Dodge Challenger Forum banner

41 - 60 of 65 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Yeah unfortunately you have snow birds that can't drive worth a dam.
Hear that!
My Challenger stays garaged around here quite a bit in "winter" months because of that, take it out later at night when the snowbirds are all home in their RV's sleeping.
All kidding aside, thinking the OP's vehicle either has a tango uniform fuel pump or maybe a battery disconnect may be in order to reboot the PCM.......see what happens!
 

·
Registered
2020 Dodge Challenger R/T, 6 Speed
Joined
·
18 Posts
When you added the fuel conditioner/stabilizer did you run the car for a bit after you added it? When I store vehicles I usually add it at the gas station that way it gets all in there.
If you have a Schrader valve on the fuel rails, you don't necessarily need a gauge either after it's been sitting all winter. Just take a small Allen wrench or screwdriver and press it to see if there is pressure (use a rag so it doesn't get everywhere). If your fuel pump isn't working after sitting for that long, there won't be any pressure in the system.
Have you tried jump starting the car? Even with a fresh charge a bad battery could be causing this if it has been sitting.
I would go down it in this order.
1) try jumping car or using a different battery. This will rule out your battery or confirm if that's the problem.
2) check all fuses and relays and check for fuel pressure.
2.5) optional (at your own risk) use a tiny bit of starting fluid. If you have bad fuel already in your engine this could burn it off and this could confirm whether you have spark. Also, if your car starts but then dies then you aren't getting fuel. Don't do this if you aren't 100% confident in it though.
3) check electrical into the fuel pump (or out of the relay) with a multimeter. If you have voltage to the fuel pump but no fuel out then that's your problem.

Another thing you can do is "crack" a fuel line. Just undo it at a connection somewhere (have somewhere for the fuel to go) and check for flow. If you are getting flow but no fuel into the engine then it could be injectors are clogged.

Spark being the problem is a possibility but doubtful when you have 8 different coils and 16 plugs a lot fo stuff would have to go bad for that to be the problem so I would focus on fuel.
Start with electrical at the battery and follow it all the way to the fuel pump. Then start with fuel at the fuel pump and follow it all the way to the engine.

Also, do you have a cel on? Have you read the codes?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
631 Posts
Could be a bad fuse.




Learned a lesson on fuses recently, when the clutch on the AC compressor failed to engaged on the GMC truck. Found the fuses had not blown, so that had me thinking it may be low pressure switch activating due to a low charge. Come to find out the system came back on line after removing the fuses for a closer inspection and reinstalling them. That was a quick and inexpensive repair...




HOT ROD ON
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,668 Posts
Probably a low battery.Someone was right about unhooking cable before charging.
Why would anyone fill the tank before storage?
I don't drive mine much so I keep the fuel well below a half so I can add fresh fuel more often.Gas starts going bad pretty quickly.I know stabil works good on yard equipment.
I assume it's safe for cars.The worst thing for any combustion engine is to let it sit for long periods of time without starting.That is his first mistake.Electronics to some degree need to be run.You ever put something away working,plug it in ,no go,or slow then start working fine.
(Or not)
It don't hurt to hold brake and go through gears with motor running if it's not driven to keep Trans seals lubed also.

Just bored and ran out of beer.Should I risk death and disease to go to the store and buy beers???

Carry on!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,358 Posts
After reading many of these posts, I was kind of shaking my head. I had this very same thing happen to me last year. I put my car away in October and left the battery connected. I came back to the car in April and went to start her. Nuthin"......not even a click or an interior light. I put a jumper box on the car and still....nuthin'. I took the battery out and went to Auto Zone....(after charging the battery for about 2 hours). Auto Zone said that the battery was very low and he could charge it over night. The Auto Zone is too far away and I said I have a charger at home. The guy told me that it would need to sit on trickle charge for 4-5 hours and then set it to full charge for overnight. (With positive and negative terminals attached). I did as he said.....the next morning 10-11 hours of charging and she started right up. The battery was over 4 years old and I replaced it for shitz and giggles anyway and now I bought a good trickle charger for my winter storage. My car is a 2014 RT Plus automatic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
I drove the car into the garage after filling the tank and adding fuel storage conditioner. Covered it and left it for the winter. I uncovered it and charged the battery. Now she cranks but will not start. Any suggestions please.
My 2009 SRT8 6 speed did the same thing after sitting all winter in my garage. You need to make sure that the battery is fully charged first. Then place the car in the run position and listen for the fuel pump in the tank. Sometimes after sitting for a long time the fuel pump does not want to engage. Never been an issue with a blown fuse, just takes a fully charged battery and a couple of trys to get the pump to come alive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Probably a low battery.Someone was right about unhooking cable before charging.
Why would anyone fill the tank before storage?
I don't drive mine much so I keep the fuel well below a half so I can add fresh fuel more often.Gas starts going bad pretty quickly.I know stabil works good on yard equipment.
I assume it's safe for cars.The worst thing for any combustion engine is to let it sit for long periods of time without starting.That is his first mistake.Electronics to some degree need to be run.You ever put something away working,plug it in ,no go,or slow then start working fine.
(Or not)
It don't hurt to hold brake and go through gears with motor running if it's not driven to keep Trans seals lubed also.

