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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited by Moderator)
Hello everyone,

So I'd like to preface this by saying I did a brief search and couldn't find exactly what I'm looking for and could'nt really dig deep for too long as I'm at work.

I previously owned a 13 SRT8, and it was the saddest day of my life (no joke!) when I had to let it go because of financial reasons.

Today, I am literally 4 weeks away from being completely 100% debt free, and I plan to start aggressively working toward getting another Challenger, because man do I miss that car every day.

Now, my SRT was a summer pavement princess, only driven 6 months of the year and that's it.

My next one, will be a daily in any weather year round. I've done my research and I know driving them can be easily done with proper winter tires, weight, etc. And living in Canada growing up driving rwd its nothing new to me.

My QUESTION, is between the SRT and R/T, which would be easier to control on snow and ice with proper tires? I'm wondering if the HP difference makes the SRT more likely to kick out? My logic tells me the R/T would be easier to control, but I have no experience to base it on so thought I'd bring it up here.

My rough target for getting my next Challenger is Sept of 2022, so still a ways away yet. I really want another SRT, but if the R/T is a bit easier in winter, I would be willing to consider it as at least its still a V8. I'm not really worried about price per se, it's more about the right car.

Again, I apologize if this particular question has already been kicked to death!
 

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Congratulations on being smart enough to let the car go and get your finances under control! Excellent news on being debt free next month.
Remember it’s just a car and it’s so easy to fall back into the trap, a mod here or there etc.
I was there myself years ago and nothing is more soothing than having enough money in the bank to be able to breathe easily. I continued that path and paid my house off 9 years early that was an amazing feeling. Keep it going, don’t live for a car.
I had many RWD cars in the snow, it just sucked even if I could get around. I prefer my pickup and not just to get places, if I get whacked I’m sitting up higher and better protected.
As awesome as these cars are they really aren’t all weather vehicles. Good luck to you.
 
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I don't think that there would be much difference between driving a 5.7 or 6.4 Challenger in the snow. They both have a lot of torque. I would recommend getting the 6.4 in either SRT or R/T Scat Pack form and buying four Blizzak snow tires.

I know that you want another Hemi, but the best bet for traction in the snow would be the all wheel drive GT model, with the 3.6 engine.
 

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This is an interesting topic as I live in Florida and do not need to worry about the seasons, however I am curious to know if an LSD makes any difference. I know FR is handicapped because the engine's sitting in front does not give enough traction to the rear wheels. That being said, would an LSD help the car at least not slip any further and even when one wheel loses traction it still gets enough power to the other wheel that has traction? Or because it is a front engine car, it is pretty much doomed in snow?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Congratulations on being smart enough to let the car go and get your finances under control! Excellent news on being debt free next month.
Remember it’s just a car and it’s so easy to fall back into the trap, a mod here or there etc.
I was there myself years ago and nothing is more soothing than having enough money in the bank to be able to breathe easily. I continued that path and paid my house off 9 years early that was an amazing feeling. Keep it going, don’t live for a car.
I had many RWD cars in the snow, it just sucked even if I could get around. I prefer my pickup and not just to get places, if I get whacked I’m sitting up higher and better protected.
As awesome as these cars are they really aren’t all weather vehicles. Good luck to you.
Thanks Yellow :).

No i absolutely agree. Im planning to get another because i promised myself once i got through everything, id have another one one day. Im also in a much better job position now, which allows me to save alot more towards it while thankfully not compromising other areas. Im waiting though to get it so ill have 2/3 to put down if not more and be able to pay it off in a year or two vs those crazy 84+ months you see advertised. Trust me ive had a lot of time to think about how to do it the right way without taking away from other obligations lol :).

This all came about because i ran into a gentleman driving an SRT this weekend, at the grocery store of all places. I asked how he does it in winter, and he chalks it up to good tires, patience, planning, pay attention to the weather and plan accordingly, put weight in the rear, ect.

In my case i dont plan to let winter stop me from having my dream car again lol. Just looking at all angles to do it the right way.

I don't think that there would be much difference between driving a 5.7 or 6.4 Challenger in the snow. They both have a lot of torque. I would recommend getting the 6.4 in either SRT or R/T Scat Pack form and buying four Blizzak snow tires.

