Dodge Challenger Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I discovered a "less than manly" tool in my kitchen to free frozen windows. Easy to find in the trunk, too, and more convenient than an old card. It's an offset spatula. Works great! Lots of snow here today :(
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
303 Posts
That's interesting. It seems to be working well for you.
Just a thought, consider experimenting with a dry lubricant like graphite or silicone. It may go a long way to reducing how tightly any ice can "bond" to the rubber. Try it in a small area and see how it works.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
That's interesting. It seems to be working well for you.
Just a thought, consider experimenting with a dry lubricant like graphite or silicone. It may go a long way to reducing how tightly any ice can "bond" to the rubber. Try it in a small area and see how it works.
I read some posts about products people were using. I was worried about smearing, dripping and having to pre/re-applying. I had the spatula on-hand, too and it cost nothing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
303 Posts
Fair enough!
I don't think dry lube should ordinarily drip or smudge though. It was just a thought. I live in Las Vegas, so I probably won't ever get the chance to try it myself.
You may very well have the best solution already...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Don't use lubricants as I have found they will make the problem worse much worse I live in Northern Indiana and this was a constant problem not having a garage and the absolute best fix has been Prestone brand window de-icer recommended by my brother in law with the same car. After about four treatments the problem never came back until the following winter then just reapplied squirting it down the window tracks. Keep a can in the trunk just in case. Also (learned the hard way) you will destroy the window regulators eventually if you keep toggling the switch to try and free it up. Once frozen the de-icer stuff only takes about 30 seconds on average to work. Hope this helps!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,255 Posts
That's interesting. It seems to be working well for you.
Just a thought, consider experimenting with a dry lubricant like graphite or silicone. It may go a long way to reducing how tightly any ice can "bond" to the rubber. Try it in a small area and see how it works.

With my cars I used Gummi Pfledge (from a BMW parts department) to "treat" the various rubber weather stripping. This helped to keep the rubber soft and reduced the tendency in cold weather for the glass to freeze/stick to the rubber. The stuff didn't streak glass either.


It also helped to be sure to keep the glass or metal that contacted the rubber clean and the metal clean and waxed.



For Gummi Pfledge, here's a link:


https://www.ecstuning.com/b-genuine-bmw-parts/gummi-pflege/83192449390/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIu9eQgOiJ4AIVGNVkCh3mpQqSEAkYAiABEgIl7PD_BwE


Techs told me for the weather seals along the base of the window to keep this from squeaking to rub a dry bar of Ivory soap along the rubber/felt. The lanolin in the soap would act as a lubricant and the windows would go up and down quietly. However, over the years for some reason the windows of my cars never needed this treatment.
 

·
Registered
2016 Jazz Blue A8 Scat
Joined
·
694 Posts
I have tried the Gummi Pfledge 2x and applied it heavily. I still have to use a plastic butter knife that I keep in my coat pocket.

This is probably the biggest thing I dislike about these cars. They could have put a simple defrost strip along the door/window edge that fires up with the remote start like the seats and steering wheel do and it wouldn't have been a problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
This tends to happen with any vehicle. I have found it better to not mess with windows in the cold as it'll wreck the window guides. Would be simpler to have some heat going in the housing where the regulator sits so it'll at least not be frozen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,255 Posts
I have tried the Gummi Pfledge 2x and applied it heavily. I still have to use a plastic butter knife that I keep in my coat pocket.

This is probably the biggest thing I dislike about these cars. They could have put a simple defrost strip along the door/window edge that fires up with the remote start like the seats and steering wheel do and it wouldn't have been a problem.

My Hellcat has not seen freezing temperatures, snow/ice. But my Boxster did. The windows did not freeze to the weather stripping but were frozen/stuck where the glass entered the door.


As a result the window would not drop 1/2" upon opening the door. This was not a big deal opening but closing if the glass was up the top edge of the glass would hit the top rail.



What I did was to get in the car and gently wiggle the glass back and forth a bit while pressing the window lower button. The ice would let go and the window would go down and back up with no problems. Then I'd start the engine and direct the outside dash vents to blow air at the side glass. After not much time at all the side glass would be free of any ice.



The rear "glass" (plastic) window, too. Even the top would shed its load of snow/ice. This was encouraged by aiming the center dash vents upwards to direct hot air at the top. This along with the hot air that was directed at the base of the windshield which then flowed up under the stop helped to clear the top quite fast.
 

·
Registered
2015 RT 5.7 M6
Joined
·
7,565 Posts
I have used rain-x on the lower portion of my liberty windows near the seal with great success. Keeps water from wetting the surfaces.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
With my cars I used Gummi Pfledge (from a BMW parts department) to "treat" the various rubber weather stripping. This helped to keep the rubber soft and reduced the tendency in cold weather for the glass to freeze/stick to the rubber. The stuff didn't streak glass either.


It also helped to be sure to keep the glass or metal that contacted the rubber clean and the metal clean and waxed.



For Gummi Pfledge, here's a link:


https://www.ecstuning.com/b-genuine-bmw-parts/gummi-pflege/83192449390/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIu9eQgOiJ4AIVGNVkCh3mpQqSEAkYAiABEgIl7PD_BwE




Techs told me for the weather seals along the base of the window to keep this from squeaking to rub a dry bar of Ivory soap along the rubber/felt. The lanolin in the soap would act as a lubricant and the windows would go up and down quietly. However, over the years for some reason the windows of my cars never needed this treatment.
I have used Gummi Pfledge and it works "good" HOWEVER I now use Honda SHIN-ETSU grease on ALL my rubber door seals and this stuff is the BEST!.... Smear it on and let it sit for about an hour then wipe off the excess grease. This will keep your seals flexible, supple and water resistant. You can find this SHIN-ETSU GREASE on Flea Bay, Ammazon, or your Honda dealer if you want to risk being seen there. One tube (less than $20) will do two full size cars.

I agree with the quoted advice ^^^ As far as the window tracks go use wax from a small candle or soap bar (Small "Hotel soap bars" work great).... DO NOT use any sprays or lubes because it will make the problem worse over time by attracting dust and dirt.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top