Just bored and ran out of beer.Should I risk death and disease to go to the store and buy beers???

Carry on!
Yes!!! And get me a 12 pack please!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
Storin a car with that low on fuel Bad Dayona causes lots of problems.It will rain inside your fuel tank(sweat)unless you keep it atmospherically temperture controlled.I always top off with stabilizers or with some power eq.make sure the engine and tank are run dry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
I agree old cars can have moisture issues since they have vented gas tanks. These new cars have sealed fuel tanks. I run E-85 and had dropped a valve I let the car sit outside in MN for 2 years. (Tired of working on the car)After 2 years I tested the fuel. It still tested at 85% ethanol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,668 Posts
Plus the old ones had metal tanks,steel lines.The blended fuels the alcohol also absorbs some moisture and the moisture is burned off.
I understand that the less fuel the more area for condensation that's a valid point.I don't let the Challenger sit for long periods.We have very little freezing temperature.
So there are different circumstances.That being said I have only driven my SRT about 2000 miles in three years.The truck I've had for 26 years sits a couple of months sometimes and fires right up.I have always not filled the tank on vehicles that are not driven much so I can add fresh fuel when I drive them. That has been for at least 43 years. I have always had a number of cars at any time ,and some are not used often. Then and now. I have not had any moisture issues , only an old fuel issues that gummed up everything.
But that's just me....Maybe just lucky!!
When it comes to my Mopars I have always been lucky.
I loved all 16 or more of them,and the six I have now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,358 Posts
Ethynol gas lasts anywhere from 3-6 months. It is hydrophilic, meaning it likes to absorb water. If it has access to air/humidity you will have problems. Regular gasoline is hydrophobic and repels water. Adding fuel stabilizer will make your gas last longer anywhere from 1-3 years depending on conditions. Old gas can be rejuvenated with addition of new gas. If you have old gas with no stabilizer you can add some new fuel and the engine may run, but not as powerful. I bought a parts car (67 Cadillac) that sat in the guys back yard for years. The freeze out plugs had blown out and there was no water in the engine. The guy put a battery on it, pumped the pedal a few times and she started up and he drove it out of the bushes. This was 30+ years ago. Gas has definitely changed since then.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
My E-85 still tested at E-85. The tested measures alcohol percentages. Since the fuel system is sealed it could not absorb water after 2 years of sitting.
 

·
Registered
2015 RT 5.7 M6
Joined
·
7,507 Posts
Ethynol gas lasts anywhere from 3-6 months. It is hydrophilic, meaning it likes to absorb water. If it has access to air/humidity you will have problems. Regular gasoline is hydrophobic and repels water. Adding fuel stabilizer will make your gas last longer anywhere from 1-3 years depending on conditions. Old gas can be rejuvenated with addition of new gas. If you have old gas with no stabilizer you can add some new fuel and the engine may run, but not as powerful. I bought a parts car (67 Cadillac) that sat in the guys back yard for years. The freeze out plugs had blown out and there was no water in the engine. The guy put a battery on it, pumped the pedal a few times and she started up and he drove it out of the bushes. This was 30+ years ago. Gas has definitely changed since then.
Not only gas but the complexity of engine management has changed. Used to be all you needed was to get power to the coil and starter, a coke can filled with fuel and you can get the engine to run. I guess that is why I love Road Kill Garage. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,668 Posts
The coke can with gas!An old tradition.Just don't hold the can or jar over the carb while someone is cranking the car like my dad !The engine backfired through the carb,shot a flame which ignited the jar that was thrown into the ditch,that burned the field and almost someone's house and barn.With the help of passerby and the fire department all ended without any carnage.I was young at the time but that was one lesson I have not forgot.
 

·
Registered
2015 RT 5.7 M6
Joined
·
7,507 Posts
Or don't put it down near your actual coke can otherwise you may end up with a mouth full of gas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
139 Posts
I agree on the sealed system but the temp swings pay a huge rule.I have seen even on newer vehicles that went from cold to a warm front that would have the fuel tank sweating on the out side right at the fuel level inside the tank.I would think that it would also under those conditions it would also be sweating inside it as well.That,s why Sta-Bill 360 was designed.
 
41 - 60 of 65 Posts
Top