I know that you want another Hemi, but the best bet for traction in the snow would be the all wheel drive GT model, with the 3.6 engine.
Thanks Cuda :),

i realize no set of winter tires and "good" winter driving in a rwd will amount to the capability of the GT lol. But, eh, no i want to get one of those two. Just doesnt feel "right" otherwise lol.

2 things i didnt mention

Thankfully i work from home full time and only occasionally have to go out for work, so i wouldnt per se depend on it every single day. I really only go out right now on weekends and thats it, so in that sense it wouldnt be too bad.

Also, after i get it, my next plan is to move to British Columbia, specifically to kelowna, for fam reasons. And the winter there is far more mild (usually) than here with alot less snow, so in that regard i think it would be ok.

This is an interesting topic as I live in Florida and do not need to worry about the seasons, however I am curious to know if an LSD makes any difference. I know FR is handicapped because the engine's sitting in front does not give enough traction to the rear wheels. That being said, would an LSD help the car at least not slip any further and even when one wheel loses traction it still gets enough power to the other wheel that has traction? Or because it is a front engine car, it is pretty much doomed in snow?
Rick the closest approximation i have really, would be my first couple cars, an 89 and a 91 mercury grand marquis. I installed a LSD into both, and with weight in the back i almost never got stuck save for 2 times i can remember. But also those were super underpowered compared to a challenger, lol
 

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It not the car model but the tires and wheels. Ideally have 18 inch wheels with good snow tires for the winter. I Have had both the cars and tire combos and long winters to note the differences.
 

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If you can live with a V6 I would get the AWD GT.
If it has to have a hemi, either one with performance all season tires (or better with an extra set of winter tires for the heavy Canada snow).
 

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I won't be driving my Challenger in the winter but I have fond memories of driving V8 rwd cars in the winter here in Minnesota.
 

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This is an interesting topic as I live in Florida and do not need to worry about the seasons, however I am curious to know if an LSD makes any difference. I know FR is handicapped because the engine's sitting in front does not give enough traction to the rear wheels. That being said, would an LSD help the car at least not slip any further and even when one wheel loses traction it still gets enough power to the other wheel that has traction? Or because it is a front engine car, it is pretty much doomed in snow?
I have owned two challengers, one a 3.5 L, and my current R/T with a manual trans and the LSD. The LSD definately helps with winter traction. The Dodge LSD delivers power to both wheels all of the time, it is not the type of LSD that requires one wheel to spin before the other side engages.

I ran the 3.5 L for a long time with all season tires in the winter. I live in an area with a lot of steep hills. If it snowed, I took longer routes with flatter roads. I finally bought a set of studded snow tires. I went hardcore, and got studded snows on all four tires. It helped, but not as much as I hoped, and I still had to choose flatter roads when it snowed.

I traded the 3.5 L in on my R/T. I installed the same set of studded tires on the R/T, and it was like I was driving a 4WD truck. I could go up or down the steepest hills with ease. Studs on the front tires helped with braking distance on both cars, stopped on a dime in snow. The downside to studs on the front is the vibration in the steering wheel.

So, I made the decision to remove the studs, ran with the snow tires last summer. Driving in the snow this winter, it no longer stops on a dime, and I was spinning the rear wheels driving up a moderately sloped hill, but still had better traction than my old 3.5 L with the studs
 

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For al year around driving I gotta agree with getting a AWD GT model. Don't knock the V6 as it's one really good engine. No it's not a HEMI or SRT of any kind but man in the snow and bad weather, you'll be thanking yourself each mile.

I have a 2020 Scat Pack and my Wife has a AWD SXT. I absolutely rather drive my Wife's AWD with just All season tires then the Scat Pack. The Scat Pack is a monster and I know controlling it in bad weather will be a challenge. It has not seen snow and I rarely drive it in the rain unless I have to. I like to leave it in the garage most of the time unless it's nice out.

There is a part of my that wishes I made the GT move with AWD because we do get snow, we also get tons of rain and driving in those bad conditions there is nothing like having that stable feeling underneath you with the AWD model. They are still fun , you can mod them with Super chargers if you like to have your cake and eat it to I can go on and on how the AWD model is better then the Scat Pack as a daily.

