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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I am getting a stubborn white film that has built up on the inside of my windows. I have a new 2011 SE with 1200 miles. I have been told that this is typical of new cars and it's a mixture of powders and plastics from the manufacturing process that will eventually go away. In the meantime, I am having to seriously work the windex on a weekly basis. Even with windex and elbow grease I am still having streaks. Anyone else experince this? Anyone have any ideas of a good cleaning process?

Thanks!
 

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No, No, No...........do not use Windex or anything like that. These sorts of cleaning products will not really clean your glass and are one of the causes of the film that you are getting.

Instead you need to use Invisible Glass and a proper glass cleaning cloth that is lint free. You can get the product either on line or at a number of stores, including Costco - Invisible Glass | No Streaks | Glass Cleaner
 

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Two years later and I still get a white film on the dash when it gets really cold. I have never put anything on the dash to clean it.
 

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I have been told that this is typical of new cars and it's a mixture of powders and plastics from the manufacturing process that will eventually go away ... Anyone else experience this?
It's a chemical reaction taking place from the chemicals in interior parts. It goes away after some time. Mostly noticeable when the car's interior gets heated. No special cleaning required because it's going to happen regardless of what you use to clean it.
 

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I was also going to post about rhe excessive off gassing of the interior parts. My windows get a film on them overnight. Pain in the butt but I am sure it will stop.
 

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raVenX has it right.

It's off-gassing from the plasticizers in some of the interior materials that create the film. Some cars are worse than others and the problem can last months, years or even seem to never go away but will usually dissipate over time (requiring less frequent cleaning). As raVenX also mentioned, heat tends to accelerate this process. ….that “new car smell” isn’t so attractive anymore, eh? ;)
 

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I have had this on every single cars windows from the dawn of time.
 

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ive found a lint free cloth works good,but anyone know how to drop the third brake light down to clean behind that? mine is very foggy!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Thanks for all of the feedback. Good to know it's not just me. Just a few follow ups: I don't recall this in my last car, but it has been over six years. Like everywhere else, it has been hot in Colorado; I've never run the heat (just purchased in May) but the air conditioning has been running daily. Still loving the new car smell! :)

Thanks Thumpr, I'll try the invisible glass!
 

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Just another endorsement for the Stoner's Invisible Glass. You'll laugh at the fact you ever used Windex. :thumbsup:
 

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My experience is that Commercial Windex in the aerosol can works as well or better than the premium products. In fact I always go back to the Commercial Windex after trying the other products.

A "napless" microfiber cloth made for windows helps also. Newspaper works well but leaves a mess on the dash.

I agree that Windex in the hand sprayer type bottle is worthless.
 

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+1 for invisible glass. using that in combination with a wadded up newspaper is the best combo IMO
 

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I am glad this came up. I have white film on the inside of my rear window and it has been there for over two years. Of course I have used windex to clean it off,but it does not work. Thanks for the info.
 

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yeah windex is one of the worst things to use because all the chemicals in it, it'll just haze over and leave film. invisible glass + wadded up newspaper is the best way to go.

it's kinda hard to get on the edges of glass, especially that back glass because it's hard to get down low and clean the corners and such but put in the effort and you'll like the results.

you'll notice how clean it'll be and it will "wow" you and you won't believe how much cleaner it will be since you're used to seeing that film and haze on there. do the same for your windshield, backseat windows and door windows.
 

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Also, If you smoke, don't do it in the car. cigerette smoke is one of the substances that really help to cause this kind of situation.
 

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Once in a while it really helps to hit the glass with Zaino Bros. Z-Glass Cleaner - very effective but it does take a little longer to wipe off the residue. I think it contains mild abrasives.

Castle brand Streak Proof Glass Cleaner (spray can) works well on all of my daily drivers, and/or as a regular maintenance cleaner over the time consuming Z cleaner.
 

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You can accelerate the outgassing process by raising the temperature to around 95* and increasing air circulation. Once you reach temperature maintain them for at least 10 hours. ASHRAE has a procedure for new construction, and the VOCs used to make modern commercial furnishings are pretty much the same used to make cars. If your car is garage kept just crank up a space heater in a safe place(i.e. not in your car) and point a box fan at your open windows. This will really speed up the outgassing though, so be aware that the "new car smell" will be very strong. There will still be outgassing for the life of the man made materials, but this will knock the worst of it out in no time.
 
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