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I have had a Whipple 2.9L blower on my 2012 Challenger RT since january 2016 with a little over 10,000 miles on it. The car is stock other than the blower and flowmaster outlaw catback. recently within the last couple hundred miles the exhaust started to sound alot differant. The flowmaster exhaust predates the blower and has been on there for close to 20,000 miles, but now it pops and crackles alot when decelerating which i love...... but also sounds like its having misfires at idle. The engine idle remains a constant rpm and the engine itself doesnt make any alarming noises at idle, but the constant hiccup in the exhaust has me worried. ive also been told by friends driving behind me that when i go WOT the exhaust smells of burnt matches.

Is this an issue or am i just freaking out over nothing, there are really no reputable performance shops near me to check it out as i live in kansas.

Any help would be greatly appriciated
 

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2017 challenger hellcat A8
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Check your plugs and compression. I have a Magnuson on mine. I occasional smelled gas when at idle. Had an occasional stumble if I accelerated mildly when I was in the 1500-1700 rpm
range. The car also sounded different, not louder or missing just different then it had. I decided I needed to get a real tune other then The one provided by Magnuson. I also asked for a compression check before the tune to ease my mind. The tuner tried to talk me out of it because the car drove so well. Cylinder #1 has one smashed plug and at 160, cylinder #2 low at 180, all others between 210-220.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Check your plugs and compression. I have a Magnuson on mine. I occasional smelled gas when at idle. Had an occasional stumble if I accelerated mildly when I was in the 1500-1700 rpm
range. The car also sounded different, not louder or missing just different then it had. I decided I needed to get a real tune other then The one provided by Magnuson. I also asked for a compression check before the tune to ease my mind. The tuner tried to talk me out of it because the car drove so well. Cylinder #1 has one smashed plug and at 160, cylinder #2 low at 180, all others between 210-220.
i checked plugs and their gap all looked like they should for 10k miles (when do plugs for a blower car need to be replaced?), i havent done a compression test as i do not have to tool. i will check into it.
 

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2017 challenger hellcat A8
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I think a lot depends on how hard you drive the car.
If I remember correctly it is 30,000 for the 5.7. Nice thing about the Hemi is the easy access to the plugs to check, just a lot of them.
 

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2020 Dodge Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack
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Supercharged engines are hard on plugs. The plug change schedule for a N/A engine may need to be cut by half or more. (My Boxster could go 60K miles on a set of plugs, my 996 Turbo half that. Those were the factory change intervals.)

Since you added a blower to an engine not really set up for supercharging it is likely harder on plugs than an engine designed from the ground up for supercharging. The pop/crackle is a sign the exhaust is rich the fuel is burning in the exhaust. A rich exhaust can arise from under performing plugs (and coils).

More power means more heat and more heat can affect the converters. A change in sound suggests the guts of the converters are failing. If you are not running converters then mufflers or whatever is used to help attenuate the exhaust sound.

The exhaust odor may be normal. Under hard acceleration the engine controller is allowed to enrich the mixture and ignore the #2 O2 sensor signals because under hard acceleration and a richer mixture the converters many not be able to process all the exhaust gases completely. If you are not running converters then the odor could still be normal.

Or the exhaust odor may not be normal. If the engine is not in good tune and if you are running converters due to the poor "quality" of the exhaust they may be failing to sustain or restart the proper chemical reaction and the odor is the result. Or the converters could just be bad.

I see you are in Overland Park, KS. You are not that far away from KC MO and that entire region. I have no experience with good speed shops in that region (when I lived there all my car work was done at the Porsche dealer or VW dealer in Merriam KS) but I believe I have read of good speed shops in the area. Unfortunately, I didn't note the name/location of the shop mentioned.

I vaguely recall some speed shops located close to Kansas Speedway. Do a web search and see what turns up. Find places that sell speed equipment and talk to the guys to ask where they would recommend you take your car.
 
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