Don't get me wrong, I love the Scat Pack and it's absolutely incredible to drive when it's nice out. But I don't think I can take daily driving it. I'm looking for an affordable Daily for weather conditions as I just can't bring myself to subject the Scat Pack to the weather. I hate it even getting dusty let alone snowed on.

I know you said it's your dream car, I'm wondering if you can get a R/T then and a Daily? Save yourself some cash by getting the R/T , equip it with just what you need and use the money you would have spend on a Scat Pack or Hellcat and get a used Truck or something AWD/4WD. To me I think it's the way to go. Snow tires would be a must if you don't or can't get a Daily.

On a side note the R/T is absolutely plenty for the street and very mod friendly and better modded then the Scat pack.
I think the R/T is the best all around out of the HEMI models as it's in the sweet spot most think the Scat Pack sits. The more I think about it , the more I feel the GEM is the R/T. The Scat Pack is killer fast and mean but man it spins the tires so badly it becomes not even worth trying to make pull on the street. The R/T also spins but is way more manageable.

I'm real curious on what you decide and would like to hear your thoughts.
 

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Hello everyone,

So I'd like to preface this by saying I did a brief search and couldn't find exactly what I'm looking for and could'nt really dig deep for too long as I'm at work.

I previously owned a 13 SRT8, and it was the saddest day of my life (no joke!) when I had to let it go because of financial reasons.

Today, I am literally 4 weeks away from being completely 100% debt free, and I plan to start aggressively working toward getting another Challenger, because man do I miss that car every day.

Now, my SRT was a summer pavement princess, only driven 6 months of the year and that's it.

My next one, will be a daily in any weather year round. I've done my research and I know driving them can be easily done with proper winter tires, weight, etc. And living in Canada growing up driving rwd its nothing new to me.

My QUESTION, is between the SRT and R/T, which would be easier to control on snow and ice with proper tires? I'm wondering if the HP difference makes the SRT more likely to kick out? My logic tells me the R/T would be easier to control, but I have no experience to base it on so thought I'd bring it up here.

My rough target for getting my next Challenger is Sept of 2022, so still a ways away yet. I really want another SRT, but if the R/T is a bit easier in winter, I would be willing to consider it as at least its still a V8. I'm not really worried about price per se, it's more about the right car.

Again, I apologize if this particular question has already been kicked to death!
I have experience in this regard. I live in Saskatchewan, our winters suck. I went from a 2010 R/T to a 2016 Scat Pack 392 (Which would be very similar in power, ride height, wheels/tires and brakes as your 2013 SRT). Both my cars were 6 speed manual, and daily driven. I'll tell you that both cars have been just fine in snow. I will say that the slightly lower height of the Scat Pack does tend to result in more scraping of the chin spoiler when the roads are not plowed. With the 2010, this was almost never an issue. But, it doesn't really hurt the car. It's just snow.

As for ease of getting around, there is pretty much no difference. The throttle is no more touchy. Remember just because you have more power doesn't mean you have to use it all the time. As with any vehicle it depends on your right foot.
 

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I have experience in this regard. I live in Saskatchewan, our winters suck. I went from a 2010 R/T to a 2016 Scat Pack 392 (Which would be very similar in power, ride height, wheels/tires and brakes as your 2013 SRT). Both my cars were 6 speed manual, and daily driven. I'll tell you that both cars have been just fine in snow. I will say that the slightly lower height of the Scat Pack does tend to result in more scraping of the chin spoiler when the roads are not plowed. With the 2010, this was almost never an issue. But, it doesn't really hurt the car. It's just snow.

As for ease of getting around, there is pretty much no difference. The throttle is no more touchy. Remember just because you have more power doesn't mean you have to use it all the time. As with any vehicle it depends on your right foot.
Exactly right. The engine only delivers as much power as the driver commands via the gas pedal. If the driver can't be relied upon to dial in the right and safe amount of power for the situation he shouldn't be behind the wheel.

To the OP: Fit a set of real snow tires to the car. Ideally they should be chain or cable compatible provided the car is chain/cable compatible.

When I drove other cars in the winter in snow I'd add weight -- sand bags -- to the rear of the car or with my mid engine and rear engine cars to the front trunk (to help the front tires obtain more "bite" in the snow). With my front wheel drive car I'd add weight to the trunk to help the undriven rear tires bite better.

