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Discussion Starter #1
Can you guys give me some suggestions on winterizing my fuel system. I've heard things that range from keeping the tank full to prevent condensation to selecting a good fuel stabilizer. The car is outside under a cover, I run the car for a half hour once a week and if the roads permit it (winter Jersey roads and salt suck), I take it out for a short ride (half mile) to get the trans juices flowing. Any suggestions as to what would be the best way to store this animal over the winter months? I really don't want to damage the car or the fuel system while it sits for 3 to 3 1/2 months! :scratchhead:
 

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what i normally do is fill the tank up and add the proper amount of stabil then drive the car that day to get the fuel stabilizer through the fuel lines and stuff. then i park the car, put a battery tender on it and change the oil to prepare for its winter hibernation. with past cars i used to start them up every once and a while, but have since stopped doing that because unless the car is fully warmed up, it just creates condensation leading to moisture in the exhaust and other places. now, my car is stored in my garage, so being that yours is outside, it may be good to try and drive it once and a while if possible to get it up to full temps.

lets hear from guys that store their cars outside to get their feedback.
 

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Thanks for the input! Being from Pitts, Pa. lets me know you can experience the same crap (weather) as I do.
Nice color choice on the car... I'm gonna have to hook up with you for some info on the mods you have posted in that ride. :bigthumb:
 

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Thanks for the input! Being from Pitts, Pa. lets me know you can experience the same crap (weather) as I do.
Nice color choice on the car... I'm gonna have to hook up with you for some info on the mods you have posted in that ride. :bigthumb:
sure thing! i still have yet to install a lot of it, but this winter i'm going to be busy. and orange is the fastest ;)
 

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I would suggest that you do not start the engine at all unless you can drive it up to full operating temperature (maybe about 20 minutes or more). Internal combustion engines produce water vapor and if not allowed to boil off, can cause corrosion.

If the weather does not suit you to drive it often, connect a Battery Tender to it so your battery stays fully charged. I doubt you will need fuel stabilizer for just two or three months, but it is a good idea to fill the gas tank (even though it won't rust since it is plastic).
 

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If you can fill up with ethanol free gasoline instead of E10 or E15. Also if you decide to use a fuel stabalizer use the marine formula as the automotive formula has been know to cause acid and disolve gas tanks especially in boats down here on the coast.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
What brand of fuel stabilizer are we talking about that would create acid? Or is that an automotive grade stabilizer in general?
 

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Sorry I should have specified. We use Stabil, marine formula in our vehciles that are stored. The automotive Stabil seems to gum up the fuel system. It's the enthanol laced fuels that cause the acidic corosion. Ethanol can also cause fuel lines or any rubber/plastic parts to become brittle and fail. Small engines, such as chainsaws, lawnmowers, and even boats often encounter this due to long periods of storage.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the warning. You would tend to think with the use of ethanol fuels, your stabilizer would be blended for such circumstances. But then again why didn't I think to use a "marine" type stabilizer in my "terra-firma" vehicle!
 

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Here's an e-mail that the SEMA Action Network (SAN) sent out about ethanol laced fuels and their possible destructive side effects.

REGULATORY ALERT (UPDATE) SAN Leads the Way in Opposing E15 Waiver and Proposed Rule to Prevent Misfueling The SEMA Action Network (SAN) asked the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to suspend the partial waiver issued last October to permit the sale of E15 for model year 2007 and newer vehicles. While issuing the waiver, the EPA confirmed that there was insufficient test data to permit E15 to be used in MY 2000 and older light-duty motor vehicles. SAN has consistently voiced concern that ethanol increases water formation which can then create formic acid and corrode metals, plastics and rubber. The agency is still gathering data for the 2001-2006 vehicles. The EPA’s ruling responded to a request from the ethanol industry to raise the ethanol content in gasoline from 10 percent (E10) to 15 percent. The SAN also opposed a proposed rule on how to label gas pumps to help prevent vehicle misfueling, citing E10 as an example in which the EPA has not satisfied its mission to provide adequate information to the public on whether the fuel they are buying contains ethanol. There are no uniform nationwide requirements. Labeling rules are subject to state regulation. Some states do not require labels and the rules for other states vary depending upon the content percentage. SAN recommended that the EPA create national labeling requirements for both E15 and E10, and that the E15 warning label be placed as close as possible to the pump’s product selection mechanism. Several lawsuits have been filed against the EPA contending that the agency did not have the authority to issue a partial waiver. Legislation may also be introduced in Congress to overturn the waiver. SAN will continue to oppose E15 until there are conclusive scientific findings that demonstrate that it will not harm automobiles of any age as a result of corrosion or other chemical incompatibilities.
 

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I wish they would just stop putting any ethanol in the gasoline. :(
 

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Snuck mine out of its hidy hole today. The skies were clear and it was not predicted to get over 20 degrees. A perfect day to exercise. No battery tender for me.
 

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This is my 3rd winter and thus far I have done nothing special at all. My Challenger does get garaged but sometimes sits for as long as six weeks. Never had any issues, even with E10 fuel (though I avoid E10 whenever possible). Always starts right up (I'm sure the thin 5W/20 helps), and the tires haven't developed any flat spots. I never start it unless I'm going to drive it.

I only drive it on dry roads in the winter but even so it can get quite a bit of salt dust kicked up on it (especially the rear bumper). Usually just some detail spray is all it takes to get the salt off if it's too cold for a full wash (I'm always afraid I'll burst a pipe if I were to use my hose in the winter). The wheel wells are plastic so a little salt isn't much of a concern there.

I should also point out my garage is under my house and never gets below 40° F, even with my garage heaters shut off. I know this doesn't apply to the original post but just in case someone else in a similar situation to mine happens upon this thread...
 
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