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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
New calipers came today for my Rt. They are brembos 6pfront 4 rear. Which brake fluid should I use to flush and fill the system with. Should I upgrade or continue using same fluid. Never track the car. Just my daily driver.
 

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New calipers came today for my Rt. They are brembos 6pfront 4 rear. Which brake fluid should I use to flush and fill the system with. Should I upgrade or continue using same fluid. Never track the car. Just my daily driver.
Use the factory fluid. With no track use -- actually even with some track use -- and a daily driver the factory fluid is quite adequate.

There is no concern about any incompatibility between the fluid that is in the untouched system areas now and what fluid you will be using to flush and then refill/bleed the entire system.

And as the pads/rotors wear and fluid needs to be added you don't have to worry about keeping any special fluid -- unopened -- on hand in the car to use to top up the brake fluid reservoir.
 

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DOT3 is factory fill and DOT4 is "acceptable" per service manuals
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I prefer an upgrade to DOT4. Motul is my fluid of choice but most are good.
Is there anything different about upgrading to dot 4 vs staying with 3 maintenance wise. Why wouldn’t I upgrade.

Use the factory fluid. With no track use -- actually even with some track use -- and a daily driver the factory fluid is quite adequate.

There is no concern about any incompatibility between the fluid that is in the untouched system areas now and what fluid you will be using to flush and then refill/bleed the entire system.

And as the pads/rotors wear and fluid needs to be added you don't have to worry about keeping any special fluid -- unopened -- on hand in the car to use to top up the brake fluid reservoir.
This is it right here correct?
Use the factory fluid. With no track use -- actually even with some track use -- and a daily driver the factory fluid is quite adequate.

There is no concern about any incompatibility between the fluid that is in the untouched system areas now and what fluid you will be using to flush and then refill/bleed the entire system.

And as the pads/rotors wear and fluid needs to be added you don't have to worry about keeping any special fluid -- unopened -- on hand in the car to use to top up the brake fluid reservoir.
this is it right here correct
Liquid Bottle Fluid Automotive tire Paint
 

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DOT 4 requires you to flush it every 2 years, time based because of how hydroscopic it is. If you plan on track use (heating up your fluid with heavy braking) something with a higher boiling point may be appropriate.

Here's a pretty good brake fluid comparison chart
 

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I can also strongly recommend using the power bleeder when flushing your system. Made quick work when soloing the flush by myself.
 

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DOT 4 requires you to flush it every 2 years, time based because of how hydroscopic it is. If you plan on track use (heating up your fluid with heavy braking) something with a higher boiling point may be appropriate.

Here's a pretty good brake fluid comparison chart
Oh wow, I did not realize Castrol React SRF has the highest wet boil temp?
Rectangle Font Parallel Pattern Symmetry
 

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DOT 4 requires you to flush it every 2 years, time based because of how hydroscopic it is. If you plan on track use (heating up your fluid with heavy braking) something with a higher boiling point may be appropriate.

Here's a pretty good brake fluid comparison chart
I've never heard you have to flush DOT 4 every 2 years. However, some manufacturers suggest flushing every 2 years (think most European makes) and some say do it every 3 years (Honda). It is in the owners manual. Most European cars use DOT 4, maybe that's where you get that interval.

Most people never flush the brake fluid. Most never have problems. I recommend flushing every 2-3 years just so there is good fresh fluid in there.
 

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I've never heard you have to flush DOT 4 every 2 years. However, some manufacturers suggest flushing every 2 years (think most European makes) and some say do it every 3 years (Honda). It is in the owners manual. Most European cars use DOT 4, maybe that's where you get that interval.

Most people never flush the brake fluid. Most never have problems. I recommend flushing every 2-3 years just so there is good fresh fluid in there.
even with DOT3 the Euro makes call for every two year fluid service
 

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Is there anything different about upgrading to dot 4 vs staying with 3 maintenance wise. Why wouldn’t I upgrade.


This is it right here correct?

this is it right here correct View attachment 1058592
Never bought brake fluid from a Dodge parts counter but that looks like it is the right fluid.

Not sure what is to be gained "upgrading" to DOT 4 from DOT 3. To reap all of any benefit there is to using DOT 4 you would have to flush the entire brake hydraulic system of all DOT 3 fluid. Sure you can do this but it takes time and is expensive using fresh DOT 4 fluid as a flushing fluid.

For street use and even some track (road course) use DOT 3 is fine. But I was told and I pass this on to you when one shows up at the track the brake fluid should be fresh. (Same with the engine oil.)

If the brakes get a bit soft that's not necessarily a sign you need better brake fluid but a sign you need to just take a cool down lap and then get off the track for a while.

If one is running in a race with a defined distance to race or a number of laps to make then one must of course have brakes that can go that distance or make those laps without showing any overheating issues. For a street car invariably this will require better brakes -- bigger with better cooling -- and even then brake fluid which can take the heat. It is at this point DOT 4 or even something more exotic could be the better choice.

But for a street car whatever brake fluid the car comes from the factory with is fine. All that it requires -- although some auto makers don't have this scheduled -- is a periodic flush of the fluid.

Years ago with my first car my auto tech buddies told I should flush and bleed the brakes every 2 years. I sort of did. Then some years later with my first European car the factory called for 2 year brake fluid flush/bleed service in the owners manual. And I generally adhere to what the factory calls for so I had this done every 2 years. But I thought it probably overkill. Then one time I let this go and experienced clutch (the clutch hydraulic system shared fluid with the brake hydraulic system) and transmission issues. Long story short a brake (and clutch) fluid flush/bleed had the clutch working just fine again and the transmission, too. (The transmission issues arose from the clutch not working right due to bad fluid.)

Made a believer in 2 year brake fluid flush/bleed services out of me.
 
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