About 200lbs is about right.

With my VW Golf I added a box of tire cables to the trunk -- never had to use them -- and a length of heavy nylon towing strap and various u-bolts/hooks. The new "kenetic" ropes look interesting too. Had the strap and hardware in case I got stuck and I need a tow (or a "yank") out of a snow bank. Never did but it still was nice to have that in the car just in case.
 

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Before getting my 2016 Challenger R/T A8, I had never owned a RWD car. And I got it in the middle of the coldest and snowiest winter we have seen in years. I run Bridgestone blizzak dm-v2 tires. I must say that I am pleasantly suprised how well the front end is holding on the slippery roads BUT at the same time the rear end is all over the place. The torque and agressive camber on the rear really doesn't help. But I must admit that it's also makes the driving quite fun. And if you don't want to have fun, you can still drive it "normally" in the city light-to-light traffic when you are gentle with the gas pedal.

So I think that if you really want the 392, then go for it. Both of the cars have too much torque for snow and ice, so I don't think one will be easier to drive than another. If you want the automatic then the SRT might even offer you more grip and control because of the LSD differential. But at the same time, it is probably easier for an unexperienced driver to spin a LSD- equipped car than an open diff one. But I'm pretty sure there ain't no bad drivers in this forum.

And finally, there is a another reason why so many challenger owners don't drive their cars in the winter and that is rust. I have heard horror stories of rust spots coming up on cars that have only seen 3-4 winters. Maybe the rust proofing has gotten better in the last years models but as long as they fill the panels with foam, there is still a chance that the foam is collecting salt water during the winter and then letting it do its thing during the summer. But if you buy a new car with warranty, you don't have to worry about that too much either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I have experience in this regard. I live in Saskatchewan, our winters suck. I went from a 2010 R/T to a 2016 Scat Pack 392 (Which would be very similar in power, ride height, wheels/tires and brakes as your 2013 SRT). Both my cars were 6 speed manual, and daily driven. I'll tell you that both cars have been just fine in snow. I will say that the slightly lower height of the Scat Pack does tend to result in more scraping of the chin spoiler when the roads are not plowed. With the 2010, this was almost never an issue. But, it doesn't really hurt the car. It's just snow.

As for ease of getting around, there is pretty much no difference. The throttle is no more touchy. Remember just because you have more power doesn't mean you have to use it all the time. As with any vehicle it depends on your right foot.
Black you are super close to me, im in Alberta :D. Our winters are almost identical to yours haha.

Thank you everyone for the feedback, i appreciate the various insights.

Another reason im sticking to RT or SRT is because realistically ill only be putting up with winter driving it here for a year or two, as after i get it be moving to the okanagan hopefully a year or two afterward where winters are far more mild most of the time. My dad lives there and is telling me he sees mustangs and challengers year around usually and its not nearly as prone to rust vehiclewise there as is here.

When i had my SRT, i DID have a daily that i drove all the time, ect. And per se while i "could" do that when i move, due to differences in lifestyle there it will just be far more simpler to have 1 vehicle, which is why i want the challenger. I realize there will be alot of challenges and adaptation to be made, as well as preventative measures on the car, but id rather have the car i truly want vs never trying for it again if it means driving it year round.

Ill definitely be hanging around here, the advice is great, like i said im still a while away yet, but ill be updating the journey towards it here.

Here is a pic of my previous SRT, this is what motivates me lol. Soon

1013434
 

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I have owned two challengers, one a 3.5 L, and my current R/T with a manual trans and the LSD. The LSD definately helps with winter traction. The Dodge LSD delivers power to both wheels all of the time, it is not the type of LSD that requires one wheel to spin before the other side engages.

I ran the 3.5 L for a long time with all season tires in the winter. I live in an area with a lot of steep hills. If it snowed, I took longer routes with flatter roads. I finally bought a set of studded snow tires. I went hardcore, and got studded snows on all four tires. It helped, but not as much as I hoped, and I still had to choose flatter roads when it snowed.

