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Discussion Starter #1
I am waiting for my 4K Blackvue 2 Channel Dash cam to get here. It has the live streaming feature so I wanted to have it connected to the wifi when I'm not home.

When i'm in my garage I have wifi connection in my garage, but the live streaming would mostly be for when I am away and I need to check on my car.

I know wifi is available in some FCA cars at a pretty expensive price.

Is it even available to the 2017 Challengers? I don't see any options in the Uconnect to purchase the mobile hotspot connection.

I was thinking of adding a data only plan to my Verizon account and putting the sim in my old iPhone 5 or 6 and using the mobile hotspot from the phone. Issue is i'll need to have it charged in the car when parked. If I leave it in the center console storage compartment I can charge it, I believe it uses the car battery even when the car isn't on. I'm not sure if it will at some point stop charging to not kill the battery. Issue is the phone will be left there and I don't want to do that.

Is there a way to wire something into the glove compartment to charge the phone and then lock it with the car keys? this way the phone will be out of sight and safe. is that too much trouble or should i just get one of those giant external batteries that can charge the phone 5 times over?
 

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I'm not going to be of much help here, but what radio do you have? My 2016 with the 8.4 radio has the wifi option. That is pretty cool that you could make your car a wifi hot spot, but the price...If I remember right, was something like $49 a month. :surprise:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm not going to be of much help here, but what radio do you have? My 2016 with the 8.4 radio has the wifi option. That is pretty cool that you could make your car a wifi hot spot, but the price...If I remember right, was something like $49 a month. :surprise:
I think the 2017 does not have that feature. Also I don't know what happened to Yelp but that feature is gone too. It would have been helpful when there is no reception and you need to find a good spot to eat or whatever. Is there a way to get Yelp on the 2017 Uconnect?
 

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Don't do it. Remember, whatever you can see through your remote connection to your camera, so can everyone else who wants to. Unless you're OK with that.
 

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Don't do it. Remember, whatever you can see through your remote connection to your camera, so can everyone else who wants to. Unless you're OK with that.
who the korean company that makes the dash cam? the us government or some random hacker? it's just the front and rear view of my car. i don't think i'm worth their time
 

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who the korean company that makes the dash cam? the us government or some random hacker? it's just the front and rear view of my car. i don't think i'm worth their time
Yeah, but what about when you have to dump a body out in the desert or something?
 

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i can unplug them when needed haha
Great, like wanton murder needed ANOTHER step.

Soon you'll get lazy and start stuffing them in your basement like some of those lunatics you see on TV.
 

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Just a caution. Your camera, plus your social media posts, plus your smart-home, your poorly secured wi-fi.....the more that's known about you on the internet, the easier it is to case your place and break in when you're not home. If someone can see your cameras and that your car hasn't moved for 3 days, and then see on your FB, that you're having the time of your life in Punta Cana, defeating your home security system and taking your stuff are just a piece of cake after that.
 

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Please. Stop.

You make an absurd number of assumptions, and rather than provide useful information, you pitch worst-case every time security is mentioned. (or technology, but we covered that)

Instead of touting how you're an "engineer" and "work at a nuke plant" (what's op-sec, anyway?),and preaching doom and gloom, consider an approach that's helpful. Fear-mongering has its place in the industry, but only after you've tried the carrot should you break out the stick.

Maybe you can make a post about how to secure your wifi, stay safe on social media, secure IOT devices, and all the other things you're so well versed in? Then we can go back to the actual questions and discussions at hand instead of the rants of someone who fears change and refuses to accept it. Deal?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Just a caution. Your camera, plus your social media posts, plus your smart-home, your poorly secured wi-fi.....the more that's known about you on the internet, the easier it is to case your place and break in when you're not home. If someone can see your cameras and that your car hasn't moved for 3 days, and then see on your FB, that you're having the time of your life in Punta Cana, defeating your home security system and taking your stuff are just a piece of cake after that.
My social media is all set to private and I don't add strangers. so i won't have the issue of bad people knowing where i'm at or not at. my wifi has password should be secure. my home is pretty smart, i have the smart lights and locks. i don't even know how they would hack my dash cam. even then they gotta break into my garage or front door.
 

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Please. Stop.

You make an absurd number of assumptions, and rather than provide useful information, you pitch worst-case every time security is mentioned. (or technology, but we covered that)

Instead of touting how you're an "engineer" and "work at a nuke plant" (what's op-sec, anyway?),and preaching doom and gloom, consider an approach that's helpful. Fear-mongering has its place in the industry, but only after you've tried the carrot should you break out the stick.

Maybe you can make a post about how to secure your wifi, stay safe on social media, secure IOT devices, and all the other things you're so well versed in? Then we can go back to the actual questions and discussions at hand instead of the rants of someone who fears change and refuses to accept it. Deal?
OK then. If you must have a Wi-Fi source (hardwired is better because you can physically unplug your network), secure it with a password phrase that only you would know. Something like "My Challenger is a humpty great truck" is nearly impossible to hack, as opposed to a standard 8 character password with one Capital letter, one number and one special character, which is amazingly easy to hack.

Disable any "locator" features on social media that automatically informs people of your current location, and never post photos and messages from your vacation (notifying everyone that you're not at home).

In general, turn off your internet connection, Alexa, and any other internet connected devices when not in use.

If you live or work in an area where your car is within range of your key-fob at all times (and the car is not secured in a garage), consider switching to a hard-physical key and remove the batteries from your key-fob. Car thieves are able to record and clone your keyfob's RF signature, including security, and gain access to your car.

All "connectivity" conveniences come with added security risks. Everyone should educate themselves of the risks involved to make informed decision on whether the convenience is worth the risk.
 

