. But that is it.
The bulk of all 0W-20 and 30 engine oils are produced with what is known as Group III base oils. These are deemed synthetic base oils for marketing purposes and Castrol plus others use them in their "Synthetic" product line. They are lower cost than PAO but perform essentially the same in engine tests. All modern engine oils pass stringent API engine testing protocols and far exceed the level of performance seen in passenger car use under the most stringent conditions. One engine test runs for 100 hours at 300°F oil temperature. Sequence IIIG Test Method This is far more severe than any street engine will ever see and all oils must pass this test and others as well.

Also, Shell is producing what is known as GTL base oils which are synthetic hydrocarbons made from Natural Gas. These base oils actually exceed PAO in many regards including additive solubility and oil dispersancy as well as oxidation stability. Shell uses these base oils in a number of products including their general offering of SAE 0W-20 which is recommended for many HEMI engines.

I would recommend saving the cost of synthetics and use conventional engine oil with normal oil change interval. My 5.7L is running just fine on these oils with zero oil consumption between oil changes. And that is the real measure of oil performance. with modern oils and reasonable oil change intervals, engines will last 200K+ miles as long as nothing physically brakes (valve springs or the like).
 

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I started with Mobile 1 synthetic at 1,000 miles, and later switched to Royal Purple a little later, and always continued. I run a little hotter with Arrington phase 4 heads, 586 cam, and long tube headers. I drive it for fun, and have 109,000 miles. I feel it is very important to use a superior filter like Mobile 1 or Royal Purple, instead or the other "$4.00" filters. 2010 Challenger R/T.
 

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Whoops. Put 5k on my new Challenger this summer and never changed the oil. The oil change computer said I was still at 50%!!

I'll give it a full synthetic change first thing in the summer, hopefully no damage was done.

It's good to hear synthetic can help mitigate the tick, which I find annoying.
If you are putting the car away for the season you really should change the oil *before* you put the car away. The oil in there now is contaminated and has developed some acidic compounds. The only way to deal with those is to drain the oil and replace it.
 
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