I traded the 3.5 L in on my R/T. I installed the same set of studded tires on the R/T, and it was like I was driving a 4WD truck. I could go up or down the steepest hills with ease. Studs on the front tires helped with braking distance on both cars, stopped on a dime in snow. The downside to studs on the front is the vibration in the steering wheel.

So, I made the decision to remove the studs, ran with the snow tires last summer. Driving in the snow this winter, it no longer stops on a dime, and I was spinning the rear wheels driving up a moderately sloped hill, but still had better traction than my old 3.5 L with the studs
Thank you very much and it is good to know that the LSD helps.
 
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Black you are super close to me, im in Alberta :D. Our winters are almost identical to yours haha.

Thank you everyone for the feedback, i appreciate the various insights.

Another reason im sticking to RT or SRT is because realistically ill only be putting up with winter driving it here for a year or two, as after i get it be moving to the okanagan hopefully a year or two afterward where winters are far more mild most of the time. My dad lives there and is telling me he sees mustangs and challengers year around usually and its not nearly as prone to rust vehiclewise there as is here.

When i had my SRT, i DID have a daily that i drove all the time, ect. And per se while i "could" do that when i move, due to differences in lifestyle there it will just be far more simpler to have 1 vehicle, which is why i want the challenger. I realize there will be alot of challenges and adaptation to be made, as well as preventative measures on the car, but id rather have the car i truly want vs never trying for it again if it means driving it year round.

Ill definitely be hanging around here, the advice is great, like i said im still a while away yet, but ill be updating the journey towards it here.

Here is a pic of my previous SRT, this is what motivates me lol. Soon

View attachment 1013434
I didn't notice that you are also in Canada. Awesome. But do us a favor and please stop sending your winter storms our way? Every time a snowpocalypse or severe cold snap happens, it always seems to originate in your province and then blow over here.
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I didn't notice that you are also in Canada. Awesome. But do us a favor and please stop sending your winter storms our way? Every time a snowpocalypse or severe cold snap happens, it always seems to originate in your province and then blow over here.
:ROFLMAO: This is why i want to move to BC! get away from this! lol will try to keep it over here for you!
 

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For al year around driving I gotta agree with getting a AWD GT model. Don't knock the V6 as it's one really good engine. No it's not a HEMI or SRT of any kind but man in the snow and bad weather, you'll be thanking yourself each mile.

I have a 2020 Scat Pack and my Wife has a AWD SXT. I absolutely rather drive my Wife's AWD with just All season tires then the Scat Pack. The Scat Pack is a monster and I know controlling it in bad weather will be a challenge. It has not seen snow and I rarely drive it in the rain unless I have to. I like to leave it in the garage most of the time unless it's nice out.

There is a part of my that wishes I made the GT move with AWD because we do get snow, we also get tons of rain and driving in those bad conditions there is nothing like having that stable feeling underneath you with the AWD model. They are still fun , you can mod them with Super chargers if you like to have your cake and eat it to I can go on and on how the AWD model is better then the Scat Pack as a daily.

Don't get me wrong, I love the Scat Pack and it's absolutely incredible to drive when it's nice out. But I don't think I can take daily driving it. I'm looking for an affordable Daily for weather conditions as I just can't bring myself to subject the Scat Pack to the weather. I hate it even getting dusty let alone snowed on.

I know you said it's your dream car, I'm wondering if you can get a R/T then and a Daily? Save yourself some cash by getting the R/T , equip it with just what you need and use the money you would have spend on a Scat Pack or Hellcat and get a used Truck or something AWD/4WD. To me I think it's the way to go. Snow tires would be a must if you don't or can't get a Daily.

On a side note the R/T is absolutely plenty for the street and very mod friendly and better modded then the Scat pack.
I think the R/T is the best all around out of the HEMI models as it's in the sweet spot most think the Scat Pack sits. The more I think about it , the more I feel the GEM is the R/T. The Scat Pack is killer fast and mean but man it spins the tires so badly it becomes not even worth trying to make pull on the street. The R/T also spins but is way more manageable.

I'm real curious on what you decide and would like to hear your thoughts.

I agree whole heartedly. I was and still am impressed with power of the 345. We had a 2010 R/T till it was totaled in November. We replaced it with a 2019 392. The power of the 392 is outrageous. The 345 was the perfect daily driving car.
 
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