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Never hacked (see my precautions). I had a debit card skimmed at a gas pump once. Now I do all of my retail transactions with cash.

Working in the high-tech industry, I deal with securing critical infrastructure. Obviously "really" bad people want to get at the electric grid, water treatment facilities, stuff that can terrorize society or infiltrate government/military infrastructure. The stereo-typical "Russian hacker" is in it for the $$$. Get's paid to retrieve data, launch denial of service attacks, targets are large businesses and financial instutions. The next level of hacker is the one that wants your financial information (the debit card skimmer), so he can empty your bank account or run up charges on your credit card. At the lowest level, is the car/home thief who will compromise your security to either steal your car or steal stuff from it, or break into your home. Each level has a different amount of expertise required and the reward is commensurate with the skills and risk involved. In general, home and car security are the lowest tech, and easiest to hack. And in the hands of a under-informed consumer, they often do nothing but provide a false sense of security.

Think of this. In the old days, to break into a car, a thief either had to be skilled enough to jimmy the lock, or bold enough to break the glass. Now he just has to have a simple device he can buy off the internet, that clones your keyfob. Some of them have algorithms that ping the car until it gets a response, and then runs through known codes until it finds one that opens it. Thief doesn't even need to steal your keyfob RF signature. Keypad operated home security systems are also very vulnerable. A large percentage of people use codes like "1234" "1111" or "2580" (down the center of the keypad). People also often use the same 4-digit PIN on their debit card that they do for their home/car security or online account verification. Once the bad guy has it, he often can access other places you've used it.

The way I deal with this is that each of my cars has two keyfobs. When I'm just driving around my rural area and small town, I use the regular keyfob. When I go to high population areas, i use the second fob (that has the battery removed) and I use the hard-key to open the door and plug the fob into the ignition switch to start the car. My home security is strong doors and locks, and a heavily armed occupant. Bad guy will have to break a door or window because I haven't provided electric locks that can be defeated.

Too many consumers have the attitude that many posters here have. "Nobody will target me", "I won't live in paranoia", etc... But it's precisely those attitudes that make them more vulnerable, either because they trust the "security" in their devices as proclaimed by the manufacturer or they assume "It will never happen to me".
 

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You're still generally missing the point about your personal paranoia and risk tolerance leaking into every car post. Not everyone has the same risk tolerance as you do, and scaling everything to the level of "tin foil" isn't for everyone.

I really don't need "the industry" explained to me, but I do feel that you should temper your approach. Know your audience.
 

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Never hacked (see my precautions). I had a debit card skimmed at a gas pump once. Now I do all of my retail transactions with cash.

Working in the high-tech industry, I deal with securing critical infrastructure. Obviously "really" bad people want to get at the electric grid, water treatment facilities, stuff that can terrorize society or infiltrate government/military infrastructure. The stereo-typical "Russian hacker" is in it for the $$$. Get's paid to retrieve data, launch denial of service attacks, targets are large businesses and financial instutions. The next level of hacker is the one that wants your financial information (the debit card skimmer), so he can empty your bank account or run up charges on your credit card. At the lowest level, is the car/home thief who will compromise your security to either steal your car or steal stuff from it, or break into your home. Each level has a different amount of expertise required and the reward is commensurate with the skills and risk involved. In general, home and car security are the lowest tech, and easiest to hack. And in the hands of a under-informed consumer, they often do nothing but provide a false sense of security.

Think of this. In the old days, to break into a car, a thief either had to be skilled enough to jimmy the lock, or bold enough to break the glass. Now he just has to have a simple device he can buy off the internet, that clones your keyfob. Some of them have algorithms that ping the car until it gets a response, and then runs through known codes until it finds one that opens it. Thief doesn't even need to steal your keyfob RF signature. Keypad operated home security systems are also very vulnerable. A large percentage of people use codes like "1234" "1111" or "2580" (down the center of the keypad). People also often use the same 4-digit PIN on their debit card that they do for their home/car security or online account verification. Once the bad guy has it, he often can access other places you've used it.

The way I deal with this is that each of my cars has two keyfobs. When I'm just driving around my rural area and small town, I use the regular keyfob. When I go to high population areas, i use the second fob (that has the battery removed) and I use the hard-key to open the door and plug the fob into the ignition switch to start the car. My home security is strong doors and locks, and a heavily armed occupant. Bad guy will have to break a door or window because I haven't provided electric locks that can be defeated.

Too many consumers have the attitude that many posters here have. "Nobody will target me", "I won't live in paranoia", etc... But it's precisely those attitudes that make them more vulnerable, either because they trust the "security" in their devices as proclaimed by the manufacturer or they assume "It will never happen to me".

Good info. But coming from a law enforcement world, 70-80% of crime is crimes of opportunity, which means doors were unlocked, windows opens, keys left in cars etc. Yeah there is the 15-20% of crimes that are conducted by professional or semi professional criminals. End of the day locks on things, windows closed and semi non easy passwords on most things will keep you safe. Also the majority of crime something like another 80% of crime is conducted by somebody you know in shape or form so no this idea that the world is so bad these days isn't true, its the people you know. Fun fact crime is at its lowest point in the US since the 1960s, so world is actually safer at least in the US.
 

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You're still generally missing the point about your personal paranoia and risk tolerance leaking into every car post. Not everyone has the same risk tolerance as you do, and scaling everything to the level of "tin foil" isn't for everyone.

I really don't need "the industry" explained to me, but I do feel that you should temper your approach. Know your audience.
What you call "paranoia", I call "common sense precautions". And the audience are people who leap with both feet into fancy shiny technology without knowing the risks....which is everyone trying to link their Alexa to their UConnect and their I-Phone to their home-security cameras.
 
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